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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 131 (search)
nce to the front and threw up works. That night the rebels evacuated, and early the next morning we were after them. They retreated to the top of Kenesaw Mountain. We followed them to the foot of the mountain, where we intrenched and lay until the 25th. During our stay we suffered some from the rebel sharpshooters and artillery. On the night of the 25th we left the works and moved to the right. Early on the 27th we were thrown into the front line of works, then occupied by a brigade of Hooker's corps. To gain this position we were obliged to pass through an open field for several rods. While doing this we lost a good many good men. A charge was made by our division that day, but our regiment did not participate. We lay here until the morning of the 3d, the rebels having evacuated the night before. We followed them through Marietta, and were placed in the front line when we did find them. On the night of July 4 we were sent on picket. That night the rebels again evacuated
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 138 (search)
line, under Capt. M. B. Clason, of the One hundred and twenty-first Ohio, was advanced at daylight and discovered the enemy's works evacuated. I immediately ordered the One hundred and twenty-first Ohio to occupy North Rome. May 19 to 23, remained in camp near Rome. May 23, crossed at the mouth to the south side of the Etowah River. May 24, marched toward Dallas. May 25, reached Dallas. May 26, no change. May 27, in forming line a gap of two and a half miles was discovered between General Hooker's right and the left of General McPherson. Under orders, I detailed the Thirty-fourth Illinois to find the line and complete the connection between these two wings of the army. The dangerous duty was performed with eminent satisfaction, though the colonel, with a small squad of his men, passed at one time through the enemy's picket-line. By midnight the entire line was perfect. May 28, 29, and 30, position unchanged. May 31, relieved by brigade of General Sweeny's division.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 139 (search)
ng but little acquainted with the locality, led me near the enemy's line, and judging by the firing that we were going too far to the right, I sent out skirmishers, who soon developed the Fifty-seventh Alabama (rebel) Infantry ill our front. A hurried movement to the left and rear was the only means of avoiding capture; as it was, 2 men, who fell out on the march, were captured by the enemy. We then moved around to near the hospital of the Twentieth Army Corps, from where I reported to General Hooker, who ordered me to go into camp for the night. On reporting to him in the morning for instructions he sent a staff officer to show me to the right of General Butterfield's line. Starting from this point I deployed the whole line, connecting the two forces by a sparse skirmish or picket-line, holding this position with a short intermission until the morning of June 1, when a regiment of General Dodge's command relieved mine. From this time until June 15 we did nothing beyond the ordina
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 142 (search)
, our front covered by skirmishers. We then advanced through a dense undergrowth of pine until night-fall, when we stopped and intrenched. In the morning, the enemy having disappeared, we encamped north of the city. On the 23d moved across the Oostenaula, through Rome, and then across the Etowah. 24th and 25th, marched to Dallas. 26th, remained in camp. 27th, the brigade took position on the left of the Army of the Tennessee. 28th, were deployed as skirmishers, connecting McPherson and Hooker. 29th, returned to our former position. 30th, position unchanged. 31st, relieved and marched to the left. June 1, moved still farther to the left, and relieved a part of the Twenty-third Army Corps. 2d and 3d, position unchanged. 4th, relieved by a part of General Whitaker's brigade. 5th, moved to the left and relieved a part of General Williams' division, Twentieth Army Corps. 6th, went into position west of Big Shanty and remained until the 10th, when we advanced facing to the sou
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 143 (search)
arrived at Cave Spring and camped for the night; Private Samuel Henry, Company G, was wounded by the premature discharge of his gun. Moved on the 25th and bivouacked near Dallas, Ga. On the 27th moved into position and intrenched a line on the left of the Fifteenth Corps, on what is called the Dallas line. On the 28th and 29th occupied the trenches; no casualties, though the enemy shelled our line. On the 30th the regiment was deployed as skirmishers across a gap of over a mile between General Hooker's right and General Davis' left; was relieved on the morning of the 31st by the Thirty-fourth Illinois, and returned to the trenches of the 27th. On the 31st Maj. John Yager, who was on duty in Ohio, returned and joined the command. On the 1st of June the army abandoned the right of the Dallas line, our division moving to the left and relieving a division of the Twenty-third Corps, the One hundred and twenty-first Ohio occupying the front line of temporary works erected by the Twent
