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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, United States--Regular Army. (search)
Cherokee Station October 21. Cane Creek October 26. Bear Creek, Tuscumbia, October 27. Chxpedition from Little Rock to Irving Station October 26-28. Expedition from Little Rock to Saliner 24-October 3. Reopening Tennessee River October 26-29. Battles of Chattanooga, Tenn., Novemb24-November 23. Reopening Tennessee River October 26-29. Chattanooga-Ringgold Campaign Novembe24-November 23. Reopening Tennessee River October 26-29. Battles of Chattanooga November 23-27 Cavalrye September 26-27. Milford October 25-26. Expedition to Gordonsville December 19-28. 24-November 23. Reopening Tennessee River October 26-29. Battles of Chattanooga November 23-2524-November 23. Reopening Tennessee River October 26-29. Battles of Chattanooga November 23-2524-November 23. Reopening Tennessee River October 26-29. Battles of Chattanooga November 23-2724-November 23. Reopening Tennessee River October 26-29. Battles of Chattanooga November 23-27
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, United States Colored Troops. (search)
d, Ala., July 23. Expedition from Fort Barrancas August 15-19. Expedition to Marianna September 18-October 4. Euchee Anna Court House September 23. Marianna September 27. Expedition up Blackwater Bay October 25-28. Near Milton October 26. Expedition to Pollard, Ala., December 13-19. Mitchell's Creek December 15-16. Pine Barren Ford December 17-18. March from Pensacola to Blakely, Ala., March 20-April 1, 1865. Siege of Fort Blakely April 1-9. Assault and capturrd Division, 10th Corps, Dept. of North Carolina, to August, 1865. Dept. of North Carolina and Dept. of the South to November, 1866. Service. Duty in Kentucky till October, 1864. Ordered to Baltimore, Md., thence to City Point, Va., October 26. Siege of Petersburg November 3 to December 7. 1st Expedition to Fort Fisher, N. C., December 7-27. 2nd Expedition to Fort Fisher, N. C., January 7-15, 1865. Bombardment of Fort Fisher January 13-15. Assault and capture of Fort F
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865, Chapter 7: bombardment of Charleston. (search)
omlinson and Charles G. Chipman, appointed to the regiment, had joined. A number of the wounded had returned from hospital, and the first lot of furloughed men came back, and with them Capt. J. W. M. Appleton. By these accessions the Fifty-fourth had more officers and men present toward the last of October than at any time after it left St. Helena Island. Our new and old works being in readiness at Cumming's Point, what General Gillmore calls the second bombardment of Sumter was begun October 26. Its purpose was to prevent guns being mounted there, and to cut down the southeast face, that the casemates of the channel face be taken in reverse. General Seymour had returned and assumed command of the island on the 18th. Under his direction our batteries opened from seven heavy rifles (including a three-hundred-pounder) in Wagner, and four in Gregg and from two mortars. Some fire was directed against Fort Johnson also, the enemy replying briskly. The next day the cannonade was re
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865, Roster of the Fifty-Fourth Massachusetts Infantry. (search)
r, Thomas, 1st 19, sin.; butcher; Chatham, Can. 9 Apl 63, 20 Aug 65. $50. Company H. Alexander, George 18, sin.; farmer; Syracuse, N Y. 21 Apl 63; 29 Je 65 New York; dis. Wounded Jly 63 —— and 30 Nov 64 Honey Hill, S. C. $50. Anderson, Washington 25 sin.; farmer; Chicago. 21 Apl 63, deserted 6 Feby 64 Hilton Head. S. C. $50. Barquet, Joseph H. Sergt. 40, mar.; mason; Galesburg, Ill. 26 Apl 63; 20 Aug 65. $50. Reported dead Bateman, Charles I. 18, sin.; farmer; Northampton. 26 Oct. 63; 20 Aug 65. $325. Broady, George 28, mar.; laborer; Battle Creek, Mich. 13 May 63.; 20 Aug 65. Wounded 18 Jly 63 Ft. Wagner and 30 Nov 64 Honey Hill. $50. Day, Mich. Brooks, James J. 23, sin.; farmer; Bellows Falls, Vt. 22July63; 20 Aug. 65. —— Brooks, William H. 28, mar.; laborer; Rutland, Vt. 5 Augt 63; 16 Je 65 Charleston, S. C. Wounded 20 Feb 64 Olustee, Fla. —— Westminster, Vt. Brown, David 35, mar.; laborer; Reading, Pa. 15 Apl. 63; 20 Aug 65. Wounded 20 Feb 64 Ol
s of their departure from the State, and the names of the commanding officers. We now proceed with the nine months regiments. The Third Regiment served in the three months term in the beginning of the war. It was recruited to the full standard for the nine months service at Camp Joe Hooker, at Lakeville. On the twenty-second day of October, the regiment embarked at Boston, in steamers Merrimack and Mississippi, under command of Colonel Silas P. Richmond, and arrived at Beaufort, N. C., Oct. 26, and reached Newbern the same evening. The Fourth Regiment, which had also served in the three months campaign in 1861, was recruited to the full standard at Camp Joe Hooker for the nine months service. On the seventeenth day of December, it was ordered to join General Banks's command at New Orleans. It left the State on that day for New York, under the command of Colonel Henry Walker. From New York it went by transport to New Orleans. The Fifth Regiment, which had also served in t
