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eans, La. Extracts from his report, giving account of taking Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and early occupation of New Orleans, with mention of 26th Regt. M. V. I. Boston Evening Journal, May 16, 1862, p. 2, col. 3. — – – May. Occupation of Gen. Twiggs' house. Army and Navy Journal, vol. 24, p. 752. — – – – Boston Evening Journal, May 13, 1862, p. 2, cols. 4, 7. — – – – Letter dated May 7, giving graphic account of doings there; special cor. Boston Evening Journal, May 22, 1862, p. 2,e with Gen. C. P. Stone, Ball's Bluff, 1861. Army and Navy Jour, vol. 5, p. 142. Sumner, col. Edwin Vose. (General) Character, war history and services, 1812-61; upon report of his nomination to generalship made vacant by departure of Gen. Twiggs; one-fourth column. Boston Evening Journal, March 8, 1861, p. 4, col. 1. — Blamed for not ordering up the reserve at Williamsburg, Va., May 5, 1862. Boston Evening Journal, May 14, 1862, p. 4, col. 2. — Fair Oaks, Va.;
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
ghman was graduated at the United States military academy in 1836, and was commissioned second-lieutenant in the First Dragoons. September 30, 1836, he resigned and took up the profession of civil engineering, becoming division engineer of the Baltimore & Susquehanna railroad in 1836-37; of the Norfolk & Wilmington canal in 1837-38; of the Eastern Shore railroad of Maryland in 1838-39; and of the Baltimore & Ohio railroad in 1839-40. He served in the war with Mexico as volunteer aide to General Twiggs in the battles of Palo Alto and Resaca de la Palma, and was captain of the Maryland and District of Columbia battalion of volunteers in 1847-48. He then engaged as principal assistant engineer of the Panama division of the Isthmus railroad, and was engineer on Southern railroads until 1859. He joined the army of the Confederate States in 1861, and was commissioned brigadier-general. In February, 1862, he was charged with the inspection of Fort Henry, one of the most important defenses
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
way, for on leaving it to a vote as to whether they would reenlist, a majority decided against reenlistment. This disbandment was under the construction of the War Department. General Taylor, after the disbandment of General Johnston's regiment, appointed him inspector general of the field division of volunteers, under Major General Butler, which he accepted, desirous as he was to participate in the campaign then opening. General Johnston in describing the attack made by Generals Worth and Twiggs, and the gallant charge made by the Tennesseeans and Mississippians, proceeds to speak of that portion of the field occupied by the Ohio regiment under Colonel Mitchell. He says: Colonel Mitchell's Ohio regiment entered the town more to the right, and attacked the works with great courage and spirit. But here was concentrated the fire of all the enemy's works. From this point, or a little in the rear, the regulars had been forced back, with great loss of officers and men. Having been orde
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Laying the corner Stone of the monument tomb of the Army of Tennessee Association, New Orleans. (search)
way, for on leaving it to a vote as to whether they would reenlist, a majority decided against reenlistment. This disbandment was under the construction of the War Department. General Taylor, after the disbandment of General Johnston's regiment, appointed him inspector general of the field division of volunteers, under Major General Butler, which he accepted, desirous as he was to participate in the campaign then opening. General Johnston in describing the attack made by Generals Worth and Twiggs, and the gallant charge made by the Tennesseeans and Mississippians, proceeds to speak of that portion of the field occupied by the Ohio regiment under Colonel Mitchell. He says: Colonel Mitchell's Ohio regiment entered the town more to the right, and attacked the works with great courage and spirit. But here was concentrated the fire of all the enemy's works. From this point, or a little in the rear, the regulars had been forced back, with great loss of officers and men. Having been orde
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Lee and Scott. (search)
of the United States, was at Washington city. Colonel Lee, in command of his regiment, was stationed in Texas—Governor Anderson living at San Antonio, Texas. General Twiggs was in command of the military department of Texas. On November 20th, 1860, Governor Anderson had made a speech at a secession meeting at the Alamo, opposiges very improbable. These papers General Scott enclosed to Governor Anderson, and, in a private note, requested Governor Anderson to exhibit the paper to General Twiggs and Colonel Lee especially, and to such other officers of the army as he might deem advisable. The paper was left with Twiggs and with Lee, each retaining Twiggs and with Lee, each retaining it for several days. Some time after General Lee had read and returned these papers to Governor Anderson, the arrangement had been made by which the army of the United States in Texas was surrendered to the Committee of Vigilance, consisting of Messrs. Maverick, Divine and Luckett, all of which, being a part of the general histor
