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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Geological survey of the United States, (search)
Geological survey of the United States, A branch of the Department of the Interior, founded in 1879, when it included only the geological examination of the Territories; but in 1881 it was enlarged so as to comprise the entire country, and its corps were gradually increased till the survey became the most important of all governmental organizations for the purpose of geological examination. The director of the survey has charge of the classification of the public lands, the examination of the geological structures, mineral resources, and products of the national domain, and of the survey of the forest reserves. In 1900 the chief officers were: Director, Charles D. Wolcott; Division of Hydrography, chief, F. H. Newell; Division of Mineral Resources, chief, David T. Day; Division of Physical and Chemical Re-:searches, chief, G. F. Becker; Division of Topography, Forest Reserves, Henry Gannett.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Georgia, (search)
pment, caused in large part by the introduction of cotton manufacturing. Its mills are among the largest in the world, and their output is steadily increasing. The State was the first to feel the life of the New South. The Cotton Expostition in 1881 and the Cotton States and International Exposition in 1895, both in Atlanta, showed to the world the practical accomplishments under the new order of things, and greatly stimulated all industrial efforts. In 1900 the assessed valuation of all taxoombs33d to 36th1853 to 1861 Alfred Iverson34th to 36th1855 to 1861 36th to 41st1861 to 1871 Joshua Hill41st to 42d 1871 to 1873 H. V. M. Miller41st1871 Thomas M. Norwood42d to 43d1871 to 1875 John B. Gordon43d to 46th1873 to 1881 Benjamin H. Hill45th to 47th1877 to 1882 Joseph E. Brown47th to 51st1881 to 1891 Pope Barrow47th1882 Alfred H. Colquitt48th to 53d1883 to 1894 John B. Gordon52d to 55th1891 to 1897 Augustus O. Bacon54th to ——1895 to —— Alexander S. Clay55th to —
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Gilder, William Henry 1838- (search)
Gilder, William Henry 1838- Explorer; born in Philadelphia, Pa., Aug. 16, 1838; served through the Civil War and received the brevet of major at its close. In 1878 he was appointed second in command of the expedition to King William's Land, and while so engaged made a sledge-journey of 3,251 statute miles, the longest on record. In 1881 he was with the Rodgers expedition to look for the Jeannette. After the Rodgers was burned he journeyed from Bering Strait across Siberia, a distance of 2,000 miles, in the depth of winter, and sent a despatch of the misfortune to the Secretary of the Navy. His publications include Schwatka's search, and Ice-pack and Tundra. He died in Morristown, N. J., Feb. 5, 1900.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Gorringe, Henry Honeychurch 1841-1885 (search)
Gorringe, Henry Honeychurch 1841-1885 Naval officer; born in Barbadoes, W. I., Aug. 11, 1841; came to the United States in early life; served through the Civil War with marked distinction; was promoted lieutenant-commander in December, 1868. He became widely known in 1880-81 through having charge of the transportation of the Egyptian obelisk (Cleopatra's Needle), presented to the United States by the Khedive of Egypt, and erected in Central Park, New York City, Jan. 23, 1881. The total cost of transportation— $100,000—was paid by William H. Vanderbilt. The iron vessel Dessoug was bought from the Egyptian government, and a hole was cut in her side, through which the obelisk was placed in the hold. Gorringe published a History of Egyptian Obelisks. He died in New York City, July 7. 1
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Grand army of the republic, the. (search)
aven, Conn., 1873; Charles Devens, Jr., Massachusetts. 8. Harrisburg, Pa., 1874; Charles Devens, Jr., Massachusetts. 9. Chicago, III., 1875; John F. Hartranft, Pennsylvania. 10. Philadelphia, Pa., 1876; John F. Hartranft, Pennsylvania. 11. Providence, R. I., 1877; John C. Robinson, New York. 12. Springfield, Mass., 1878; John C. Robinson, New York. 13. Albany, N. Y., 1879; William Earnshaw, Ohio. 14. Dayton, O., 1880; Louis Wagner, Pennsylvania. 15. Indianapolis, Ind., 1881; George S. Merrill, Massachusetts. 16. Baltimore, Md., 1882; Paul Van Der Voort, Nebraska. 17. Denver, Col., 1883; Robert B. Beatte, Pennsylvania. 18. Minneapolis, Minn., 1884; John S. Kountz, Ohio. 19. Portland, Me., 1885; S. S. Burdett, Washington. 20. San Francisco, Cal., 1886; Lucius Fairchild, Wisconsin. 21. St. Louis, Mo., 1887; John P. Rea, Minnesota. 22. Columbus, O., 1888; William Warner, Missouri. 23. Milwaukee, Wis., 1889; Russell A. Alger, Michigan. 24.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Grant, Frederick Dent 1850- (search)
