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The Daily Dispatch: December 28, 1865., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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t it announces anything more than a simple truth, apparent but that it should be officially confessed by a high officer of Government in a communication to Congress, argues a condition of things skin to desperation. Like Richard, the Yankee tyranny has reached the point where all is staked upon the hazard of the die about to be thrown. The opinion of the Secretary was echoed in the Senate. Mr. Sherman said: "The true remedy for our evils, as all know, is the success of our armies." Mr. Chandler thought victories of the Yankee armies would make the "speculators suffer," and Mr. Johnson (Reverdy) thought, "with a vigorous and successful war," the people would allow the debt to be trebled. Of course they would. But as everything, it is conceded, depends on military success, what becomes of Yankeedom if that fails them? Last week there was a vibration of 18 cents in the value of gold — from 171 to 189. It reached the latter, fell back to the former' and rose again to 173. Mr
marry time. We have already published the debate. Mr. P. charged that New England monopolized everything. Out of twelve senators New England had fourteen chairman of committees, and with this example It was easy to see how the country was taxed for her benefit ! He said it was as just to tax the pigs of Arkansas, or the power mills of Illinois, as that the West should be taxed to pay these fishing bounties. The debate became personal, and Mr. Powell was called a friend to traitors by Mr. Chandler, of Michigan, (a native of New England)--Mr. P. charged him with falsehood, and each declared he had no respect for the other.--It was at this juncture that Saulsbury, of Del., with admirable irony, (for such, no doubt, it was,) "appealed to the Senators, that as sons of common sires (very common!) and as brothers, they should, in the present unhappy state of affairs in which the country found itself, act as became the dignity of American Senators !" Capital ! After the pleasant deba
The Daily Dispatch: May 24, 1864., [Electronic resource], Army of Northern Virginia, near Hanover Junction, May 22, 1864 (search)
Police Arrests. --Officer Bibb yesterday morning arrested John Tobin, who was sitting drunk in a store door, and John Allport, who was lying drunk in the street.--The inebriates were locked up in the station-house until sober, and then discharged. Sam, a slave, was arrested yesterday evening for using insolent language to Richard Turner. He was taken before Alderman Chandler, who ordered him thirty lashes.
Affray between and "Bloodletting" Chandler. The New York Tribune gives the particulars of an affray at a hotel in Washington, between and Senator Chandler in which the latter was roughly handled. The grew out of remarks at table by Chandler against the Copperheads. Affray between and "Bloodletting" Chandler. The New York Tribune gives the particulars of an affray at a hotel in Washington, between and Senator Chandler in which the latter was roughly handled. The grew out of remarks at table by Chandler against the Copperheads. Affray between and "Bloodletting" Chandler. The New York Tribune gives the particulars of an affray at a hotel in Washington, between and Senator Chandler in which the latter was roughly handled. The grew out of remarks at table by Chandler against the Copperheads.
y well. He was here a day or two before the others, and did not seem inclined to take advantage of our defenceless condition; but as soon as Crook, Hunter, and Duffee came the work of destruction commenced. * * * When the bridge was burnt the wind was very high and set directly up the street, so that the small houses near the bridge caught immediately; then the large lumber house of George Thompson, the Hob house, Mrs. Johnston's, and the houses where Mr. Johnston's, and the houses where Mr. Chandler and Dr. Scott lived. Others caught, but were put out. We are much indebted to Averill's men for the promptitude with which they assisted in extinguishing the fire and helping those who had to move." From this letter, it appears that Averill's troops are somewhat less brutal in their instincts than the generality of Yankee soldiers, and, on the principle of giving the devil his due, we are willing to accord them credit for it. Rumors from the Valley. A report is current tha
Police arrest. --Officer Granger arrested yesterday afternoon a negro fellow named James, slave of Childrey & Jones, charged with stealing a pair of shoes from Elizabeth Woody. The matter was disposed of by Justice Chandler, who ordered him to be whipped.
e sent to these headquarters for trial and punishment by martial law. The following is a sly suggestion to the Vermonters that burning a town or two in Canada might not be a bad way to get even: It is earnestly hoped that the inhabitants of our frontier districts will abstain from all acts of retaliation on account of the outrages committed by rebel marauders, and that the proper measures of redress will be left to the action of the public authorities. In the Yankee Senate, Mr. Chandler, of Michigan, offered a resolution inquiring into the expediency of raising an army corps to protect the Canadian frontier, and then the following preamble and resolutions, all of which lie over: Whereas, at the commencement of the present rebellion, the United States were at peace with all the governments of the world, and upon terms of comity and good will with Great Britain; and whereas, that nation, before the arrival on her soil of our minister accredited to the Administration o
Police arrests. --The civil police made the following arrests yesterday: Mason, a slave of Madison Macon, charged with stealing a trunk and clothing from the room of Captain T. M. Semmes. John McDonald, charged with misconduct and resisting the police in discharge of their duty. Wat, slave of John Taylor, charged with stealing a goose. In this case Justice Chandler ordered the accused thirty-nine lashes and set him free. The other parties were held for examination before the Mayor this morning.
Police arrests. --The civil police made the following arrests yesterday: Mason, a slave of Madison Macon, charged with stealing a trunk and clothing from the room of Captain T. M. Semmes. John McDonald, charged with misconduct and resisting the police in discharge of their duty. Wat, slave of John Taylor, charged with stealing a goose. In this case Justice Chandler ordered the accused thirty-nine lashes and set him free. The other parties were held for examination before the Mayor this morning.
itorial complimentary to Messrs. Wharncliffe and Adams, and, by inference, the reverse to Mr. Seward. The Daily News justifies Mr. Seward's course, and shows that Wharncliffe deserved rebuke. La France points to General Fremont as the late Mr. Dayton's successor. The Russian ambassador had returned to Rome. The Times contrasts the temperate language of Lincoln, in his late message, and the proclamation of General Dix and the resolutions offered in the Federal Senate by Mr. Chandler. It says: "In Congress we are charged with complicity in assassination and pillage, while a military commander threatens our territories with invasion; but the chief of the Republic does justice to both Canada and England, and we gladly receive his views as those which time and reason will commend to the American people. War between America and England would be simply the most formidable intervention in behalf of the South which Mr. Davis could desire." The Times especially recommends t
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