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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Third Battery of Maryland Artillery. (search)
painful to the detached section of the Third Maryland, as much the larger part of their battery was lost with the city. As before stated, three officers, seventy men, and five guns of the Third Maryland were surrendered. They were paroled on the 12th of July, and on the 26th, at Enter-prise, were furloughed for thirty days, with orders to report at Decatur, Georgia. The destruction of the Indianola. The Indianola was captured from the Federals on the 24th of February, 1863, near Grand Gulf. An authentic account of the engagement is contained in Major Brent's report to General Richard Taylor, published in the Southern Historical Society Papers; but a better and more graphic one may be found in General Taylor's book, Destruction and Reconstruction. The Indianola was the most formidable vessel of the enemy's fleet on the Mississippi, and her capture was the subject of much rejoicing at the time, both as a glorious achievement and as making a most invaluable addition to the sma
John S. Bowen, with his Missouri Brigade, to Grand Gulf, near the mouth of the Big Black, and establer to their selected point of crossing below Grand Gulf. On the 29th the enemy's gunboats came do in front of our batteries and rifle-pits at Grand Gulf. A furious cannonade was continued for manyhim. Directions were sent to the garrison at Grand Gulf to dismantle the fortifications and evacuatee rest of Grant's army which had gone toward Grand Gulf, Pemberton commenced energetically to preparbe made by the shortest practicable route to Grand Gulf. The indications now are that the attack wid as a movable force for either Warrenton or Grand Gulf. On the 28th Brigadier General Bowen, commrs of his cavalry detachments to move toward Grand Gulf, to harass the enemy in flank and rear, obstable to draw its supplies from Bruinsburg or Grand Gulf, and be driven back before crossing the Big the bloody scenes of Shiloh, Iuka, Corinth, Grand Gulf, Port Gibson, Baker's Creek, and Vicksburg, [3 more...]
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Civil War in the United States. (search)
es approached within 5 miles of the Patent Office at Washington and were repulsed with heavy loss.—13-14. Gen. A. J. Smith defeated the Confederates under Forrest, Lee, and Walker, in five different engagements, in Mississippi, killing and wounding over 2,000.—15. Six steamers burned at St. Louis by incendiaries.—16. Gold in New York rose to 284. General Rousseau burned four store-houses and their contents of provisions at Youngsville, Ala.— 17. General Slocum defeated the Confederates at Grand Gulf, Miss.—18. Rousseau sent out raiders on the Atlantic and Montgomery Railway, who destroyed a large section of it, defeated 1,500 Confederates in a battle, and captured 400 conscripts. The President called for 300,000 volunteers within fifty days, the deficiency to be made up by drafts.—20. General Asboth captured a Confederate camp for conscripts in Florida.—21. Henderson, Ky., attacked by 700 guerillas.—22. General Rousseau reached Sherman's lines near Atlanta, having in fiftee
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Grand Gulf, battle at. (search)
Grand Gulf, battle at. On the morning of April 29, 1863, Admiral Porter, with his gun and mortar boats, attacked the Confederate batteries at Grand Gulf, on the Mississippi, and after a contest of five hours and a half the lower batteries were silenced. The upper ones were too high to be much affected. The Confederates hadGrand Gulf, on the Mississippi, and after a contest of five hours and a half the lower batteries were silenced. The upper ones were too high to be much affected. The Confederates had field-batteries which were moved Attack of the gunboats on Grand Gulf. from point to point, and sharp-shooters filled rifle-pits on the high sides. Grant, becoming convinced that Porter could not take the batteries, ordered him to run by them with gunboats and transports, as he had done at Vicksburg and Warrenton, while the aGrand Gulf. from point to point, and sharp-shooters filled rifle-pits on the high sides. Grant, becoming convinced that Porter could not take the batteries, ordered him to run by them with gunboats and transports, as he had done at Vicksburg and Warrenton, while the army (on the west side of the river) should move down to Rodney, below, where it might cross without much opposition. At six o'clock in the evening, under cover of a heavy fire from the fleet, all the transports passed by in good condition.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Haines's Bluff. (search)
t this point on the Yazoo River there were stirring military events preparatory to the siege of Vicksburg. General Sherman, with the 15th Corps, had been operating in the Yazoo region, and when Grant determined to change his base of supplies to Grand Gulf, below Vicksburg, Sherman was ordered to make a feint against Haines's Bluff, which the Nationals had been unable to pass. On the morning of April 29, 1863, he proceeded from Milliken's Bend, with Blair's division, in ten steamboats, and armoroats, and went up the Yazoo. On the morning of May 6 the armored gunboats assailed the fortifications at Haines's Bluff, and in the evening Blair's troops were landed, as if with the intention of making an attack. The bombardment was kept up until dark, when the troops were quietly re-embarked. The assault and menace were repeated the next (lay, when Sherman received an order from Grant to hasten with his troops down the west side of the Mississippi and join him at Grand Gulf. See Vicksburg.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mississippi River. (search)