50; eldest son of Ulysses S. Grant; was with his father at various times during the Civil War; graduated at the United States Military Academy in 1871; accompanied General Sherman on his European trip in 1872; was appointed aide-de-camp on the staff of General Sheridan with the rank of lieutenant-colonel in 1873; took Frederick Dent Grant. part in the campaign on the frontier against the Indians; accompanied his father on his trip around the world; and resigned his commission in the army in 1881. In 1887 he was defeated as Republican candidate for secretary of state of New York, and in 1889 President Harrison appointed him minister to Austria-Hungary, where he remained till 1893. He was a police commissioner in New York City through the administration of Mayor Strong. In 1898, on the call for volunteers for the war with Spain, Colonel Grant offered his services to the President, and went to the front as colonel of the 14th New York regiment. On May 27 he was appointed a brigadie
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Greely, Adolph Washington 1844- (search)
Greely, Adolph Washington 1844- Explorer; born in Newburyport, Mass., March 27, 1844; was liberally educated; and at the breaking out of the Civil War joined the volunteer army and served faithfully until the close of the strife, when he was commissioned a lieutenant in the regular army and assigned to the signal service. In 1881 he commanded an expedition sent into the arctic regions by the government to establish a series of circumpolar stations for scientific observations, in accordance with a plan of the International Geographical Congress held at Hamburg in 1879. He landed with his party of twenty-five at Discovery Harbor, in lat. 81° 44′ N., on Aug. 12, 1881. They made their permanent camp at Cape Sabine in October, 1883, where they suffered intensely for want of supplies which had failed to reach them. There all but six of the twenty-five died of starvation. The six, of whom Lieutenant Greely was one, were rescued by a relief party under Capt. Winfield S. Schley (q. v.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Grierson, Benjamin Henry 1826- (search)
royed 3,000 stand of arms, and inflicted a loss on their foes of property valued at $6,000,000. Grierson's loss was twenty-seven men and a number of horses. During the twenty-eight hours preceding the arrival of the raiders at Baton Rouge they had travelled 76 miles, engaged in four skirmishes, and forded the Comite River. Grierson declared that he found the Confederacy to be only a shell. This was in 1863. He was made major-general of volunteers in May, 1865, and for his services in the war was brevetted majorgeneral, United States army, in March, 1867. He had been commissioned lieutenant-colonel of United States cavalry in July, 1866. From 1868 till 1873 he was in command of the Indian Territory district, and was actively employed in campaigns against hostile Indians; and in 1873-81 was similarly engaged in western Texas and New Mexico. In 1886 he became commander of the District of New Mexico, and in 1890 he was retired with the rank of brigadier-general in the regular army.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hale, Eugene 1836- (search)
Hale, Eugene 1836- Lawyer; born in Turner, Me., June 9, 1836; admitted to the bar in 1857; was county attorney for Hancock county nine years; elected to the State legislature in 1867 and to Congress in 1869, where he served ten years. In 1881 He was elected to the United States Senate, and re-elected in 1887, 1893, and 1899.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hall, Granville Stanley 1845- (search)
lliams College in 1867. He served as professor of psychology in Antioch College, Ohio, in 1872-76. Later he studied in Bonn, Leipsic, Heidelberg, and Berlin. Returning, he lectured on psychology in Harvard University and Williams College in 1880-81. In 1881 he became Professor of Psychology in Johns Hopkins University, and remained there till 1888, when he accepted the presidency, with the chair of psychology, of Clark University. He is author of Aspects of German culture; Hints toward a seing, he lectured on psychology in Harvard University and Williams College in 1880-81. In 1881 he became Professor of Psychology in Johns Hopkins University, and remained there till 1888, when he accepted the presidency, with the chair of psychology, of Clark University. He is author of Aspects of German culture; Hints toward a select and descriptive bibliography of education (with John M. Mansfield), etc. In 1900 he was editor of The American journal of psychology and The Pedagogical Seminary.
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