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from Gen. Wise's command — Operations in the Kanawha Valley — Exploit of the Richmond Blues--the fight near Beverley. The Richmond Enquirer publisact of a letter from Charleston, Kanawha county, the present headquarters of General Wise. Alluding to the General, the writer says: He seizes traitors, and thBulltown and Frenchtown are ordered to be occupied by strong detachments. O. Jennings Wise escaped from Ripley. Col. Norton went after him on the 4th, but Wise retrWise retreated on Charleston. Col. Connell, of the 17th Ohio, is appointed commander of this post. Capt. Barrett's company, 19th Ohio, was paraded before the regimt, are besieged by a picked Regiment of Virginians and 1,500 militia under O. Jennings Wise." It will be seen, by reference to our telegraph column, that a reporelegraph column, that a report afterwards reached Cincinnati that Capt. Wise had captured a battalion or so of Hessians at Glenville. We hope this may prove true
The Exploit of Capt. Wise's command. Cincinnati, July 11. --It is reported here that Capt. O. Jennings Wise captured three companies of Federal troops at Glenville. The Exploit of Capt. Wise's command. Cincinnati, July 11. --It is reported here that Capt. O. Jennings Wise captured three companies of Federal troops at Glenville.
captured this morning reports the Confederate force at 5.500. Capture of three companies of Ohio Volunteers. The Cincinnati Enquirer, of Wednesday, the 10th, has the following in relation to the capture of the Ohio volunteers by Capt. O. Jennings Wise: United States Quartermaster John H. Dickerson last evening received a special dispatch from Buckannon, Va., from a reliable source, to the effect that a courier had arrived from Glenville, and that three companies of Col. Connell's Nineteenth Regiment of Ohio Volunteers were besieged and captured by the Confederate forces, three thousand strong, under O. Jennings Wise, and were detained as prisoners of war. Two regiments had been dispatched to their relief and rescue, and report gives it that a fight was inevitable. Affairs at Martinsburg, Va. We take the following from a letter dated Martinsburg, Va., July 10: The arrest of two reporters caused some sensation in town yesterday. Mr. Rea, of the Associated
s probably authentic. Our correspondence states that steamers were removing troops from that place on Sunday. Regarding the movements of our own army on the Peninsula, we have some information, which we do not deem it prudent to publish. Gen. Wise's Brigade is at White Sulphur Springs, and comfortably quartered in that pleasant locality. Capt., O. Jennings Wise, of the Richmond Blues, arrived here yesterday, and reports the troops in good health. Nothing of interest has transpired dence states that steamers were removing troops from that place on Sunday. Regarding the movements of our own army on the Peninsula, we have some information, which we do not deem it prudent to publish. Gen. Wise's Brigade is at White Sulphur Springs, and comfortably quartered in that pleasant locality. Capt., O. Jennings Wise, of the Richmond Blues, arrived here yesterday, and reports the troops in good health. Nothing of interest has transpired in the neighborhood of Alexandria.
Patriotic letter --The following is a copy of a letter written by Brig. Gen. Wise to Mr. C. Bias, of Sweet Springs, Va., acknowledging the receipt of a flag for the Legion: The Confederate flag sent me by yourself, as Secretary of the Sweet Springs Valley Guard, was received yesterday evening; accept for it my grateful acknowledgements. Waving in front of my Legion it shall guide as against the invaders of our soil, and be planted over them victoriously, or else baptized and re-baptized in blood, consecrated on the altar of Virginia and the Confederacy. Whatever be our face, no stain of dishonor shall touch it, not more for our own sakes to whom it is given, than for your sakes who give.
