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ns. Col. Joseph Drake sent two companies of Mississippians to meet the first advance of the enemy on February 4th, who held the rifle-pits alone until reinforced. During the bombardment of the 6th, which resulted in the surrender of Fort Henry, Colonel Drake commanded a brigade at the rifle-pits, and he subsequently marched his men in good order to Donelson and commanded a brigade during the defense of that post. In the Confederate lines before Donelson, under fire during February 13th and 14th, and in the assault which was made on the 15th for the purpose of opening a line of retreat, the Mississippians were among the most conspicuous for gallantry and steadiness under fire. The left wing included the First, Lieutenant-Colonel Hamilton, and Twenty-third, Lieutenant-Colonel Wells, in Davidson's brigade; the Fourth, Major Adair, in Colonel Drake's brigade; the Twentieth, Maj. W. N. Brown, in McCausland's brigade; the Twenty-sixth, Colonel Reynolds, in Baldwin's brigade. Baldwin's
and marched toward Pontotoc and Houston, not encountering any of the Confederate forces until General Gholson with a small body of State troops confronted him near Houston. As the enemy approached Houston closer a determined resistance was made in the Houlka swamp, and Smith turned off and marched toward Okolona, whence he sent a brigade to Aberdeen to threaten Columbus, and two brigades down the railroad toward West Point. Meanwhile Forrest, learning of Smith's movement at Oxford, February 14th, moved all his forces rapidly to Starkville, reaching there on the 18th, Lee being notified on the 17th to join him. On the 19th Forrest sent Bell's brigade to Columbus, Forrest's to Aberdeen and Chalmers, with McCulloch's and Richardson's brigades, to West Point to observe the enemy. At the same time Smith concentrated his command at Prairie Station, and advanced on West Point on the 20th. Colonel Forrest met his advance before West Point, and fell back skirmishing until he was joined
to go to Fort Donelson. The order was immediately obeyed, and going on board a transport they arrived next morning under a heavy fire. The companies were formed on the transport and marched off in regular order. In passing through the village of Dover, three men were wounded, one mortally, by the Federal shells. Then, assigned to Colonel Heiman's brigade, the regiment was thrown into the trenches. This was the introduction of these gallant men to the stern realities of war. On the 13th, 14th and 15th of February occurred the severest fighting at Donelson. Both superiors and subordinates bore testimony to the gallantry of Colonel Quarles in the trying ordeal of this first battle. In this attack, says Gen. Bushrod Johnson, speaking of the first assaults of the enemy, Captain Maney's company of artillery and Colonels Abernathy's and Quarles' regiments principally suffered and deserve more particular notice. During the three days fighting the conduct of Colonel Quarles was such th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Address before the Virginia division of Army of Northern Virginia, at their reunion on the evening of October 21, 1886. (search)
in fitting up the expedition, and for whom he felt and ever testified the most profound veneration. Nor was anything more distasteful to his truly noble and generous nature than the attempts of flatterers who would pay their court to himself by overrating his services at St. Vincent, and ascribing to him the glory of that memorable day. On the other hand, Lord St. Vincent knew all the while how attempts had been made by Lord Nelson's flatterers to set him up as the true hero of the fourteenth of February, but never for an instant did the feelings towards Nelson cross his mind by which inferior natures would have been swayed. In spite of all these invidious arts he magnanimously sent Nelson to Aboukir, and by unparalleled exertion, which he, Vincent, alone could make, armed him with the means of eclipsing his own fame. The mind of the historian, says Lord Brougham, weary with recounting the deeds of human baseness, and mortified with contemplating the frailty of illustrious men, gat
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.35 (search)
nt by the publishers to the Congressional library. It is anticipated that every State in the Union will, in behalf of the men each sent to the armies, contribute liberally. The interest so just, grows more widely pervading, and is happily crystallizing into definite measures for durable and effective organization. A joint meeting of the Union and Confederate veterans, who were engaged at Chickamauga, was held in the room of the Senate Committee on Military Affairs in Washington on February 14th. The object was to devise a plan for preserving that field and marking the positions of all the forces that participated in the fight. General Henry M. Cist, of Cincinnati, chairman of the committee of the Society of the Army of the Cumberland charged with this subject, called his committee here last night. It organized and invited co-operation from the ex Confederates present. The meeting here noticed was the result. There were present Generals Rosecrans, Baird, Reynolds, Cist, Ma
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.24 (search)