lled, wounded and missing. During the night General Hatch withdrew. On the sixth of December General Foster obtained a position covering the Charleston and Savannah railroad, between the Coosawatchie and Talifinny rivers. Hood, instead of following Sherman, continued his move northward, which seemed to me to be leading to his certain doom. At all events, had I had the power to command both armies, I should not have changed the orders under which he seemed to be acting. On the twenty-sixth of October the advance of Hood's army attacked the garrison at Decatur, Alabama, but failing to carry the place, withdrew toward Courtland, and succeeded, in the face of our cavalry, in effecting a lodgement on the north side of the Tennessee river, near Florence. On the twenty-eighth Forrest reached the Tennessee at Fort Heiman, and captured a gunboat and three transports. On the second of November he planted batteries above and below Johnsonville, on the opposite side of the river, isolati
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Book 1: he keepeth the sheep. (search)
ese dates: Owen Brown, now of Torrington, late of Simsbury, was married at Simsbury, on the 11th day of February, A. D. 1793. Anna Ruth Brown, daughter of Owen and Ruth Brown, was born in the town of Norfolk, the 5th day of July, 1798. John Brown, son of Owen and Ruth Brown, was born in Torrington, the 9th day of May, 1800. Salmon Brown, son of Owen and Ruth Brown, was born on the 30th day of April, 1802. Oliver Owen Brown, son of Owen and Ruth Brown, was born the 26th day of October, A. D. 1804. John Brown, therefore, was born in the year 1800, at Torrington, Connecticut, where he lived, about a mile north-west of the meeting house, until the age of five, when his father emigrated to Hudson, Ohio; where, we are told, he became one of the principal pioneer settlers of that then new town, ever respected for his probity and decision of character; was commonly called Squire Brown, and was one of the Board of Trustees of Oberlin College; was endowed with energy an
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 1: the child and his ancestors. (search)
ese dates: Owen Brown, now of Torrington, late of Simsbury, was married at Simsbury, on the 11th day of February, A. D. 1793. Anna Ruth Brown, daughter of Owen and Ruth Brown, was born in the town of Norfolk, the 5th day of July, 1798. John Brown, son of Owen and Ruth Brown, was born in Torrington, the 9th day of May, 1800. Salmon Brown, son of Owen and Ruth Brown, was born on the 30th day of April, 1802. Oliver Owen Brown, son of Owen and Ruth Brown, was born the 26th day of October, A. D. 1804. John Brown, therefore, was born in the year 1800, at Torrington, Connecticut, where he lived, about a mile north-west of the meeting house, until the age of five, when his father emigrated to Hudson, Ohio; where, we are told, he became one of the principal pioneer settlers of that then new town, ever respected for his probity and decision of character; was commonly called Squire Brown, and was one of the Board of Trustees of Oberlin College; was endowed with energy an
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 2: Judicial alacrity. (search)
E. P. Dangerfield, Alexander Kelly, Emanuel Spangler, Armstead M. Ball, Joseph A. Brua, William Johnson, Lewis P. Starry, Archibald H. Kitzmiller, were sworn in open Court this 26th day of October, 1859, to give evidence to the Grand Jury upon this bill of indictment. Teste: Robert T. brown, Clerk. A true copy of said indictment. Teste: Robert T. Brown, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Jefferson County, in the State of Virginia. Which bill of indictment the Grand Jury returned this 26th day of October. A true bill. Thomas Rutherford, Foreman. October 26, 1859. Before the indictment was read, as Mr. Faulkner had gone home, the Court requested a Mr. Green, a Virginian, to act as assistant counsel for the defendants. It was understood that all the prisoners were willing that this arrangement should be made. Appeal for a decent delay. John Brown then rose and said: I do not intend to detain the court, but barely wish to say, as I have been promised a fair trial, that
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 9: forty days in chains. (search)
ver wavered in his faith; never faltered in the presence of any man. From his first commitment, on the 19th of October, till the 7th of November, no clean clothing was given to him; he lay as he had fallen at Harper's Ferry, in his dirty and blood-stained garments. Such brief notes as have been published of his life in prison, from reliable authorities, I will now record in their chronological order. During the trial. The first is a telegraphic despatch to the Associated Press, of October 26: Brown has made no confession; but, on the contrary, says he has full confidence in the goodness of God, and is confident that he will rescue him from the perils that surround him, He says he has had rifles levelled at him, knives at his throat, and his life in as great peril as it is now, but that God has always been at his side, He knows God is with him, and fears nothing. On the 2d of November, Judge Russell, of Boston, and his wife, When that Boston wife went down to John Br
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