The Daily Dispatch: September 3, 1861., [Electronic resource], Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch. (search)
of the Richmond Dispatch. Military movements — camp scenes — provisions for sick soldiers, &c. Lewisburg, Va., Aug. 28. For some time past there have been various movements of troops in and around our town. The Legion of Gen. Wise, which spent some days at the White Sulphur Springs, came back in due time wonderfully improved. I believe a stranger would have thought them equipped for the first time, so well so well did they look. Floyd's Brigade looked well and marched ne the less brave and true, when Christians. I do not think it proper to give thus publicly the numbers and movements of our troops in these parts. Nor am I sufficiently posted to give their exploits correctly. Suffice it to say, we believe that Tyler and Cox are trying to get out of the way of Generals Floyd and Wise, and that Rosencranz is alarmed already at the not that is being thrown around him. We also hear of severs skirmishing in the Kanawha, in which our troops are successful
Wanted — Recruits. "R. L. I. B." Recruits Wanted for the Richmond Light Infantry Blues each Recruit Enters Active service as soon as Enlisted. Any number of good Recruits will be received into this corps, permission having been obtained to increase the same to a complete battalion. The Blues are attached to the Legion now in service in Western Virginia, under the command of Brig. General Henry A. Wise. The Blues are enlisted for the entire continuance for the war, and no recruit will be accepted for a less period of enlistment. Apply to Capt. Hammon Dugan, Metropolitan hall, Richmond, between the hours of 9 A. M., and 6 P. M. None need apply but men of good character and robust hatch. Honorary members of the Blues and other friends throughout the country, are requested to assist us. Uniforms and other necessary clothing furnished. O. Jennings Wise, Captain E. L. I. B. au 30--6&swtf
Escape of prisoners. --The Salem Register notices the escape of six prisoners from the jail of that town. They were sent thither by General Wise, who arrested them in Kanawha. They overpowered the jailor when he entered to give them water. Ten escaped, but four were arrested. The Register thus describes the six: Tobias Mariana, Kanawha county, Va., about 5 feet 11 inches, rather pale and slender, an Italian, aged 25 years. Phillip Frankenburger, Charleston, Kanawha C. H., about 19 years old, fair complexion, about 5 feet 2 inches, a Jew, from Germany, talks broken. William Springer, about 25 years old, hair rather dark; claimed his home in Mason county, Va., but had been working this year at Fallen Rock, Kanawha, Va., quick spoken, gentlemanly-looking man, about 5 feet 10 inches. James Bodkin, Kanawha, Va., about 5 feet 5 inches, of rather a swarthy complexion, dark hair, about 30 years old. Thomas Newcombe, Putnam county, Va., about 25 years old, about 5 feet 10 inche
ence. In that short time we have increased our territory one-fourth, and subjected the enemy to many disgraceful and disastrous defeats. But our brave, skillful, and able Generals, panting themselves for the battle, have restrained the ardor of their troops, pursued the Fabian, the Washingtonian, and Wellingtonian policy, and fought only when they were prepared and could fight on equal terms. Such has been the policy and practice of Beauregard, of Jolinston, of Magruder, of Lee, McCulloch, Wise, and Floyd; and our President, a distinguished scientific and practical soldier, and wise civilian, has concurred in, approved of, and directed this safe, prudent, humane, Fabian strategy. His Secretary of War, and the rest of his Cabinet, have agreed with him and were a unit on this subject. Everybody who knows anything about military affairs — everybody who is acquainted with the numbers, position, and all the surrounding circumstances of the opposing armies — speaks in terms of admiratio
t two hours, the General and his Aids walked off slowly from the centre of the breastworks towards Col. Wharton's command on the left wing, to see how things were progressing there, a distance of 400 yards, and all the time, while going and returning, the General was exposed to the guns of the enemy, and the balls fell thick and fast around him, as well as those who were with him. No deed of daring, comparable with this, has been performed by any one Turing the whole of the present war. If Gen. Wise had furnished the reinforcements that were asked of him, Gen. Floyd could easily have held his position, and finally would have routed the enemy, and this day we would be in possession of Charlestown. But not only is Gen. Floyd distinguished for his bravery and military sagacity, he is also eminent for his strict temperance habits and correct morals. He neither drinks liquor, nor gambles, nor uses profane language. He has the greatest respect for religion and those who profess it. H
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