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Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 4 (search)
an assault. Barlow crossed the Po on the right, but was afterwards ordered back, and had a brilliant rear-guard fight in which he punished the enemy. From five to six P. M. there was heavy cannonading, the battalions firing by volley. At 6.30 Upton, with a heavy column of picked men, made a most brilliant assault with the bayonet, at the left of the Sixth Corps. The men rushed on, without firing a shot, carried the breastworks in the face of cannon and musketry, and took 900 prisoners. Some of the men, who faltered, were run through the body by their comrades! But Mott's men on the left behaved shamefully, and so Upton was obliged again to fall back, bringing his prisoners with him. 11 P. M. Grant in consultation with Meade. Wright came up also; he uttered no complaints, but said quietly and firmly to Meade: General, I don't want Mott's men on my left; they are not a support; I would rather have no troops there! Warren is not up to a corps command. As in the Mine Run move
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), Index (search)
visiting, 41, 63; indignation of a, 262. Sykes, George, 34, 52, 53, 60, 80; visited, 8; at dinner, 72. Ta, the, 119. Thanksgiving Day, 278. Thatcher, Horace Kellogg, 171. Theatre, engineers', 311. Thomas, George Henry, 296. Thomas, Henry Goddard, 211. Thomas, Lorenzo, 290. Thompson, —, 130. Todd's Tavern, 103. Tompkins, Charles H., 112. Townsend, Charles, 22. Trobriand, Philippe Regis de, 256. Trowbridge, —, 312. Tyler, John, 159. Tyler, —, 185. Tyler house, 121. Upton, Emory, 109. Vermont captain, exploit of a, 174. Via's house, 140. Virginia, devastation, 48; houses, 301. Volunteers, 209. Votes, fraudulent, 263. Wadsworth, James Samuel, 90, 180. Wadsworth, Craig, 125. Wainwright, Charles Sheils, 296. Walker, Mary E., 6n. Wall house, 339. Wallace, Lewis, 185. Wallace, —, 341. Walsh, James William, 343. War, general features, 124; ending the, 187. Ward, John Henry Hobart, 82; relieved from command, 106. Warren, Gouverneur Kemble,
on and opened on the foe. Just before dark the storming parties — Russell's and Upton's brigades, led by General Russell in person — were formed. The Fifth corps weeady sent back message after message to the Second brigade (commanded by Colonel Emory Upton) to hurry forward two regiments to charge those rifle-pits, and he will tly, needing no reminder when he knows he is needed at the front, comes forward Upton — courageous and ambitious — with his solid columns, loading as they advance atg line. Dusk has now fairly shut in. Steady, men, don't fire a shot, rings out Upton's voice above the roar of battle, and at a charge in they go. One volley only ito the rebel position at this point, were carried by a mere skirmish line. Colonel Upton's brigade, the movements of which were directed by General Russell, took soitting here to acknowledge the soldierly conduct and valuable assistance of Colonel Upton and his gallant regiments, the Fifth Maine and the One Hundred and Twenty-
under command of General Edward Johnson. It was near the scene of Upton's gallant charge on the 10th. Here at daybreak on May 12th the divnderson drove them back. On the Federal side the Sixth Corps, with Upton's brigade in the advance, was hurried forward to hold the advantage after a day of strengthening positions on both sides, young Colonel Emory Upton of the 121st New York, led a storming party of twelve regimeplace was stationed Doles' brigade of Georgia regiments, and Colonel Emory Upton was ordered to charge Doles with a column of twelve regimento'clock was the signal for the charge, and twenty minutes later, as Upton tells us, at command, the lines rose, moved noiselessly to the edge General Wright had ordered. The Confederates were reenforced, and Upton could do no more than hold the captured entrenchments until orderedere killed or wounded. For gallantry displayed in this charge, Colonel Upton was made brigadier-general. The losses to the Union army in
under command of General Edward Johnson. It was near the scene of Upton's gallant charge on the 10th. Here at daybreak on May 12th the divnderson drove them back. On the Federal side the Sixth Corps, with Upton's brigade in the advance, was hurried forward to hold the advantage after a day of strengthening positions on both sides, young Colonel Emory Upton of the 121st New York, led a storming party of twelve regimeplace was stationed Doles' brigade of Georgia regiments, and Colonel Emory Upton was ordered to charge Doles with a column of twelve regimento'clock was the signal for the charge, and twenty minutes later, as Upton tells us, at command, the lines rose, moved noiselessly to the edge General Wright had ordered. The Confederates were reenforced, and Upton could do no more than hold the captured entrenchments until orderedere killed or wounded. For gallantry displayed in this charge, Colonel Upton was made brigadier-general. The losses to the Union army in