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Correction of errors in statement of Governor Anderson, and letter of General Echols. (search)
then existing in the Confederate army, and to the highest rank of the officers who were transferred by Virginia, as was due to the position he held in that army. The relative rank of officers who left the Army of the United States and joined that of the Confederacy was fixed by the law of March 14th, 1861; beyond this the Executive had authority to select General officers, with the limitation that, after the army was organized, the selection must be made from the officers thereof. Brigadier-General Twiggs was the highest in rank of the officers who left the United States army to serve the Confederacy, and under our law must have had the highest rank if he had been willing to enter for the general service; he declined to do so, and was commissioned in the provisional army. So much for the fictitious engagement with Sidney Johnston for first command. But, yet further, it may be stated that when Lee left the United States army and took service with Virginia, and when he was commissi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Robert Edward Lee. (search)
advice upon an attack at dawn. But it was essential that communication should be established with Scott's headquarters. Lee declared his purpose to effect this communication, and through the stormy night, alone and on foot, with enemies on either hand, he pushed his way across that volcanic waste, comparable only in the difficulties it presented to some Alpine glacier rent with yawning chasms. He won his way to Scott by midnight. At daybreak as engineer he guided the front attack led by Twiggs. The turning column heard their comrades' guns. They fell on the Mexican rear. A brief and bloody resistance served only to heighten the triumph of American skill and valor. The position was won, and Contreras, to the eye of history, prefigures Chancellorsville. General Scott described this exploit of Lee's as the greatest feat of physical and moral courage performed by any individual, in his knowledge, pending the campaign. History will record, as Scott himself nobly admitted, that
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Confederate treaty. (search)
forces of Fort Duncan, Eagle Pass, Texas, in 1863 and 1864. Colonel Giddings is now in Washington, and his account of this transaction is both interesting and novel. In 1863 I was commissioned by Jefferson Davis as lieutenant-colonel in command of the Confederate forces at Fort Duncan, Eagle Pass, said Colonel Giddings to your correspondent. On assuming command of the fort, I was advised that an old Federal soldier, by the name of McManus, who had been paroled at the surrender of General Twiggs and broken his parole, and crossed the Rio Grande and opened a recruiting office for the Federals in Piedras Negras, Mexico, and, that it was the headquarters for the organization of bands of renegades and Mexican thieves, who were committing depredations upon the property of citizens of Texas. I called on Colonel Garza, who was in command of the Mexican forces and found my information to be correct. I filed a protest with Colonel Garza, stating that it was in violation of internationa
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.24 (search)
k at the end of four long, bloody years. The official language of our battalion was French; we were drilled in French, commanded in French, and orders were issued in French, and as I was the only officer who did not understand the language, you can well imagine my awkwardness. However, I soon became familiar with the commands most frequently used, and it was not long before I could get my company through dress parade in a more or less creditable manner. Orders came after awhile from General Twiggs to discontinue the French language and to adopt English, and matters went along more smoothly as far as I was concerned. The company to which I was assigned was composed principally of Irishmen, who resented the change quite fiercely. One of our fellows, who enlisted under the name of Jones, but whose name was Branagan, while somewhat more than half drunk, approached the writer, and, touching his kepi, said: Leftenant, I don't know what oi'll do. You want us to drill in English, and t
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book I:—the American army. (search)
them did not adopt this course, so much at variance with the common notions of military honor, without regret. These regrets, well known to their old comrades, contributed to mitigate the horrors of war, by removing from it all bitterness and passion; and their recollection actuated General Grant when, four years later, he extended a friendly hand to his conquered adversary. There were some, however, who by their conduct aggravated the always painful spectacle of military defection. General Twiggs, who commanded the troops in Texas, was seen conniving at the success of the rebellion while still wearing the Federal uniform, and delivering into the hands of the rebels the depots of provisions and ammunition of his own soldiers, in order to take away from the latter every means of resistance. Abandoned by a portion of their officers, destitute of resources, finding only enemies among the ungrateful population they had protected during so many years, these brave soldiers were further
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