hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 2,937 results in 154 document sections:

... 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 ...
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army, Chapter XV (search)
he army, cordially recommending the gallantry and skill of Major-General Schofield to the commendation of the War Department. Geo. H. Thoma20, 1865, appears the following: Directions were then sent to General Schofield to leave a sufficiently strong force for the defense of that gh Georgia. . . . My plans and wishes were fully explained to General Schofield, and, as subsequent events will show, properly appreciated anviously prepared, was so far modified, upon the suggestion of General Schofield and with the concurrence of other commanders, as to order thence to the right as I expected he would have done, I directed General Schofield to move his command (the Twenty-third Corps) from the positioeneral Thomas knew three days before the battle of Nashville that Schofield was playing the part of Judas by telegraphing to General Grant, ao stated that it was known to a number of our officers that . . . Schofield was intriguing with Grant to get Thomas relieved, in order that h
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army, Chapter XVIII (search)
mand of an army in the field. If so, his action afforded a patriotic example which some others would have done well to imitate. As I have before stated, General Halleck was always kind and just to me, so far as I ever knew, and I was much indebted to him for support when it was needed. Now I find in the records the following letter: Richmond, Va., May 10, 1865, 10:30 A. M. Hon. Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War: I beg leave to withdraw for the present my recommendation of Schofield as military governor of North Carolina. It is represented to me that he and General Blair were the principal advisers of Sherman in his armistice with the rebel General Johnston. If so, he is not a proper person to command in North Carolina. I therefore suspend my recommendation for further developments. H. W. Halleck, Major-General. The fact was that I had not been present when Sherman's memorandum was agreed upon, had not been consulted about it in any way, and knew nothing of
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army, Chapter XIX (search)
which they are accustomed. It is not well for them to congregate about towns or military camps. They will not be supported in idleness. By command of Major-General Schofield: J. A. Campbell, Assistant Adjutant-General. On the same day I issued the following: (General orders, no. 31.) Hdqrs. Dept. of North Carermaster's department. The needy will also be supplied, for the time being, with subsistence stores from the commissary department . . . By command of Major-General Schofield: J. A. Campbell, Assistant Adjutant-General. On May 4, I issued a circular to this effect: Local commanders and provost-marshals will encouse which may seem to require it, and to direct the superintendent to otherwise provide for the wards, in accordance with the above rules. By command of Major-General Schofield: J. A. Campbell, Assistant Adjutant-General. On May 29, General Grant, from Washington, ordered me to give every facility and encouragement to ge
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army, Chapter XX (search)
ll have to be learned to fix his determination, whether to go or not, has yet to be found out in Washington whilst I shall be away. This, however, I can say: Gen. Schofield's leave has been given with the concurrence of the President, he having full knowledge of the object. I have both written my views to the President and had cm convenient to be permitted to go into Mexico if they can be got into the hands of the defenders of the only Government we recognize in that country. I hope Gen. Schofield may go with orders direct to receive these articles; but if he does not, I know it will meet with general approbation to let him have them if contrary orders 4, 1865, addressed to Mr. Bigelow, and a letter of credit on the Barings, and requested me to proceed on my mission. In his letter to Mr. Bigelow he said: General Schofield proceeds to Paris. He is, I believe, fully informed of the feelings and sentiments, not only of this government, but of the American people. I commend him
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army, Chapter XXII (search)
ent; that I regarded the removal of Mr. Stanton, in the way it was done, as wrong and unwise; that I understood this proposition as coming originally from the Republican side of the Senate, and as being accepted by the President in the interest of peace, and for the purpose of securing harmony between the legislative and executive departments of the government, and a just and faithful administration of the laws, including the reconstruction acts. I added: And the President knows from General Schofield's acts what he means by this,—if, after these conditions have been fully stated to the President, he sends my name to the Senate, I will deem it my duty to say nothing on the subject of accepting or declining the appointment until the Senate has acted upon it. Mr. Evarts intimated that the above was satisfactory, and the interview then ended. I returned to Richmond on Thursday, April 23, being then in command in Virginia, executing the reconstruction acts. On the 24th the Presi
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army, Chapter XXV (search)
