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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 173 3 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 159 3 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 154 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 151 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 149 1 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 139 1 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 137 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 135 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 120 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 119 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3.. You can also browse the collection for James Longstreet or search for James Longstreet in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., A reply to General Longstreet. (search)
my opinion, I can confidently recommend Generals Longstreet and Jackson, in this army. My opinion Lee of undue partiality to Georgia in making Longstreet his senior lieutenant, as it is to accuse hil army, decided to follow up the fight. General Longstreet advised a movement across Meade's front issue of battle was still to be tried. General Longstreet begs the question when he assumes that Me 1st (not on the forenoon of the 2d, as General Longstreet has it) he decided, after a conference whe attack early next day from his right with Longstreet's two divisions that were within reach, this and Long's Memoirs of Lee. ) Fourth. General Longstreet would have us infer that he was not ordell that day, he said (in Long's presence) to Longstreet and Hill: Gentlemen, we will attack the enemshowed next morning, as early as 9 A. M., at Longstreet's delay. General Longstreet is wrong, too, General Longstreet is wrong, too, in giving the impression that his divisions were fifteen or twenty miles away on the night of the 1s[2 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The great charge and artillery fighting at Gettysburg. (search)
to open the ball. At 1:30 P. M. a courier dashed up in great haste, holding a little slip of paper, torn evidently from a memorandum-book, on which, written in pencil and addressed to Colonel Walton, was the following: headquarters, July 3d, 1863. Colonel: Let the batteries open. Order great care and precision in firing. If the batteries at the Peach Orchard cannot be used against the point we intend attacking, let them open on the enemy on the rocky hill. Most respectfully, J. Longstreet, Lieutenant-General Commanding. The order to fire the signal-gun was immediately communicated to Major Eshleman, commanding the Washington Artillery, and the report of the first gun rang out upon the still summer air. There was a moment's delay with the second gun, a friction-primer having failed to explode. It was but a little space of time, but a hundred thousand men were listening. Finally a puff of smoke was seen at the Peach Orchard, then came a roar and a flash, and 138 piece
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The cavalry battle near Gettysburg. (search)
ho hurried forward the troops in their long and painful marches northward, and who threw the veteran corps of the Potomac upon the invading army? Widely spread as the Confederate army was when General Meade took command of the Union forces,--Longstreet at Chambersburg, Ewell at Carlisle and York,--it was a matter of course that the serious collision should be a surprise to one or the other party, and that accident should determine which should encounter its antagonist with the advantage in cocommander furnished any indication of his purpose. But on the same day, General Lee, having the evening before learned of the crossing of the Potomac by Hooker, recalled his advanced divisions from Carlisle and York, and threw forward Hill and Longstreet, with a view to a concentration at Gettysburg. During the 30th the two armies continued rapidly to approach each other, until, on the morning of the 1st of July, a stunning collision took place between the heads of Lee's columns and our left w
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 4.58 (search)
ave done so with perfect ease at any moment. Longstreet's advice to Lee [to move from his right uponcupied, which ought to have been occupied by Longstreet before we could get there with the Fifth CorI was unsupported for two hours in resisting Longstreet's assault. After General Meade had brought General Meade was surprised by the attack of Longstreet, on the Union left, on the afternoon of the were made by the commanding general to meet Longstreet's assault. There was no order of battle. Ge afternoon of July 2d, a few moments before Longstreet opened his assault, Meade telegraphed to Hal divisions of his center and left to support Longstreet's assault. These dispositions made by Genercupied, which ought to have been occupied by Longstreet before we could get there with the Fifth Cormy troops in position in front of Round Top, Longstreet would have occupied it at any time during thck to 6 :30 had arrived three hours earlier, Longstreet's assault on the second would have been repu
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The Confederate retreat from Gettysburg. (search)
ot joists to build boats with, and in twenty-four hours had enough of them ready to float down to Falling Waters and construct a bridge. As we were talking General Longstreet came into the tent, wet and muddy, and was cordially greeted by General Lee in this wise: Well, my old warhorse, what news do you bring us from the front? of alleged ill feeling between the two men growing out of affairs at Gettysburg. It has been said that if Stonewall Jackson had been in command at Gettysburg, Longstreet would have been shot. This is a monstrous imputation upon General Lee, no less than upon Longstreet, and utterly without foundation, in my opinion. They were Longstreet, and utterly without foundation, in my opinion. They were surely cordial on the 9th of July, 1863. Before I had gone two miles on my anxious march toward Winchester a courier overtook me with a note from General Lee directing me to return immediately to his headquarters. I halted my column, hurried back, was ferried over the river, and galloped out on the Hagerstown road to where I h
