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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 5. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 1 1 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 1, April, 1902 - January, 1903 1 1 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 1 1 Browse Search
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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 49: letters to Europe.—test oath in the senate.—final repeal of the fugitive-slave act.—abolition of the coastwise slave-trade.—Freedmen's Bureau.—equal rights of the colored people as witnesses and passengers.—equal pay of colored troops.—first struggle for suffrage of the colored people.—thirteenth amendment of the constitution.— French spoliation claims.—taxation of national banks.— differences with Fessenden.—Civil service Reform.—Lincoln's re-election.—parting with friends.—1863-1864. (search)
s researches and labors in other lines of discussion and business were by themselves equal to those of senators who were deemed faithful and industrious. It was perhaps the most arduous session in which he served, and his friends feared that the excessive strain would bring back his old malady. The work of the two committees of which he was chairman fell wholly upon him, and he diverged from these specialties to take up many other topics which invited investigation. He wrote to Lieber, February 14:— I am tired. At this moment I have two important questions,—first, the capitalization of the duties paid by our commerce on the Scheldt, on which I expect to speak to-day in executive session; and secondly, a bill to pay five millions for French spoliations, on which I am now drawing a report. To these add business of all kinds, and the various questions of slavery and of England, and I wish for a day of rest. Lord Lyons said to him at this time, You do take good care of my tr
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 56: San Domingo again.—the senator's first speech.—return of the angina pectoris.—Fish's insult in the Motley Papers.— the senator's removal from the foreign relations committee.—pretexts for the remioval.—second speech against the San Domingo scheme.—the treaty of Washington.—Sumner and Wilson against Butler for governor.—1870-1871. (search)
ut a grateful recognition from Whitelaw Reid and other journalists. May 18 and 27 (Works, vol. XIV. pp. 284-305). In this case Messrs. White and Ramsdell, having obtained and published a copy of the Treaty of Washington before its promulgation, refused to disclose by what means it was obtained. Other subjects to which the senator rave attention at this session were a bill for the relief of N. P. Trist, negotiator of the Treaty of Guadaloupe Hidalgo, which he succeeded in carrying, Feb. 3, 14 (Congressional Globe, pp. 923, 1212, 1216. 1217), and March 13 and April 19 (Globe, pp. 69, 74, 809)); representation at an international penitentiary congress, March 7 (Globe, p. 13); the removal of the distinction in legislation between acts and resolutions, March 15 (Globe, pp. 113, 120); and the payment of claims for French spoliations, to which he invoked the attention of his successor, Mr. Cameron, March 13 (Globe, p. 66). At this as at the previous session, being the oldest senator in c
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 12: Greece and other lands 1867; aet. 48 (search)
odoxy.... Of that which is not clear one cannot have a clear idea. My reading in Fichte to-day is of the most confused. February 7. Chev came dancing in to tell me that Flossy is engaged to David Hall. His delight knew no bounds. I am also pleased, for David is of excellent character and excellent blood, the Halls being firstrate people and with no family infirmity (insanity or blindness). My only regret is that it must prove a long engagement, David being a very young lawyer. February 14. All's up, as I feared, with Northern Lights in its present form. Gilmour proposes to go to New York and to change its form and character to that of a weekly newspaper. I of course retire from it and, indeed, despite my title of editor, have been only a reader of manuscripts and contributor — nothing more. I have not had power of any sort to make engagements. The tenth number of Northern Lights was also the last, and we hear no more of the ill-fated magazine. The Journal says not
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 12: Stepping westward 1901-1902; aet. 82-83 (search)
Pope Leo would do. February 13.... Felt greatly discouraged at first waking. It seemed impossible for me to make a first move under so many responsibilities. A sudden light came into my soul at the thought that God will help me in any good undertaking, and with this there came an inkling of first steps to be taken with regard to Sig. Leoni's parchment. That is, to have it bought by some public society. I went to work again on my prize poem, with better success than hitherto ... February 14. Philosophy at Mrs. Bullard's.... Sent off my prize poem with scarcely any hope of its obtaining or indeed deserving the prize, but Mar An editor. has promised to pay me something for it in any case, and I was bound to try for the object, namely, a good civic poem . . February 15.... A day of great pleasure, profit and fatigue ... Griggs's lecture.... The address on Erasmus and Luther was very inspiring. Griggs is in the full tide of youthful inspiration and gives himself to his au
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 14: the sundown splendid and serene 1906-1907; aet. 87-88 (search)
