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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, West Virginia Volunteers. (search)
Creek August 12. Charlestown August 22-24. Halltown August 26. Berryville September 3-4. Battle of Opequan, Winchester, September 19. Fisher's Hill September 22. Battle of Cedar Creek October 19. Ordered to Cumberland, Md., October 29, and duty there till December. Consolidated with 4th West Virginia Infantry to form 2nd West Virginia Veteran Infantry December 10, 1864. Regiment lost during service 3 Officers and 51 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 2 Officeiss., July 5-10. Siege of Jackson July 10-17. At Big Black River till September 26. Moved to Memphis, Tenn., thence march to Chattanooga, Tenn., September 26-November 20. Operations on Memphis & Charleston Railroad in Alabama October 20-29. Brier Creek, Tuscumbia, October 27. Chattanooga-Ringgold Campaign November 23-27. Tunnel Hill November 23-24. Mission Ridge November 25. Pursuit to Graysville November 26-27. March to relief of Knoxville, Tenn., November 28-Decem
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Wisconsin Volunteers. (search)
r, October 25. Newtonia October 28. Drywood October 29. Company A changed to Company K, Company C to e Memphis & Charleston Railroad in Alabama October 20-29. Chattanooga-Ringgold Campaign November 23-27. n Memphis & Charleston Railroad in Alabama October 20-29. Chattanooga-Ringgold Campaign November 23-27. er. Repulse of Hood's attack on Decatur October 26-29. At Stevenson till December. At Huntsville tilln Memphis & Charleston Railroad in Alabama October 20-29. Chattanooga-Ringgold Campaign November 23-27. October 27. Re-opening Tennessee River October 27-29. Battle of Wauhatchie October 28-29. Duty in Lo29. Duty in Lookout Valley till November 22. Chattanooga-Ringgold Campaign November 23-27. Orchard Knob November 23. St. Louis, Mo., thence to relief of Paducah, Ky., October 29. Moved to St. Louis December 6-10, and join baition from Atlanta to Tuckum's Cross Roads October 26-29. March to the sea November 15-December 10. Harr
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, United States--Regular Army. (search)
mber 23. Reopening Tennessee River October 26-29. Battles of Chattanooga November 23-27. Atll October 29. Movement to Falmouth, Va., October 29-November 19. Battle of Fredericksburg Dec Ford September 19-20. At Sharpsburg till October 29. Kearneysville and Shepherdstown October Ford September 19-20. At Sharpsburg till October 29. Kearneysville and Shepherdstown October ll October 29. Movement to Falmouth, Va., October 29-November 19. Snicker's Gap November 3. September 19-20. At Sharpsburg, Md., till October 29. Kearneysville and Shepherdstown October mber 23. Reopening Tennessee River October 26-29. Battles of Chattanooga November 23-25. Ormber 23. Reopening Tennessee River October 26-29. Battles of Chattanooga November 23-25. Ormber 23. Reopening Tennessee River October 26-29. Battles of Chattanooga November 23-27. Ormber 23. Reopening Tennessee River October 26-29. Battles of Chattanooga November 23-27; Orcha[13 more...]
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, United States Volunteers. (search)
6-22. Battle of South Mountain September 14. Battle of Antietam September 16-17. Sharpsburg, Shepherdstown Ford, September 19. Movement to Falmouth October 29-November 17. Battle of Fredericksburg, Va., December 12-15. Expedition from Potomac Creek to Richard's and Ellis' Fords, Rappahannock River, December 29-3t 29; Bull Run August 30. Maryland Campaign September 6-22. Battles of South Mountain September 14; Antietam September 16-17. Camp near Sharpsburg till October 29. Movement to Falmouth, Va., October 29-November 17. Battle of Fredericksburg December 12-15. Mud March January 20-24, 1863. At Falmouth till April. October 29-November 17. Battle of Fredericksburg December 12-15. Mud March January 20-24, 1863. At Falmouth till April. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Battle of Chancellorsville May 1-5. Gettysburg (Pa.) Campaign June 11-July 24. Battle of Gettysburg, Pa., July 1-3. Pursuit of Lee July 5-24. Action at Wapping Heights, Va., July 23. Bristoe Campaign October 9-22. Auburn and Bristoe October 14. Advance to line of
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, United States Colored Troops. (search)
July 31. Baylor's Farm June 15. Assaults on Petersburg June 16-19. Siege of Petersburg and Richmond June 16, 1864, to February 18, 1865. Duty before Petersburg till July, 1864. Moved to Deep Bottom July 25. Action at Deep Bottom July 27-28. Strawberry Plains, Deep Bottom, August 14-18. Actions at Deep Bottom September 2 and 6. Chaffin's Farm September 29-30. Barbytown Road October 7. Battle of Fair Oaks, Darbytown Road October 27-28. Near Richmond October 28-29. Duty in trenches north of James River till February, 1865. Ordered to Norfolk February 18. Duty in District of Eastern Virginia at Norfolk, Suffolk, etc., till May. Ordered to City Point, Va.; thence sailed for Texas June 10. Duty on the Rio Grande and at various points in Texas till February, 1866. Mustered out February 12, 1866. 3rd United States Colored Regiment Cavalry Organized from 1st Mississippi Cavalry (African Descent) March 11, 1864. Attached to 1st Briga
