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Euripides, The Suppliants (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 14 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Amphitryon, or Jupiter in Disguise (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 14 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 14 0 Browse Search
Sophocles, Oedipus Tyrannus (ed. Sir Richard Jebb) 12 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 12 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 12 0 Browse Search
Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 10 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Rhetoric (ed. J. H. Freese) 10 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 10 0 Browse Search
Demades, On the Twelve Years 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin). You can also browse the collection for Thebes (Greece) or search for Thebes (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 31 results in 28 document sections:

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Isocrates, Panathenaicus (ed. George Norlin), section 172 (search)
And let no one suppose that I fail to realize that I am giving a different version of these same events from that which I shall be found to have written in the Panegyricus. But I do not think that anyone of those who can grasp the meaning of these events is so obsessed by stupidity and envy as not to commend me and consider me discreet for the manner in which I have treated them then and now.The version here is less offensive to the Thebans, perhaps because Athens is now cultivating friendlier relations with Thebes.
Isocrates, Panathenaicus (ed. George Norlin), section 173 (search)
On this topic, then, I know that I have written wisely and expediently. But how pre-eminent our city stood in war at that time—for it was with the desire to show this that I discussed what happened at Thebes—is, I consider, clearly revealed to all by the circumstances which compelled the king of the Argives to become a suppliant of Athens and which so disposed the authorities at Thebes towards
Isocrates, Plataicus (ed. George Norlin), section 8 (search)
At times, you know, they attempt to maintain that they have subjected us to this treatment because we were unwilling to be members of their federation.That is, to join the Boeotian Confederation, of which Thebes held the hegemony, and thus to be tributary ( SUNTELEI=N) to the Thebans. But I ask you to consider, first, if on such grounds it is just to inflict penalties so contrary to justice and so cruel; next, if it seems to you consistent with the dignity of the city of the Plataeans, without their consent but under compulsion, to accept such dependence under the Thebans. For my part, I consider that there exists no people more overbearing than those who blot out the cities of each of us and compel us, when we have no use for it, to participate in their form of poli
Isocrates, Plataicus (ed. George Norlin), section 9 (search)
Besides this, they are clearly inconsistent in their dealings with others and with us. For when they were unable to gain our consent, they should have gone no farther than to compel us to submit to the hegemony of Thebes as they compelled Thespiae and Tanagra; for in that case we should not have suffered irremediable misfortunes. But as it is, they have made it clear that it was not their intention to give us that status; on the contrary, it was our territory they coveted.
Isocrates, Plataicus (ed. George Norlin), section 19 (search)
They accuse the Lacedaemonians because they occupied the Cadmea and established garrisons in their cities, yet they themselves, not sending garrisons, but razing the walls of some and entirely destroying others, think they have committed no atrocity; nay, they have come to such a pitch of shamelessness that while they demand that all their allies should be guardians of the safety of Thebes, yet they arrogate to themselves the right to impose slavery upon everybody else.
Isocrates, Plataicus (ed. George Norlin), section 20 (search)
hey must be on terms of equality with the stronger and who begrudge your city the territory ceded by the Oropians,Oropus, a town on the frontier between Attica and Boeotia, was long a bone of contention. In 412 B.C. it was treacherously taken by Thebes (Thucydides viii. 60); at some time after 402 B.C. it was under Athenian protection; in 366 B.C. Oropus was again seized by Thebes, but in 338 B.C. Philip gave the town to Athens. yet themselves forcibly seize and portion out territory not theirst be on terms of equality with the stronger and who begrudge your city the territory ceded by the Oropians,Oropus, a town on the frontier between Attica and Boeotia, was long a bone of contention. In 412 B.C. it was treacherously taken by Thebes (Thucydides viii. 60); at some time after 402 B.C. it was under Athenian protection; in 366 B.C. Oropus was again seized by Thebes, but in 338 B.C. Philip gave the town to Athens. yet themselves forcibly seize and portion out territory not the
Isocrates, Plataicus (ed. George Norlin), section 21 (search)
And not content with their other base misrepresentations, they now say that they pursued this course for the common good of the allies. And yet what they ought to have done, inasmuch as there is an Hellenic CouncilAthens' Second Confederacy, organized in 377 B.C. For this Council cf. § 18 above. here and your city is more competent than Thebes to advise prudent measures, is, not to be here now to defend the acts they have already committed, but to have come to you for consultation before they took any such action.
Isocrates, Plataicus (ed. George Norlin), section 33 (search)
Accordingly, to these Thebans no plea is left, such is the magnitude of their crimes, and to those who wish to speak on their behalf only this—that Boeotia is now fighting in defense of your country, and that, if you put an end to your friendship with them, you will be acting to the detriment of your allies; for it will be a matter of great consequence if the city of Thebes takes the side of the Lacedaemonians
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