d him: Robert, what is religion? He replied, To love God with all one's heart, Christ helping us. He began his prayer last Sunday thus: Our Father who art in heaven, on earth, and in hell! On April 13, she was out for the first time since February 14, when I returned sick from Baltimore ... . Another week and she was at her church, for the first time since January 18. It had been a long and weary time, yet one remembers not so much the suffering and confinement as the gayety of it. T — the theme attracts me much. If I give it, I will have Whittier's hymn sung: Oh! sometimes gleams upon our sight-- Wrote to thank Higginson for sending me word that I am the first woman member of the society of American Authors..... February 14. Luncheon at 3 Joy Street. .My seat was between T. W. H. and President Eliot, with whom I had not spoken in many years. He spoke to me at once and we shook hands and conversed very cordially. I had known his father quite well — a lover of m
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments., Fiftieth regiment Massachusetts Infantry (Militia). (search)
––––––––39 Enlisted men, Including non-commissioned staff.5–95888097849188928697–903 Totals,–––––––––––––942 The 50th Infantry, Mass. Volunteer Militia, had for its nucleus the 7th Regiment Mass. Militia, made up of men from Essex and Middlesex counties. Recruited to the required numbers at Camp Edwin M. Stanton, Boxford, it left camp under Col. Carlos P. Messer for New York November 19, to become part of General Banks' forces in the Department of the Gulf. Owing to the lack of means of transportation, it was sent to Louisiana by detachments, and Company I, sailing December 1, arrived much in advance of the others and was attached to the 30th Mass. Infantry at Baton Rouge until the arrival of companies A, E and K, about February 5. The remaining six companies, leaving Philadelphia January 9, were separated at Fortress Monroe, and companies C, F and G were enabled to join the detachment at Baton Rouge February 14; but the remain
d administrator 1 May 1770; Lucy, prob. m. Abraham Watson 28 Mar. 1751; John. All these children are named in their father's will 6 Dec. 1736. Nathaniel the f. d. 27 Feb. 1736-7, a. about 38. 16. Solomon, s. of Solomon (9), grad. H. C. 1727, settled in the ministry at Grafton 1731, m. Sarah, dau. of Nathaniel Sartell of Groton, 26 Oct. 1732, and had Solomon, b. 29 Oct. 1733, killed in blasting a well 25 Oct. 1747; Nathaniel Sartell, b. 8 Dec. 1735, settled at Alstead, N. H.; Sarah, b. 14 Feb. and d. 2 Mar. 1737-8; John, b. 24 Feb. 1738-9, d. in Auburn, 26 Feb. 1812; Sarah, b. 29 Nov. 1740, d. young; Henry, b. 17 Nov. 1742; Sarah, b. 1 July 1744; Lydia, b. 22 May 1746; Solomon, b. 13 Aug. 1748, d. at Edenton, N. C.; Mary, b. 12 Aug. 1751, m. Amos Binney of Hull, and was mother of the late Amos Binney, Navy Agent at Boston. Rev. Mr. Prentice was dismissed from his charge at Grafton 10 July 1747, on account of his favoring the preaching of Whitefield. He afterwards preached in Ea
d administrator 1 May 1770; Lucy, prob. m. Abraham Watson 28 Mar. 1751; John. All these children are named in their father's will 6 Dec. 1736. Nathaniel the f. d. 27 Feb. 1736-7, a. about 38. 16. Solomon, s. of Solomon (9), grad. H. C. 1727, settled in the ministry at Grafton 1731, m. Sarah, dau. of Nathaniel Sartell of Groton, 26 Oct. 1732, and had Solomon, b. 29 Oct. 1733, killed in blasting a well 25 Oct. 1747; Nathaniel Sartell, b. 8 Dec. 1735, settled at Alstead, N. H.; Sarah, b. 14 Feb. and d. 2 Mar. 1737-8; John, b. 24 Feb. 1738-9, d. in Auburn, 26 Feb. 1812; Sarah, b. 29 Nov. 1740, d. young; Henry, b. 17 Nov. 1742; Sarah, b. 1 July 1744; Lydia, b. 22 May 1746; Solomon, b. 13 Aug. 1748, d. at Edenton, N. C.; Mary, b. 12 Aug. 1751, m. Amos Binney of Hull, and was mother of the late Amos Binney, Navy Agent at Boston. Rev. Mr. Prentice was dismissed from his charge at Grafton 10 July 1747, on account of his favoring the preaching of Whitefield. He afterwards preached in Ea
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 7: (search)
with their formal air, who were walking about in the vast corridors. It was, however, all monkish, as much as if it had been in Austria or Rome; and I could not but feel that it was all out of joint with the spirit of the times, in France at least. I recollected our conversation at de Broglie's the other evening, and could not but think, if the Catholic religion requires for its support such establishments as this, it can hardly be suited to France, or likely to make progress there. February 14.—Divided a long evening between Thierry and the de Broglies. Poor Thierry was in bed, suffering more than usual; but two or three friends were with him, and he showed how completely his spirits and animation are indomitable. At de Broglie's all was as brilliant as luxury, rank, and talent could make it. The contrast was striking, and not without its obvious meaning; yet both were interesting, and I enjoyed both. February 15.—A formal, luxurious, splendid dinner at Ternaux's, where we
f the department of the South, July, 1862, to Jan. 16, 1865; charged with the organization and recruiting of colored troops, Aug, 1862, to Jan., 1865. In command of the district of Beaufort, S. C., Feb., 1863, to Jan., 1865. Commissioner of military reservations, etc., Nov., 1863, to Jan., 1865. Brevet Maj. General, U. S. Volunteers, Jan. 12, 1865. Inspector of the settlements and plantations, department of the South, Jan. 16 to May 18, 1865. Superintendent of volunteer recruiting service, Feb. 14 to May 18, 1865. Brevet Major, Lieut. Colonel, Colonel, U. S. Army, Mar. 13, 1865. Brevet Brig. General, U. S. Army, Apr. 9, 1865. Assistant Commissioner, Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen and Abandoned Lands for the states of South Carolina and Georgia, May 18, 1865, and of the state of Florida, June 8, 1865, to Jan. 9, 1866. Mustered out of volunteer service, Jan. 15, 1866. Major, staff, Quartermaster, July 29, 1866. Lieut. Colonel, staff, Deputy Q. M. General, June 6, 1872. Colonel, staff,
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