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aving colonies there, to negotiate with them, subject to the advice and consent of the Senate to favor the voluntary emigration of persons of that class to their respective Territories upon conditions which shall be equal, just, and humane. Liberia and Hayti are, as yet, the only countries to which colonists of African descent from here could go with certainty of being received and adopted as citizens; and I regret to say such persons, contemplating colonization, do not seem willing to migcountries from the United States. The new commercial treaty between the United States and the Sultan of Turkey has been carried into execution. A commercial and consular treaty has been negotiated, subject to the Senate's consent, with Liberia; and a similar negotiation is now pending with the republic of Hayti. A considerable improvement of the national commerce is expected to result from these measures. Our relations with Great Britain, France, Spain, Portugal, Russia, Prussia
Hayti and Liberia. Lincoln says, in his Message: "Liberia and Hayti are as yet the only countries to which colonists of African descent from here could go with certainty of being received and adopted as citizens; and, I regret to say, such persons contemplating colonization do not seem willing to migrate to those countrLiberia and Hayti are as yet the only countries to which colonists of African descent from here could go with certainty of being received and adopted as citizens; and, I regret to say, such persons contemplating colonization do not seem willing to migrate to those countries as to some others, nor so willing as I think their interests demand." It appears from the above that among such 'gemmed of color' as "contemplate colonization"--a very small proportion of the whole — Liberia and Hayti are not popular. Will some of the negro worshippers explain the reason? Why should the African race, oLiberia and Hayti are not popular. Will some of the negro worshippers explain the reason? Why should the African race, of all others, disdain to emigrate at all, or, if it consent to emigrate, refuse to go where its own color predominates? Why would they rather be kicked and cuffed about even by white Yankees than live on terms of perfect equality with their own brethren? Give us the philosophy of that, oh, Abraham!
of practical men to slavery existing bounds, instead of suffering it to be spread over the whole unoccupied portion of this vast continent? Is it not favoring emancipation in the Federal district, to be accomplished at the Government's and without individual injustice or oppression! Does it not receive all who come into the Federal camps, to offer their services to the Union, and hold and protect them against disloyal claimants. Does it not favor the recognition of Hayti and Liberia! The that Mr. was required to give up his place because of his decided opposition to slavery is without foundation; that distinguished gentleman resigned his place only because his could be useful in a diplomatic situation, while the gentleman appointed his successor, it was expected, would be more efficient in administration. His successor has no more sympathy with slavery than Mr. Cameron. These and thoughts are a mun to you confidentially for such use in detail may be
outhern candidate for the Presidency was defeated at the election which immediately preceded the present rebellion; it has also abolished slavery from the District of Columbia; it has virtually repealed the fugitive slave act, by prohibiting the rendition of slaves escaping from the rebel States to the lines of the United States army, providing compensation on account of such as may belong to loyal citizens; it has recognized and entered into diplomatic relations with the negro republics of Liberia and Hayti; by the confiscation bill — considerately made non-retrospective — it, in effect, proclaimed emancipation to the slaves in the rebel States within a specified period; a majority in Congress has ratified the President's plan of compensated emancipation for such slave States as may elect to take advantage of it, and only recently the President has announced that the details of the measure will be submitted to the next Congress, with a view to its immediate practical application.
The Daily Dispatch: December 25, 1862., [Electronic resource], Another Richmond letter in the London times. (search)
The Yankee Congress and the war — Nigger regiments--Confederate bonds at the North. Mobile, December 23. --A special dispatch to the Advertiser and Register, dated Murfreesboro', 22d, says late Northern papers state that a bill has been introduced into the Yankee Congress authorizing the organization of one hundred regiments of "contraband," to serve for seven years! It also establishes a line of steamers between New York and Liberia, and appropriates the proceeds of confiscated rebel property for these purposes. The New York Times says parties in the North are eagerly purchasing Confederate bonds at 50 cents on a dollar, and that private paper of wealthy Southerners sells readily at par.
Dead. --Miss Mary Carolina Stevens died in Yelbot county, Md., a few days ago. The packet ship Mary Caroline Stevens, running between this port and Liberia, was called after the deceased, her father, the late Col. John Stevens, having made the ship a present to the Maryland Colonization Society.
Death of Gilbert Huns. --Gilbert Hunt, the well known colored blacksmith, died yesterday at the rips age of 88 years. During 60 years of his long and eventful life, G. Bart, though an humble was a useful and respected resident of Richmond. He had home a creditable part in several issues where only men of iron nerve could stand and act. He was instrumental in saving the lives of a great many during the conflagration of the Richmond Theatre in 1861 in our junction with the late Dr. McCaw; and his services were hardly less complete our at the burning of the Va. Penitentiary in 1832. Shortly after the burning of the Richmond Theatre, Gilbert was set free by his master, and in need by urgent solicitation to migrate to Liberia, but neither the or the people suited him, and he returned to Richmond, thoroughly seek of Africa.
ccumulations of freedmen during the war. Every effort has been made by the assistant commissioner to reduce these collections, and the great majority have had an entire or partial support, as the fruit of their own labor during the summer. Soldiers' wives and families were left behind when the troops were transported from City Point to Texas. As many of these as were willing to go were sent to Texas at the public expense. A colony of upwards of a hundred, signifying its wish to go to Liberia, through a colored agent, was transported from Lynchburg to Baltimore, where the Colonization Society took the complete charge. The last report gives to freedmen's schools, 195 teachers, 11,500 scholars. The Congressmen are about carrying out the last card in the original programme of the disunion cabal. It is to go home and agitate the State Legislatures, that are about to sit, to antagonize the President by instructions to Senators and Representatives in Congress. Mr. Newt
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