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Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To John G. Whittier. (search)
To John G. Whittier. Wayland, January 10, 1871. I thank you, from my heart, for your volume of beautiful poems, and for the kind inscription. But what is the world coming to when a plain-coated Friend dates Christmas instead of Twelfth Month? If thou departest from the ancient testimonies in this way, friend John, thou wilt assuredly be dealt with. I am very indifferent to anything the world can give, either its pleasures or its honors; and I am very little prone to envy, but I do envy you your wide-spread popularity, because it furnishes you with such ample means to scatter abroad the living seeds of goodness and truth. Thanks to the Heavenly Father, that the great opportunity fell into hands that used it so conscientiously and so industriously! For myself, I cannot accomplish much ; but I will try to deserve the acknowledgment, She hath done what she could. One of my old-time friends sent me, for a New Year's present, a book on Siam, by an English lady who was for severa
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To John G. Whittier. (search)
To John G. Whittier. Wayland, June 18, 1874. I cannot help writing to thank you for the Lines you have written to the memory of Charles Sumner. They are very beautiful, and nothing could be more appropriate. We went into Boston to hear Mr. Curtis's Memorial Address. I had been longing, amid all the fuss and formality, to hear just the right thing said about Mr. Sumner, and Mr. Curtis said it, and said it eloquently, from the heart. . . . Corruption is so widespread and so rampant, that I sometimes have gloomy forebodings concerning the future of this country; but the spontaneous and general homage to Charles Sumner's memory shows that there is still great respect for integrity deeply rooted in the popular mind. I was reading over several of your poems last week, and for the thousandth time I felt myself consoled and strengthened by them, as well as delighted with their poetic beauty. It was a very precious gift you received, dear friend, to be such a benefactor to the so
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To John G. Whittier. (search)
To John G. Whittier. Wayland, January 20, 1876. You remember Charles Sprague's description of scenes he witnessed from a window near State Street? First, Garrison dragged through the streets by a mob; second, Burns carried back to slavery by United States troops, through the same street; third, a black regiment marching down the same street to the tune of John Brown, to join the United States army for the emancipation of their race. What a thrilling historical poem might be made of that! I have always thought that no incident in the antislavery conflict, including the war, was at once so sublime and romantic as Robert G. Shaw riding through Washington Street at the head of that black regiment. He, so young, so fair, so graceful in his motions, so delicately nurtured, so high-bred in his manners, waving his sword to friends at the windows, like a brave young knight going forth to deeds of high emprise ; followed by that dark-faced train, so long trampled in the dust, and now awa
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Mrs. S. E. Sewall. (search)
Garrison, I have seemed to feel the presence of you and your dear, good husband, as you say you have felt line. I thought of you continually — on the day of the funeral, and while reading the beautiful tributes offered by Phillips and Weld and Whittier. If his spirit was there, how happy he must have been! The general laudation in the newspapers was truly wonderful. If any prophet had foretold it thirty years ago, who would have believed him? It seems to me there never was so great a morale been much more so to have heard them. If Mr. Garrison was mistaken in his strong belief that individual, conscious existence continued elsewhere, he will never know of his mistake ; but I think he was not mistaken. I suppose you noticed that Whittier recognized his spirit as still active in defending the right. How could such a spirit die? I should think that painful Pocasset tragedy might open people's eyes to the absurdity of taking the records of a semi-barbarous people for an inspire
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Theodore D. Weld. (search)
ly forgetful of self than were the abolitionists in those early days, before the moral force which emanated from them had become available as a political power. All, my friend, that is the only true church organization, when heads and hearts unite in working for the welfare of the human race! And how wonderfully everything came as it was wanted! How quickly the mingled flute and trumpet eloquence of Phillips responded to the clarion call of Garrison! How the clear, rich bugle-tones of Whittier wakened echoes in all living souls! How wealth poured from the ever-open hands of Arthur Tappan, Gerrit Smith, the Winslows, and thousands of others who gave even more largely in proportion to their smaller means! How the time-serving policy of Dr. Beecher drove the bold, brave boys of Lane Seminary into the battle-field! Politicians said, The abolitionists exaggerate the evil; they do not know whereof they affirm; and in response up rose Angelina and her sister Sarah, shrinking from
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), Appendix. (search)
f all we sought. Did we not witness in the life of thee Immortal prophecy? And feel, when with thee, that thy footsteps trod An everlasting road? Not for brief days thy generous sympathies, Thy scorn of selfish ease; Not for the poor prize of an earthly goal Thy strong uplift of soul. Than thine was never turned a fonder heart To nature and to art In fair-formed Hellas in her golden prime, Thy Philothea's time. Yet, loving beauty, thou couldst pass it by, And for the poor deny Thyself, and see thy fresh, sweet flower of fame Wither in blight and blame. Sharing His love who holds in His embrace The lowliest of our race, Sure the Divine economy must be Conservative of thee! For truth must live with truth, self-sacrifice Seek out its great allies; Good must find good by gravitation sure, And love with love endure. And so, since thou hast passed within the gate Whereby awhile I wait, I give blind grief and blinder sense the lie: Thou hast not lived to die! John Greenleaf Whittier.