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 151 (search)
sion went into line on the right a little to the south of the village, where it remained during the night. On the morning of the 8th the division moved south three miles upon the Villanow road, so as to form a connection with the corps of Major-General Hooker and at the same time to cover the right flank of Brigadier-General Johnson, who was swinging forward onto the south end of Tunnel Hill ridge. In the afternoon we crossed that ridge and moved up in support of Brigadier-Generals Johnson andch remained to garrison Ringgold, came up and was placed in reserve behind the other brigades. On the morning of the 15th my division was withdrawn from the line and sent to the extreme right of the corps to aid in filling a gap caused by Major-General Hooker being taken out to operate on the left of Major-General Schofield. I there connected on my right with the left of the Fifteenth Corps of the Army of the Tennessee. The position was an important one, and my men worked industriously during
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Narrative. (search)
rched on the morning of the 7th to Tunnel Hill. The other two divisions of the corps being in advance, had already brushed away with their advanced guards the pickets of the enemy at that place, and had gone into position when we arrived. This division went into line on the right a little to the south of the village, where it remained during the night. On the morning of the 8th the division moved south three miles upon the Villanow road, so as to form a connection with the corps of Major-General Hooker and at the same time to cover the right flank of Brigadier-General Johnson, who was swinging forward onto the south end of Tunnel Hill ridge. In the afternoon we crossed that ridge and moved up in support of Brigadier-Generals Johnson and Davis, then in front of Buzzard Roost Gap. May 9, 10, and 11, during these days we remained in our position in reserve, no active operations being carried on in our front. May 12, my division, in advance of the corps, marched at daybreak toward the
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Resaca. (search)
ualties May 14, 1864-killed, 2 officers and 14 enlisted men; wounded, 7 officers and 112 enlisted men; total, 9 officers and 126 enlisted men. During the day the Third Brigade, with the exception of the Eighteenth Kentucky Volunteer Infantry, which remained to garrison Ringgold, came up and was placed in reserve behind the other brigades. On the morning of the 15th my division was withdrawn from the line and sent to the extreme right of the corps to aid in filling a gap caused by Major-General Hooker being taken out to operate on the left of Major-General Schofield. I there connected on my right with the left of the Fifteenth Corps of the Army of the Tennessee. The position was an important one, and my men worked industriously during the day and following night in advancing and strengthening our works, so as to give more perfect command of those of the enemy in our front. Our skirmishers were during this time hotly engaged with those of the rebels. May 16, during the night the
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 156 (search)
fter a very severe fight, in which Davis' brigade suffered terribly, but fortunately my regiment escaped almost unharmed, 3 men only being wounded; yet the firing was very heavy, but upon my part of the line they mostly overshot us. The names of the wounded appear in the list. The next day was spent in advancing our lines and fortifying. Toward evening heavy fighting was heard on our left. The attack was intended for our corps, but they struck the line too far to our left and encountered Hooker's, Howard's, and one brigade of Johnson's forces, where they got most decently thrashed. On the night of the 21st the enemy again fell back, and on the next morning it was officially stated in camp that Atlanta was evacuated. We moved upon the place with high hopes and firm step, but when within some three miles of there it was ascertained that it was all a ruse of the enemy; that they still held the place, but had so managed as to make some of our superior officers believe that they had l
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 162 (search)
ing all day. June 21, relieved from skirmish line and take position in first line of works. June 22, moved at dark short distance to the right; took up position in second line of works. June 26, moved at dark one and a half miles to the right; bivouacked for the night. June 27, moved to the right three-fourths of a mile from line, and rest on arms; enemy shelling furiously; bivouacked for the night. June 30, moved at dark to the right and front one-half mile, and relieve a portion of General Hooker's troops; bivouacked behind the works. July 2, greater part of the regiment went on skirmish line. July 3, rebels evacuated Kenesaw in the night; we moved toward Marietta, striking the Atlanta and Marietta road to the right of that place; bivouacked for the night, having marched some five miles. July 4, advanced one-half mile; bivouacked in line. July 5, marched some five miles and bivouacked on the railroad near Chattahoochee River. July 6, threw up works. July 9, advanced our li
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