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h to the evening of the 17th inst., which arrived by flag of truce. We give a summary of the news they contain: The Seymour-Lincoln correspondence. We find the following two last letters of the Seymour-Lincoln correspondence in the Northern papers: Seymour to Lincoln. Albany, Aug. 8, 1863. To the President of the United States --I received your communication of the 7th inst this day. While I recognize the concessions you make, I regret your refusal to comply with my rrities in favor of the other party. You cannot, and will not, fail to right these gross wrongs. Truly, yours, Horatio Seymour, Lincoln's reply. Executive Mansion, Washington, August 11, 1863. To His Excellency, Horatio, Seymour, GoverSeymour, Governor of New York: Yours of the 8th, with Judge Advocate General Waterbury's report, was received to-day, asking you to remember that I consider time as being very important both to the general case of the country and to the soldiers already in t
declare strongly for State rights, oppose the prosecution of the war for purposes of subjugation or emancipation, and the extension of martial law over States not in rebellion,--They declare that the war was the result of secession at the South and abolition at the North; and the democratic party would put down the one by the sword and the other by the ballot box. They pronounced the Conscription act unwise and needless, harsh, oppressive and unequal in its operation, and warmly applaud Horatio Seymour for the stand he has taken. The announcement of his name was received with applause. Miscellaneous. A mass meeting of the conscripts of Brooklyn and Williamsburg was called for at Washington Park on the night of the 4th instant but for what specific purpose nobody as yet seems to know; but it probably has reference to some concerted action, looking to mutual exemption. The call is not signed by any person. The authors of it give notice that no politicians will be permitted t
he North. We give some further extracts from our New York files of the 2d Inst.: New York election — speech of Gov. Seymour. The election in New York, for members of the Legislature and other State officers, was to take place yesterday. willing to second their Governor, and the Republicans hoping to embarrass him by an opposition Senate and House. Gov. Horatio Seymour made a speech on Friday last at Syracuse, before a very large meeting. The most noticeable fact (according to the Governor, but who in the approaching election intend to vote the Democratic ticket. We copy one or two extracts from Gov. Seymour's speech: One year ago we were a people united in purpose — to-day we are distracted and paralyzed. --Why? To-dnd we will see to it that there is a State for every star. [Continued cheering.] The meeting then adjourned, and Gov. Seymour arriving again at the hotel, shook hands and conversed with citizens and friends until the hour for dinner. The E
sued, the opposing factions charging each other with all sorts of vileness and trickery. The quarrel revealed the fact that with the exception of the Tammanyites, the leaders of the Democracy in New York city are thoroughly impregnated with the peace delusion. Finally the report of the committee was adopted and agreed to by the Mozart, and McKeon factions, whereupon the Tammany delegation withdrew. At the meeting next day, Convention delegates to the National Convention were elected, Horatio Seymour, Dean Richmond, Isaac Butts and August Belmont, being for the Stats at large. The Convention made no attempt to erect a platform, nor did the Convention make any formal expression of its opinions in the great questions at issue before the country. The troubles at Fort Jackson, below New Orleans, have terminated in a couple of courts martial, one of which finds Lt. Col. Augustus W. Bennett, 4th infantry corps d'afrique, guilty of "inflicting cruel and unusual punishment, to the
e there. We copy such of the preliminary proceedings as are interesting. Governor Seymour, of New York, withdrew his name on the 28th positively, and the New York dnson, and several others, from Kentucky; Richmond, the Woods, Belmont, McKcon, Seymour, and a host of lesser lights, from New York; Dana, from Maine; J. Glancey Joneimself, it is said, disapproving all such extra zealous advocacy. Governor Horatio Seymour is the next on the list, and will appear as the special champion of thof his "friends" will recognize him as a perfect master of the situation. Governor Seymour is a gentlemen by birth and education, a man of old family, and possessingful. Very certain it is, however, that in the Central and Western States, Governor Seymour's name and antecedents would prove strong; although, in the army, his vote would probably fall short of that which General McClellan could command. Seymour would run as a positive man on the platform of hostility to New England ideas and
without dissent. The vote was then taken by States, the chairman of each delegation announcing the vote of each State as they were called: McClellanSeymour Maine50 New Hampshire70 Vermont30 Massachusetts120 Rhode Island40 Connecticut60 New York336 New Jersey70 Pennsylvania260 Delaware03 Kentucky07 Ohio136 Illinois160 Michigan30 Missouri74 Minnesota40 Wisconsin80 Kansas30 California50 Oregon30 202½23½ Several delegation having given their votes for Horatio Seymour, when the call of States had been finished Mr. Seymour declined the nomination. He knew General McClellan did not seek the nomination. That able officer hadMr. Seymour declined the nomination. He knew General McClellan did not seek the nomination. That able officer had declared it would be more agreeable to him to resume his position in the army; but he will not honor any less the high position assigned him by a great majority of his countrymen because he has not sought it. * * We are now appealing to the American people to unite and save our country. Let us not look back. It is with the
made up their minds whether the rebellion exists at the North or the South--whether it is represented by Jeff. Davis or Seymour — it is to be suppressed--["Bully for you"]--and the greatest triumph we can achieve in this election is in the absolute destruction of Horatio Seymour. I mean the destruction of Seymour and his infernal exhorts, who have raised themselves up against the prosecution of this war since the firing of Fort Seymour. [A voice--"Send him to the State prison."] That is tooSeymour and his infernal exhorts, who have raised themselves up against the prosecution of this war since the firing of Fort Seymour. [A voice--"Send him to the State prison."] That is too good a place for him. [Groans for Seymour.] Mr. Busteed proposed three cheers for Governor Morton, which were given with a hearty good will. "John Brown" was called for, to which some one responded, "Do let John Brown's bones rest for a fSeymour.] Mr. Busteed proposed three cheers for Governor Morton, which were given with a hearty good will. "John Brown" was called for, to which some one responded, "Do let John Brown's bones rest for a few minutes." [Cheers and laughter.] At half-past 10 P. M. the Chairman said: I find I have done injustice to Massachusetts. I announced the majority at sixty thousand. The telegraph informs me that it will exceed seventy- five thousand. [Thr
Latest from the North--Lincoln calls for one Million of Atlanta reported burned and Sherman Marching on Charleston. Petersburg, November 13. -- of the 10th have been received. Lincoln's to conceded. Seymour is elected New York. Lincoln calls The Yankee papers Sherman, and his army &c. The Yankee papers of the probable capture of the November 7th. New Jersey, Kentucky and About 225,000 majority of the were cast for Lincoln and of Twelve Democrats and elected to Congress from New York.
eption and banquet given to him by the citizens of Roxbury, Massachusetts, on Tuesday evening. They also presented to him an elegant silver tea service. How Lincoln put in the bogus votes is pretty well shown in the following: "It is an interesting fact that the recent Presidential vote is largely in excess of the popular vote of 1860, notwithstanding the numbers absent in, and lost by, the war." The majority in New York State for Reuben E. Fenton, who is elected Governor over Horatio Seymour, is nearly two thousand greater than that for Lincoln. Secretary Fessenden is about to commence the issue of three-cent currency notes, for the purpose of facilitating change. The Kearsarge is on exhibition at Boston. Twenty-five cents a head; proceeds go to "Poor Jack." The Western papers say that John C. Fremont is to be Minister to France and Salmon P. Chase Minister to England. The Louisville Journal says slavery is dead in Kentucky. Bradford was the only t
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