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), List of Mrs. Child's works, with the date of their first publication as far as ascertained. (search)
the United States; Old Scip; Derivation of Negro; Opinions of Travellers; Jamaica Mobs. Follen, Mrs., Remember the slave; The runaway slave. Child, D. L. Henry Diaz; Three Colored Republics of Guiana; Judicial Decisions in Slave States. Whittier, J. G. The Slave Ships. Whittier, E. H. The Slave Trader. Bradley, J. History of J. B,, by Himself. may, Rev. S. J. Miss Crandall's School. Florence. The Infant Abolitionist. Gould, H. F. The Land of the Free.-English Protest agaiWhittier, E. H. The Slave Trader. Bradley, J. History of J. B,, by Himself. may, Rev. S. J. Miss Crandall's School. Florence. The Infant Abolitionist. Gould, H. F. The Land of the Free.-English Protest against the Colonization Society.-Alexander Vasselin.-Cornelius of St. Croix.-Ruins of Egyptian Thebes.-History of Thomas Jenkins.--A Negro Hunt.--An Anti-Slavery Catechism. Newburyport, 1836. 12vo. The Evils of Slavery and the Curse of Slavery. The first proved by the opinions of Southerners themselves; the last shown by historical evidence. Newburyport, 1836. 12vo. Philothea: a Romance. Boston, 1836. 12vo. The Family Nurse. Boston, 1837. 12vo. Authentic Narratives of American Slav
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), Index. (search)
, 83; death of her father, 87; interviews with Charles Sumner and Henry Wilson, 88; her low estimate of worldly rank, 89 ; corresponds with Miss Mattie Griffith, 89: meets David A. Wasson, 91; her grief at Ellis Gray Loring's death, 95; meets J. G. Whittier, 97; her indebtedness to her brother, 98; her delight in works of art and in nature, 98, 99; reads Buckle's History of civilization, 99; lines in memory of Ellis Gray Loring, 101; correspondence with John Brown, Governor Wise, and Mrs. Mason,of Theodore Parker. 179. Weld, Angelina Grimke, memorial of, 258. Weld, Theodore D., letter to, 258. Westminster Review, The, 202. White, Maria, 50. Whitney, Miss, Anne, letters to, 247, 256; her statue of Samuel Adams, 257. Whittier, John G., biographical sketch of Mrs. Child, v.-xxv., 97; lines to Mrs. Child, on Ellis Gray Loring, 102; annoyed by curiosity-seekers, 142; letters to, 157, 159, 210, 215, 228, 235, 236; on the death of S. J. May, 212; his tribute to Colonel Shaw,
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), Standard and popular Library books, selected from the catalogue of Houghton, Mifflin and Co. (search)
al Folks. Illustrated. 12mo, $1.50. The Other Girls. Illustrated. 12mo, $1.50. Sights and Insights. 2 vols. 12mo, $3.00. Odd or Even. $1.50. Boys at Chequasset. $1.50. Pansies. Square 16mo, $1.50. Just How. 16mo, $1.00. John G. Whittier. Poems. Household Edition. Portrait. $2.00. Cambridge Edition. Portrait. 3 vols. crown 8vo, $6.75. Red-Line Edition. Portrait. 12 illustrations. $2.50. Diamond Edition. 18mo, $1.00. Library Edition. Portrait. 32 illustrations. 8vo, $4se Works. Cambridge Edition. 2 vols. $4.50. John Woolman's Journal. Introduction by Whittier. $1.50. Child Life in Poetry. Selected by Whittier. Illustrated $2.25. Child Life in Prose. $2.25. Songs of Three Centuries. Selected by J. G. Whittier. Household Edition. 12mo, $2.00. Illustrated Library Edition. 32 illustrations. $4.00. Justin Winsor. Reader's Handbook of the American Revolution. 16mo, $1.25. A catalogue containing portraits of many of the above authors, w
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, VI: in and out of the pulpit (search)
nomination of the Free Soil Party for Congress and wrote thus to his brother:— You have probably seen my nomination for Congress. I did all I could to get Whittier nominated, but he obstinately declined, and it was he who proposed my name. . . . Perhaps I should not have started my [local] newspaper column had I expectednd told me anecdotes of Henry's ways which are more domestic and filial than one would suppose. While at Newburyport, Higginson renewed his acquaintance with Whittier, having first met him when a boy of nineteen. I spent a day in Amesbury and saw Whittier. . . . Dark, slender, bald, blackhaired, kind, calm, flashing eyeWhittier. . . . Dark, slender, bald, blackhaired, kind, calm, flashing eyed, keen, somewhat narrow; not commanding, but interesting. Evidently injured by politics, easily content with limited views; yet sympathetic and (probably) generous. Lives in an appropriate cottage yet very simple. A queer compound of Yankee-Quaker and Yankee-hero and Yankee-poet; the nationality everywhere. He would whittle,
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