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., A prisoner's march from Gettysburg to Staunton. (search)
ok their place were nearer my conception of the Southern soldier. But I must not blame the poor fellows if they had not the kindness and elasticity of the cavalry. They were out of heart a large part of their division had been left on the field on the 3d of July, and besides the commander of the division there was only one officer above the rank of captain left in it. We were halted by the roadside often during the day to let Confederate troops hurry past us. In one of these halts General Longstreet was pointed out to me with evident pride by a staff-officer who had turned aside to make some courteous remarks to me. I told the officer as politely as I could that I thought they were badly beaten, and would hardly get across the Potomac. He laughed and said that they were not trying to get across,--that Baltimore was their objective point just then; from there, he explained, it was but a forced march to Washington, and once there they could conquer a peace in thirty days. His hopes
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Gettysburg, Pa., July 1st-3d, 1863. (search)
Me., Lieut. Edwin B. Dow; A, Md., Capt. James H. Rigby; 1st N. J., Lieut. Augustin N. Parsons; G, 1st N. Y., Capt. Nelson Ames; K, 1st N. Y. (11th N. Y. attached), Capt. Robert H. Fitzhugh. Brigade loss: k, 2; w, 34 = 36. Train Guard: 4th N. J. (7 co's), Maj. Charles Ewing. The total loss of the Union army was 3072 killed, 14,497 wounded, and 5434 captured or missing = 23,003. The Confederate army. Army of Northern Virginia--General Robert E. Lee. First Army Corps, Lieut.-Gen. James Longstreet. Mclaws's division, Maj.-Gen. Lafayette McLaws. Kershaw's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Joseph B. Kershaw: 2d S. C., Col. J. D. Kennedy (w), Lieut.-Col. F. Gaillard; 3d S. C., Maj. R. C. Maffett, Col. J. D. Nance; 7th S. C., Col. D. Wyatt Aiken; 8th S. C., Col. J. W. Henagan; 15th S. C., Col. W. G. De Saussure (k), Maj. William M. Gist; 3d S. C. Battalion, Lieut.-Col. W. G. Rice. Brigade loss: k, 115; w, 483; m, 32= 630. Semmes's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Paul J. Semmes (m w), Col. Goode Brya
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 7.83 (search)
zed the feeling it would excite against himself, but that he felt that the urgent exactions of discipline made General Polk's arrest absolutely requisite. The arrest was therefore made, but it was not sustained by the Richmond authorities. It is hardly necessary to say that the incident deepened General Bragg's unpopularity with his army, while the feeling between his two corps commanders and himself grew from bad to worse. On the eve of the battle of Chickamauga hi s relations with General Longstreet were no better than with the other two.--D. U. To vindicate himself, General Bragg at once made an official report of the battle of the 31st of December, especially in relation to the miscarriage of the effort to break the enemy's center. In his report General Bragg says, in part: To meet our successful advance and retrieve his losses in the front of his left, the enemy early transferred a portion of his reserve from his left to that flank, and by 2 o'clock had succeeded i
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 8.89 (search)
s division, about 5000, was the only part of Longstreet's corps in the action of the 19th.--D. H. H. divisions of McLaws and Hood. Lee followed Longstreet to his horse to see him off, and as he was me always called the Federals those people. ) Longstreet said, General, if you will give your orders and placed in reserve. Kershaw's brigade of Longstreet's corps was also out of place, and was put i began the flank movement to the right. General Longstreet adopted the plan of his lieutenant, and s, were all he had to confront the forces of Longstreet, until Steedman's division of Granger's corp63. Bushrod Johnson's three brigades in Longstreet's center were the first to fill the gap lefthe troops of Polk's wing, that he could give Longstreet no reenforcements, and that his headquartersll's had not been in action that day. General Longstreet wrote to me in July, 1884: It is my tmost alacrity, though they had not heard of Longstreet's success, and they showed by their cheerful[15 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 8.91 (search)
patiently awaiting the signal for attack. Longstreet's troops were placed in column of brigades athout immediate support. The sudden rush of Longstreet's compact column through the forest had foilhared the general fate of the right. When Longstreet struck the right, Rosecrans was near McCook re beaten in detail. Thirty minutes earlier Longstreet would have met well-organized resistance. Te formed beyond his column of attack. But Longstreet had now swept away all organized opposition s's. Three had been cut off and swept away. Longstreet's force separated them. He says he urged Br repeating-rifles. They did splendid work. Longstreet told Wilder after the war that the steady anhesitated. By the time he was ready to turn Longstreet's force against Thomas, valuable time had el the enemy. The Union line held the crest. Longstreet was stayed at last. Gathering new forces, hdon Granger and the right was saved. When Longstreet first struck our right I was hurrying toward[2 more...]
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