Department of East Tennessee. Hamilton, pat. H., Assistant Surgeon, appointed by Secretary of War to rank from June 30, ‘62. Dec. 31, ‘62, Cleveland, Jan. to, ‘63, ordered to report to Surgeon Stout by Surgeon Foard, put on duty at Rome, Ga., Feb. 14, ‘63. July 8, ‘63, relieved at Rome, ordered to report to General Forrest, Aug. 31, ‘63, 11th Tennessee Cavalry. Jan. 8, ‘64, released with 11th Tennessee Cavalry and ordered to report to General Hindman, commanding corps, July 31, ‘64. 43d Geor com'd to rank Sept. 29, ‘63, assigned by Med. Ex. Board, Dec. 31, ‘62, Gano Cavalry Regiment. Jan. 13, ‘64, resigned. Mauzy, Chas. K., Assistant Surgeon, appointed by Secretary of War Nov. 14, ‘61, to rank as A. S. 16th Tennessee Regiment, Feb. 14, ‘63, Jones' com'd. Passed Board at Charleston, Feb. ‘62. Nov. 30, ‘63, 16th Tennessee Regiment. McCrary, Lyman B., born 1810 in Lawrence county, Alabama, Assistant Surgeon. Passed Board at Murfreesboro Dec. 5, ‘62.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), War Diary of Capt. Robert Emory Park, Twelfth Alabama Regiment. January 28th, 1863January 27th, 1864. (search)
O'Neal, was transferred to Mobile. Promoted Brigadier-General and placed in command of Rodes' Brigade. As there were only nine companies in the 61st, the Secretary of War declined to issue a commission as Colonel to Col. Swanson, and he returned to Alabama. I received a neat little note inviting me to call at Col. Thos. Bell Bigger's on Broad street, between 9th and 10th streets, and signed Mollie T—y. Her note was four days reaching me, and when I called she had left for Petersburg. Feb. 14. St. Valentine's Day. I walked to the city, and had a glorious bath at the Ballard House, and met many friends. Feb. 15. A light snow covered mother earth's bosom to-day, and kept us from the city. Our trips to the city are greatly enjoyed, and all are allowed to go when they please, and stay as long as they please. Jim Lester exchanged a jug of water for one of whiskey as adroitly as Simon Suggs could have done. Feb. 16. Torn off. Feb. 17. An intensely cold day. All suffered
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.22 (search)
oint the officers therein provided to be appointed in and for said Territory: Now, therefore, I, Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States of America, do issue this, my proclamation, declaring said Act to organize the Territory of Arizona to be in full force and operation, and that I have proceeded to appoint the officers therein provided to be appointed in and for said Territory. Given under my hand and the seal of the Confederate States of America, at Richmond, this 14th day of February, A. D. 1862. By the President: (Seal.) Jefferson Davis. R. M. T. Hunter, Secretary of War. So much now for the facts of the Territory of Arizona, as to being created and organized by and under the government of the Confederate States of America. In the next year, 1863, on the 24th day of February, it appears that the Congress of the United States, in session in Washington city, followed the Congress of the Confederate States and passed an act to establish and organize th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
tention to the matter, as he has acquaintance with such things. J. E. Thomas, keeper of the public arms at New Berne, made an inventory July 5th, aided by Colonel John D. Whitford, and found 1,648 muskets in order, 42 of which had never been packed; also 157 horse pistols and 120 sabres; also large quantities of infantry and cavalry equipments, also, a cannon. He said that under the Governor's directions he had placed the arms under the protection of the New Berne Light Infantry. February 14th, the Governor wrote Lieutenant Lee that he did not like to make a contract with Smith & Hitchcock for the reasons named in Lee's endorsement on their proposals. He asked Lee to make out an order for fuses and friction primers for cannon, and said if he could not do better, he would order from Hitchcock. The next day the Governor wrote Dr. E. C. Evans, at New York: The military commission has not yet been called together, and I have not yet fixed a day for their meeting. Our railroad
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.12 (search)
tention to the matter, as he has acquaintance with such things. J. E. Thomas, keeper of the public arms at New Berne, made an inventory July 5th, aided by Colonel John D. Whitford, and found 1,648 muskets in order, 42 of which had never been packed; also 157 horse pistols and 120 sabres; also large quantities of infantry and cavalry equipments, also, a cannon. He said that under the Governor's directions he had placed the arms under the protection of the New Berne Light Infantry. February 14th, the Governor wrote Lieutenant Lee that he did not like to make a contract with Smith & Hitchcock for the reasons named in Lee's endorsement on their proposals. He asked Lee to make out an order for fuses and friction primers for cannon, and said if he could not do better, he would order from Hitchcock. The next day the Governor wrote Dr. E. C. Evans, at New York: The military commission has not yet been called together, and I have not yet fixed a day for their meeting. Our railroad
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