as Adelbert Ames, of the class of 1861, colonel of the Twentieth Maine, closely followed by Judson Kilpatrick, colonel of the Second New York Cavalry, and by Wesley Merritt, whose star was given him just before Gettysburg, when only twenty-seven. With Merritt, too, came Custer, only twenty-three when he donned the silver stars, and first charged at the head of the Wolverine Brigade on Stuart's gray squadrons at the far right flank at Gettysburg. A few months later and James H. Wilson, Emory Upton, and Ranald Mackenzie, all young, gifted, and most soldierly West Pointers, were also promoted to the stars, as surely would have been gallant Patrick O'Rorke, but for the bullet that laid him low at Gettysburg. That battle was the only one missed by another boy colonel, who proved so fine a soldier that New York captured him from his company in the Twenty-second Massachusetts and made him lieutenant-colonel of their own Sixty-first. Severe wounds kept him out of Gettysburg, but May, 18
ifty-one Union generals killed in battle. Beneath each portrait is the date and place of death, or mortal wounding. Since no such pictorial necrology existed to aid the editors of this History, many questions arose—such as the determination of the actual rank of an officer at a given date, or the precise circumstances of death in certain instances. The list of Colonel W. F. Fox, presented in his work on Regimental losses in the Civil War, has been followed. forefront, and its gallant Colonel Upton in his report says this was the regiment's first battle. Its loss, as officially reported, was two hundred and twenty-two killed and wounded. at Fredericksburg, December 13, 1862, Franklin with the Federal left broke through Jackson's lines. The Confederates restored their line after heavy losses, and in this counterstroke a North Carolina regiment, fresh from home, drove headlong through the Northern lines and was with difficulty recalled. The apology of one of its privates, when
tember, 1864, and was temporary commander of the Twenty-fifth Army Corps, January-February, 1865. He resigned from tle service in May, 1865, and died in Philadelphia, January 14, 1896. Federal generals--no. 17 New York (continued) Nelson Taylor, originally Colonel of the 72d regiment. John H. H. Ward, originally Colonel of the 38th regiment. Daniel Ullmann, originally Colonel of the 78th regiment. Adolph von Steinwehr, originally Colonel of the 29th Infantry. Emory Upton led a Storming column at Spotsylvania. Egbert L. Viele, engaged at Fort Pulaski and Norfolk. Alexander Shaler commanded a brigade at Spotsylvania. Ninteenth Army Corps On January 5, 1863, the troops in the Department of the Gulf were constituted the Nineteenth Army Corps, with Major-General N. P. Banks in command. Its other leaders were Major-General W. B. Franklin, Brigadier-Generals W. H. Emory, B. S. Roberts, M. K. Lawler, and Major-General J. J. Reynolds. It operated
. 13, 1865. Stoneman, G., Mar. 13, 1865. Sturgis, S. D., Mar. 13, 1865. Sumner, Edwin V., May 6, 1864. Swayne, Wager, Mar. 2, 1867. Swords, Thomas, Mar. 13, 1865. Sykes, George, Mar. 13, 1865. Terry, Alfred H., Mar. 13, 1865. Thomas, Charles, Mar. 13, 1865. Thomas, Lorenzo, Mar. 13, 1865. Torbert, A. T. A., Mar. 13, 1865. Totten, J. G., April 21, 1864. Tower, Z. B., Mar. 13, 1865. Townsend, E. D., Mar. 13, 1865. Turner, J. W., Mar. 13, 1865. Tyler, Robt. O., Mar. 13, 1865. Upton, Emory, Mar. 13, 1865 Van Vliet, S., Mar. 13, 1865. Vinton, D. H., Mar. 13, 1865. Warren, G. K., Mar. 13, 1865. Webb, Alex. S., Mar. 13, 1865. Weitzel, G., Mar. 13, 1865. Wheaton, Frank, Mar. 13, 1865. Whipple, A. W., May 7, 1863. Whipple, Wm. D., Mar. 13, 1865. Willcox, O. B., Mar. 2, 1867. Williams, Seth, Mar. 13, 1865. Wilson, James H., Mar. 13, 1865. Wood, Thos. J., Mar. 13, 1865. Woodbury, D. P., Aug. 15, 1864. Woods, Chas. R., Mar. 13, 1865. Wright, H. G., Mar. 13, 1865.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Michie, Petee Smith 1839- (search)
Michie, Petee Smith 1839- Military officer; born in Brechin, Scotland, March 24, 1839; came to the United States in boyhood; graduated at West Point and commissioned a first lieutenant of engineers in 1863. He was promoted captain on Nov. 23, 1865, and was appointed Professor of Natural and Experimental Philosophy in the United States Military Academy on Feb. 14, 1871, a post he held till his death. His publications include Elements of wave motion relating to Sound and light; Life and letters of Major-General Emory Upton; Personnel of sea-coast defence; elements of Analytical Mechanics; elements of Hydro-Mechanics; and Practical Astronomy. He died in West Point, N. Y., Feb. 16, 1901.
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