e history of the country, an effort was made to establish and develop a system of artillery fire control adapted to our fortifications and armament. In 1888 General Schofield succeeded General Sheridan in command of the army, and in December issued General Orders, No. 108 from the headquarters of the army. This order extended to ct supervision of the Board of Ordnance and Fortifications, which had been created by the Fortification Appropriation Act of September 22, 1888, and of which General Schofield was the president. The Army Regulations of 1889 were published on February 9, and paragraph 382 authorized the commanding general of each geographical divis the scientific use of the guns. By General Orders, No. 62, Headquarters of the Army, July 2, 1889, Lieutenant T. H. Bliss, First Artillery, Aide-de-Camp to General Schofield commanding, was announced as inspector of small arms and artillery practice. As an inducement to greater application on the part of the student officers of
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army, Chapter XXVIII (search)
so effective as to promptly suppress all resistance to lawful authority, and to stop the destruction of life the moment lawless resistance has ceased. Punishment belongs not to the troops, but to the courts of justice. By command of Major-General Schofield: Geo. D. Ruggles, Adjutant-General. (General orders, no. 15.) Headquarters of the army, adjutant-General's office, Washington, May 25, 1894. The following instructions are issued for the government of department commanderse directly responsible to their military superiors. Any unlawful or unauthorized act on their part would not be excusable on the ground of any order or request received by them from a marshal or any other civil officer. By command of Major-General Schofield: Geo. D. Ruggles, Adjutant-General. It appears to have been thought in Chicago that the request of the United States marshal, with whom the commanding officer of the troops had been directed to confer, was equivalent to orders of
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Spring Hill, engagement at (search)
Hill, in Maury county, Tenn., 10 miles from Franklin and 12 miles north of Columbia, between National troops under General Schofield and a Confederate army under General Hood. Hood had made a rapid march upon Columbia in the hope of gaining the rear of Schofield, then at Pulaski; but Schofield returned to Columbia, thus checking Hood's plan. For several days the two armies remained near each other at Columbia. On the 28th Hood made another attempt to gain Schofield's rear by a movement toSchofield returned to Columbia, thus checking Hood's plan. For several days the two armies remained near each other at Columbia. On the 28th Hood made another attempt to gain Schofield's rear by a movement to Spring Hill; but General Stanley, who was sent with his division and a large part of his artillery to Spring Hill, reached that place in time to prevent the Confederates from occupying it. During the afternoon of Nov. 29 Stanley's and Hood's advancSchofield's rear by a movement to Spring Hill; but General Stanley, who was sent with his division and a large part of his artillery to Spring Hill, reached that place in time to prevent the Confederates from occupying it. During the afternoon of Nov. 29 Stanley's and Hood's advanced troops had a considerable engagement, which resulted in further checking Hood's plans. At night the National troops left Spring Hill for Franklin, where a notable battle was fought. See Franklin, Battle of..
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
, 1865 Fort Anderson captured by Federals under General Cox......Feb. 18, 1865 Wilmington, N. C., captured by General Schofield......Feb. 22, 1865 Secretary of the Treasury authorized to borrow $600,000,000 on bonds at not exceeding 6 per courns sine die......March 18, 1865 Battle of Bentonville, N. C.......March 19, 1865 Armies of Sherman, Terry, and Schofield join at Goldsboro, N. C.......March 23, 1865 Battle of Five Forks, Va.......March 31–April 1, 1865 Richmond evacue die by vote of 34 to 16......May 26, 1868 Mr. Stanton resigns as Secretary of War, May 26, and is succeeded by General Schofield......May 30, 1868 Ex-President James Buchanan, born 1791, dies at Wheatland, Pa.......June 1, 1868 Gen. George Stoneman assigned to 1st Military District, to replace Schofield......June 1, 1868 Gen. Irvin McDowell appointed to command 4th Military District, Dec. 28, 1867, assumes his duties......June 4, 1868 Arkansas admitted to representation by Co
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), North Carolina, (search)
is rejected at Washington, April 21; General Grant arrives at Raleigh......April 24, 1865 Gen. J. E. Johnston surrenders to Sherman; agreement signed at Bennett's house, near Durham station......April 26, 1865 Maj.-Gen. J. M. Schofield, appointed to command the Department of North Carolina, makes his headquarters at Raleigh......April, 1865 William W. Holden proclaimed provisional governor of the State by President Johnson......May 29, 1865 Maj.-Gen. Thomas H. Ruger succeeds Schofield in command of the Department of North Carolina......June, 1865 Convention called by Provisional Governor Holden meets at Raleigh, Oct. 2, repeals the ordinance of secession, adopts an ordinance prohibiting slavery, Oct. 9, and adjourns......Oct. 19, 1865 People ratify the repeal of the ordinance of secession by 20,506 to 2,002, and the ordinance prohibiting slavery by 19,039 to 3,039......Nov. 7, 1865 Governor Holden is relieved of his trust by President Johnson, and Governor Wort
... 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 ...