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Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 12: administration of finances, politics, and justice.--recall. (search)
the independence of the Confederacy; and those governments and their officers did not scruple to take full advantage of Seward's timidity. After I had been relieved and had settled all my accounts with the government, so that not a dollar's difference stood between me and the government, suits were brought against me in New York, Baltimore, and elsewhere, to the amount of several hundred thousand dollars, for my acts during the war, or those done by my orders, even for the capture of General Twiggs' swords. All such suits have now been tried which the plaintiff would prosecute. These suits, by the law of military affairs, were to be defended by the government, and were so done by its law officers. I refused to have a single one settled. All were adjudicated in my favor; and not a dollar of a judgment has been rendered against the United States or myself in those suits. As all of them were against me as well as the government, and as the government could not defend itself
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 13: occupations in 1863; exchange of prisoners. (search)
ets in the hands of slaves; after peculation the most prodigious, and lies the most infamous, he returns, reeking with crime, to his own people, and they receive him with acclamations of joy in a manner that befits him and becomes themselves. Nothing is out of keeping; his whole career and its rewards are strictly artistic in conception and in execution. He was a thief. A sword that he had stolen from a woman — the niece of the brave Twiggs —— was presented to him as a reward of valor. Twiggs' sword, being deposited in the treasury by me, after the war was returned to his daughter, although his reputed mistress, from whose possession it was taken, brought suit against me in New York for it, which I successfully defended. He had violated the laws of God and man. The law makers of the United States voted him thanks, and the preachers of the Yankee gospel of blood came to him and worshipped him. He had broken into the safes and strong boxes of merchants. The New York Chamber of Com<
r Law, early history of contest, 90, 1090. Twenty-First Indiana Regiment, 481; 482; ought to have been sent to Galveston, 531. Twenty-Sixth Massachusetts, recruitment of, 306; on Ship Island at Fort St. Philip, 371, 467; cheers Butler leaving New Orleans, 533. Twenty-Fifth Virginia (city battalion), position near Richmond, 723. Twenty-Fourth Corps in Roanoke expedition,781. Twenty-Fourth Virginia cavalry, position near Richmond, 724. Twenty-Seventh Massachusetts, 898. Twiggs, General, evacuates New Orleans, 370; Butler occupies house of, 424; reference to, 431; his swords, 523; true story of his sword, 568; Lincoln recommends giving swords to Butler, 878-879. Tyler, Ex-President, in peace convention, 167; influences President Buchanan, 218. U United States of Columbia concedes land, 904. Ursuline Convent, 110-123; bill for relief of sufferers at brought by Butler, 113. Usher, Col. Roland G., warden of State prison, Massachusetts, 974. V Van Bure
Rebellion Record: Introduction., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore), Contents of Thie first volume. (search)
oombs to Mayor Wood, and Reply,26 27.Louisiana Secession Ordinance,26 28.The U. S. Cutter McClelland,27 29.The U. S. Mint at New Orleans,27 30.Texas Ordinance of Secession,27 31.Secretary Dix's Report,28 32.Montgomery Convention, Delegates to,29 33.Constitution of Confederate States,29 34.Southern Opinions,30 35.Memminger's Speech to the Convention,30 36.Counting the Vote for President of U. S.,31 37.Jefferson Davis's Inaugural Speech,31 38.President Lincoln's Journey, &c.,32 39.Twiggs's Treason — Property stolen,35 40.Peace Convention at Washington,35 41.Corwin's Amendment to Constitution,36 42.President Lincoln's Inaugural Address,36 43.The Press on the President's Inaugural,39 44. Confederate States Army Bill,40 45.London News on Southern Recognition,41 46.Braggs' Order stopping Supplies to Fort Pickens,42 47.Confederate Commissioners to Seward, and Reply,42 48.A. H. Stephens' Speech on the Corner Stone, 44 49.Vessel fired into at Charleston,49 50.U. S. Fleet
nearly all the favorites of Mr. Buchanan are engaged in the secession conspiracy. The monstrous transaction of Twiggs, in Texas, which bears the double character of unmitigated treason and individual dishonesty, has been long in process, and the celebrated Ben McCullough, one of Mr. Buchanan's most intimate friends, has been engaged in it. His household editor, William M. Browne, is at Montgomery, assisting disunion with all his ability, while his late Secretary of the Treasury, his late Secretary of War, his late Secretary of the Interior, and most of those who advocated his policy in Congress, either hold position under the Southern Confederacy, or occupy prominent places in the organization which sustains it. --Phila. Press.