fences of Washington. Two unattached companies, respectively commanded by Captain Kenny and Captain Brigham, were sent forward to Washington, for the same service. Captain Brigham's company left the State Sept. 26; and Captain Kenny's company, Oct. 29. In-addition to the above, 1,247 men were mustered in for ninety days service. On the 4th of July, Congress passed an act allowing credits to be given for men in the naval service who had entered during the Rebellion. This was one of the g to have in his command a corps composed entirely of them. He said the slave negroes make the best soldiers. The evening I passed pleasantly around the camp-fire with the officers, and Mr. Merriam, the correspondent of the New-York Herald. Oct. 29.—After breakfasting with the General, and hearing him examine a secesh widow, who owned a large farm in the vicinity, and who asked to be furnished rations during the winter, although she has a son in the rebel army, I bade good-by to him and hi
. howitzer, U. S. 3-inch Ord. And 12-Pdr. Lt. U. S. total artillery. artillery carriages and limbers. caissons. artillery harness, lead and wheel sets for two horses. anvils. Enfield rifled muskets. Springfield rifled muskets. guns, Assorted. carbines, Assorted. Austrian rifles. cartridge boxes. total small arms. Washington Arsenal October 192       12         1 1   16                       Washington Arsenal October 25                   1     1                       Washington Arsenal October 29 4 8 7 1 2 2             24                       Washington Arsenal November 7               10         10                       Washington Arsenal November 14         1       1       2                       Washington Arsenal November 17   1     1               2                       Washington Arsenal November 18           1 1           2              
the soil of Virginia. The unfortunate General McClellan fell under the ban of his government, and was superseded by General Burnside. The Federal army moved slowly southward from the Potomac to the Rappahannock, while the Confederates made a corresponding march through the Valley of Virginia, crossed the Blue Ridge, and placed themselves on the south side of the last named river. We quote from the notes of Rev. J. W. Mills, who fully participated in all the hardships of the army: October 29th.-Orders just received from headquarters to cook two days rations, and be in readiness to march in the morning at an early hour. All is anxiety — no one knows whither we are to move. Are we to cross the Potomac and attack the Yankees? Or are we to go southwards to some point of railroad communication with home and friends? These are questions of importance to us. I hear men saying: Well, I will go anywhere I am ordered. In this long march many of the soldiers suffered greatly for wa
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 19: at Bolivar Heights. (search)
s to be seen. They were probably more careful afterward what they used to cook on. On Oct. 16, about fifteen regiments of infantry, besides cavalry and artillery, moved out toward Charlestown, and soon afterward heavy firing was heard in that direction. On the following day the men of the Nineteenth Massachusetts received orders to provide a day's rations and forty rounds of cartridges and to hold themselves in readiness to move at a moment's notice. Nothing however, developed until Oct. 29, when three days rations and sixty rounds of cartridges were issued, and on the following morning tents were struck and everything made in readiness for a march. The Roster on October 31 was as follows: Commissioned officers present,20 On special duty,1 In arrest,1 22 Enlisted men, present for duty,325 On extra or daily duty,30 Sick,27 382 Commissioned officers absent, Wounded, with leave,8 Without leave,2 Sick,3 13 Enlisted men absent, On detached Service,1 With leave
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 20: to Falmouth, in pursuit of Lee. Burnside supersedes McClellan. (search)
Chapter 20: to Falmouth, in pursuit of Lee. Burnside supersedes McClellan. At 2 P. M. on Oct. 29 the Nineteenth regiment joined its brigade and took up the line of march for Falmouth, in pursuit of Lee. Gen. Couch was in command, Gen. Sumner having been granted leave of absence. The day was beautiful, the sun shining brightly in a clear sky and the air just cool enough to make marching comfortable. Not having drawn winter clothing, the men were not heavily encumbered and some were actually destitute of suitable covering for the frosty nights, but, thanks to the Virginia farmers, there were plenty of rail fences and fires were kept burning all night, around which gathered the insufficiently clad and they were thus kept from actual suffering during the first week. After that it was colder, with snow and rain storms, and all suffered more or less. The crops were not all harvested and that added to the comforts. Leaving camp soon after sunrise the brigade filed into the Cha
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