while four armed boats were close in chase. the Era was extricated, and, going slowly up the Mississippi, met the powerful National iron-clad Indianola coming down in a fog. She rescued the Era from her pursuers (among which was the powerful ram Webb, which had come out of the Red River), and she reached a point below Vicksburg in safety. the Indianola blockaded the mouth of the Red River a few days, and then ascending the Mississippi to enter the Big Black River, she was assailed near Grand Gulf, at 9 P. M., by powerful Confederate gunboats (among them the Webb and the captured Queen of the West), and was compelled to surrender. The Confederates now believed they had nothing to fear between Vicksburg and Port Hudson, when they were alarmed and disconcerted by a trick. Admiral Porter fitted up a worthless flat-boat in imitation of a ram, with smoke-stacks made of porkbarrels, and set it afloat one night without a man on board. When the Confederates discovered it they believed it
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Port Gibson, battle of. (search)
Port Gibson, battle of. Grant crossed the Mississippi at Bruinsburg on the gunboats and transports which had run by Grand Gulf in 1863. His troops consisted chiefly of General McClernand's 13th Army Corps. These troops pushed forward and were met (May 1), 8 miles from Bruinsburg, by a Confederate force, which was pushed back to a point 4 miles from Port Gibson. There McClernand was confronted by a strong force from Vicksburg, under General Bowen, advantageously posted. The Nationals were divided for the occasion. On McClernand's right were the divisions of Generals Hovey, Carr, and Smith, and on his left that of Osterhaus. The former pressed the Confederates steadily back to Port Gibson. The troops of Osterhaus were reinforced by a brigade of General Logan's division of the advance of McPherson's corps, and others were sent to help McClernand. Late in the afternoon the Confederates were repulsed and pursued to Port Gibson. Night ended the conflict, and under its cover th
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Raymond, battle of (search)
Raymond, battle of Gen. W. T. Sherman was called from operations in the Yazoo region (see Haines's Bluff) by General Grant. He marched down the western side of the Mississippi River, crossed at Hard Times, and on the following day (May 8, 1863) joined Grant on the Big Black River. Grant had intended to send down troops to assist Banks in an attack upon Port Hudson, but circumstances compelled him to move forward from Grand Gulf and Port Gibson. He made for the important railway connecting Jackson, the capital of Mississippi, with Vicksburg. His army moved in parallel lines on the eastern side of the river. These were led respectively by Generals McClernand and McPherson, and each was followed by portions of Sherman's corps. When, on the morning of April 12, the van of each column was approaching the railway near Raymond, the county seat of Hinds county, the advance of McPherson's corps, under Logan, was attacked by about 6,000 Confederates under Generals Gregg and Walker. I
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
on of the President relative to desertions in the army......March 10, 1863 Major-General Burnside supersedes Maj.-Gen. H. G. Wright in the Department of the Ohio......March 25, 1863 Admiral Farragut passes the Confederate batteries at Grand Gulf, Miss., with three gun-boats.......April 1, 1863 Raid of mounted infantry from Tuscumbia, Ala., towards Rome, Ga. The entire force, 1,700 men, with Col. A. D. Streight, captured by the Confederates......April 7–May 3, 1863 Major-General Burn863 General Grant crosses the Mississippi at Bruinsburg, below Vicksburg......April 30, 1863 Battle of Chancellorsville, Va.......May 2-4, 1863 [ Stonewall Jackson (Confederate general) mortally wounded on the 2d, dies on the 10th.] Grand Gulf, below Vicksburg, abandoned by the Confederates......May 3, 1863 Clement L. Vallandigham arrested at Dayton, O., for treasonable utterances, by orders from General Burnside......May 4, 1863 General Hooker recrosses the Rappahannock......M
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mississippi, (search)
by the Confederates under General Van Dorn, Oct. 3-4; Grenada occupied by General Hovey's expedition, 20,000 strong, Dec. 2; Van Dorn defeats the Federal cavalry in battle of Coffeeville, Dec. 5; Holly Springs surrendered to the Confederates, Dec. 20; unsuccessful attack of Federals on Vicksburg......Dec. 27-29, 1862 Important military operations during 1863: Colonel Grierson with Federal troops makes a raid through the State from Tennessee to Louisiana, April 17–May 5; naval battle of Grand Gulf, April 29; McClernand defeats the Confederates at Port Gibson, May 1; Raymond occupied by Federals under General McPherson, May 12; McPherson occupies Jackson, May 14; Grant defeats Pemberton at Champion Hills, May 16, and at Big Black River, May 17; Vicksburg invested by forces under General Grant, May 18; Vicksburg surrendered, July 4; Jackson evacuated by General Johnston, who had occupied it after the advance of the Federals on Vicksburg, and the city is occupied by General Sherman....
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