An Irish regular.--The following dialogue really took place between Lieutenant A. C. C----d, late of the United States Texan army, and Pat Fletcher, one of the privates of the Second Cavalry, now at Car. lisle, then near Fort Bliss:-- Officer — Well, Pat, ain't you going to follow the General (Twiggs)? Pat--If Gineral Scott ordhers us to folly him, sir, begor Toby (Pat's horse) can gallop as well as the best of 'em. Officer — I mean, won't you leave the abolition army, and join the free South? Pat--Begor I never enlisted in th' abolition army, and never will. I agreed to sarve Uncle Sam for five year, and, the divil a pin mark was made in the contract, with my consint, ever since. When my time is up, if. the army isn't the same as it is now, I won't join it agin. Officer — Pat, the Second (Cavalry) was eighteen months old when you and I joined. The man who raised our gallant regiment is now the Southern President; the man who so lately commanded it, is now a South<
Gen. Twiggs and President Buchanan.--Gen. Twiggs, late of the United States Army, has addressed a letter to Ex-President Buchanan, in which he says:--Your usurped right to dismiss me from the army might be acquiesced in; but you had no right to brand me as a traitor. This was personal, and I shall treat it as such--not through the papers, but in person. I shall, most assuredly, pay a visit to Lancaster for the sole purpose of a personal interview with you. So, sir, prepare yourself. I am Gen. Twiggs, late of the United States Army, has addressed a letter to Ex-President Buchanan, in which he says:--Your usurped right to dismiss me from the army might be acquiesced in; but you had no right to brand me as a traitor. This was personal, and I shall treat it as such--not through the papers, but in person. I shall, most assuredly, pay a visit to Lancaster for the sole purpose of a personal interview with you. So, sir, prepare yourself. I am well assured that public opinion will sanction any course I may take with you. --Charleston Courier, May 18.
cutting off my small brigade, being at the time alone, (General Ripley's brigade, on my right, being several hundred yards away, as I found by sending Captain Montgomery, First Georgia regulars, to report for orders, who reported him at least one fourth of a mile from my right, after a long search,) I ordered my brigade to move by the left flank and recross the road in our original rear, and there re-formed my line of battle, and was advancing to find the right of Drayton's brigade, when Captain Twiggs and Lieutenant Lamar, First Georgia regulars, in charge of skirmishers, called my attention to the fact that the enemy were crossing the road in considerable force on my left flank. Seeing this myself, and to prevent my left from being turned, I moved by the left, diagonally to the rear, to intercept them, and at this time found General Hood's two brigades coming up to support that part of the line. He engaged the enemy and drove him back. Not knowing where to find General Ripley or G
Doc. 5.-General Twiggs' Treachery. Jackson barracks, New Orleans, March 17, 1863. My dear----: I suppose you have long thought me dead; but I have not had an opportunity, until the present time, of letting you know why I have been so long silent, but I trust in God this will find you well. This letter was written by a private soldier belonging to the Eighth United States regulars, which regiment was surrendered to the rebels by the treachery of General Twiggs in 1861. I hardly know what to begin with first, for I have so long a list of adventures to tell you. When I received your letter, in Hatch's Ranche, New Mexico, I answered it by the nexer by the gallant Major Anderson convinced the most sceptical that things were taking a very serious turn. Shortly after the above events, we got orders from General Twiggs, the commander of the department of Texas, to evacuate the state, and turn over all the forts and stores to commissioners appointed by the state: we prepared
he names of many officers whose gallantry should be recorded, and shall, in a subsequent report, endeavor to do justice to all. I must, in conclusion, mention the good conduct of Sergeant Williams, of Lieutenant Poore's company, and Corporal Conneway, of the Twenty-second Georgia battalion, who greatly distinguished themselves. To the officers of my personal staff I am under obligations. I lament to record the death of the gallant Captain Waring, A. A. D. C., and the wounding of Captain Twiggs, Inspector-General, and Captain Stony, A. D. C., who were stricken down, nobly discharging their duty. To Captain Taliaferro, A. A. G., Lieutenants Mazyck and Cunningham, Ordnance Officers, and Meade, A. D. C., and to Surgeon Habersham, Major Holcombe, and Captain Boote, I tender my thanks for their aid, &c., during the course of the week. I would especially mention Captain Barnwell, of the engineers. In the early part of the week, the commands of Colonel Olmstead, Lieutenant-Colo
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