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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Diary of Rev. J. G. Law. (search)
ff of Colonel Preston Smith. Witnessed the amputation of a poor fellow's leg this evening. Dr. Bell was the operator. Have resolved to be more attentive to my religious duties, and begun to-night to read through the New Testament. November 11th.—A cold raw day. The enemy were reported landing in force a few miles above here, and we prepared for warm work. A fearful accident happened this morning. Our big gun burst, and killed ten men. General Polk barely escaped with his life. November 13th.—Our prisoners returned from Cairo this evening, and say that the enemy will attack Columbus very soon. General Pillow's division commenced to move to-day, but for some reason, the order was countermanded. It is supposed that the threatened attack caused the retrograde movement. November 16th.—After a cold rain last night, Sir Jack made his appearance this morning. Rode horseback before breakfast. A boat arrived from Cairo, under flag of truce. It is said that an unconditional su<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Diary of Major R. C. M. Page, Chief of Confederate States artillery, Department of Southwest Virginia and East Tennessee, from October, 1864, to May, 1865. (search)
enden informed me that General Breckinridge had been repulsed with considerable loss, and the whole command had orders to fall back at once to the entrance of the valley to await an expected attack. Accordingly, we fell back at once. As we occupied a strong position, however, the enemy did not attack, but was evidently preparing to retreat, and it was determined to follow them up. As soon as it was dark, General Breckinridge moved the whole force rapidly by Taylor's Gap on our left. November 13th, 1864.—At about 4 A. M. struck Gilliam in left flank as he was retreating and completely routed his force, capturing all his guns (six Parrotts), wagons, ambulances, and a considerable quantity of small arms that had been thrown away. A section of Jeter's battery, from Asheville, North Carolina, now reported to me. It had come up with other troops from that quarter. Camped near Russellville, Hamblin county, Tennessee, towards morning. November 14th, 1864.—Marched to camp, near Morr
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.24 (search)
and 9th Tennessee Regiments. Fletcher, Jno. S., Surgeon. Passed Board, Tupelo, July 15, ‘62, com'd Assistant Surgeon Nov. 13, ‘61. Dec. 31, ‘62, 25th Alabama Regiment, as Surgeon (Murfreesboro). Jan 15, ‘64, ordered to report to Major-General Ch64, 13th and 20th Lousiana. Houston, A. P., Assistant Surgeon. Ordered by Secretary of War to report to A. J. Foard, Nov. 13, ‘62. Dec. 31, ‘62, Dalton, Ga. Appointed by Secretary of War June 13, ‘63, to rank from Nov. 13, ‘62, report to GeneralNov. 13, ‘62, report to General Bragg. Oct. 31, ‘63, 24th Alabama, April 30, ‘64, 24th Alabama. Hotchkiss, T. C., Surgeon. Dec. 31, ‘62, 1st Louisiana Cavalry. Holland, J. W., Assistant Surgeon. Ordered to report to Colonel 1st Kentucky Regiment Cavalry. Jan. 1, ‘64, repo Gen. Roddy Sept. 7, ‘63. Sept. 30, ‘63, Roddy's Brigade Hospital, Oct. 31, ‘63, Terrell's Battalion. Contract annulled Nov. 13, ‘63. Toole, B. M., Surgeon. Sept. 30, ‘63, Acting Chief Surgeon Stevenson's Division.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Shiloh. (search)
brisk fire on that portion of the enemy who blocked our passage to the landing, who, after briskly returning our fire, fell back. We attempted by a rapid movement to cut our way through, but the enemy on our left advanced rapidly, pouring into our ranks a most destructive fire. To have held out longer would have been to suffer complete annihilation. The regiment was, therefore, compelled to surrender as prisoners of war. Colonel J. L. Geddes, of the Eighth Iowa, in his report dated November 13, page 166, says: I formed my regiment in line of battle with my center resting on the road leading from Corinth to Pittsburg landing, and at right angles with my line.. * * * About 3 P. M., all direct communications with the river ceased. * * * General Prentiss' division having been thrown back from the original line, I changed front by my left flank, conforming to his movements and at right angles with my former base, which was immediately occupied and retained for some time by the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), War Diary of Capt. Robert Emory Park, Twelfth Alabama Regiment. January 28th, 1863January 27th, 1864. (search)
Run and Rapidan river, and I was enabled to keep dry. A great favor. After Rodes' division waded the river we were marched down to Morton's Ford, arriving at half past 10 o'clock, and halting at the old camp ground we occupied before our tramp to Bristow Station after General Meade in October. Just one month from the time we left we returned. As sleep had been a stranger to me for two nights, I enjoyed my sleep, and all neuralgic pains left me, or were no longer noticed. Nov. 9, 10, 12, 13, 14 and 15. On picket duty, and annoyed by constant alarms most of the time. On last day were suddenly aroused by rapid succession of shells in our midst, warning us of the dangerous proximity of our foes. The 6th Alabama had three men wounded on out post. The 12th Alabama relieved them. Nov. 16 and 17. The 23d North Carolina relieved us. Colonel Pickens, thrown by his horse and injured severely. Worked on breastworks. Bob Wynn and Win. Mayo were assigned by General Lee to Co. F, fro
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.44 (search)
t and he was the picture of defeat and despair. He was killed by a member of Company G, called the Haymar Rifles, from Yazoo county. Colonel Haymar, for whom the company was named, was at the time visiting the regiment. He was presented with the skin, which he took back to Mississippi and had it made into a cap, and afterwards wore it on a second visit to the company the following spring. In all likelihood, it was the most exciting fox chase in the annals of such sports. About the 13th of November we received orders to march, and hurried with all speed towards Rapidan station. Burnside had moved from Warrenton, destined for Richmond. Then began a race between the two great armies which ended at Fredericksburg. McLaws' Division, composed of Kershaw's South Carolina, Semmes' Georgia, Cobb's Georgia and Barksdale's Mississippi Brigades, was under Jackson at that time. It was not a question if could we reach Fredericksburg ahead of Burnside. We were obliged to do so. The weather
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The cruise of the Shenandoah. (search)
ut on her all prisoners remaining with us. Captain and Mrs. Gilman and Mrs. Gage, of the Charter Oak, were profuse in their thanks for kindness Chile on board. November 12, overhauled the bark Adelaide, Captain I. P. Williams, of Mathews County, Va. The vessel was under the Argentine flag, but there was everything to show a bogus sale. Learning, however, positively that she belonged to a Southern sympathizer, after preparations (crew and effects removed) to burn her, we bonded her. November 13, captured and burned the schooner Lizzie M. Stacey, Captain Archer, from Boston for Honolulu. Four men out of the seven, shipped on the Shenandoah. Crossing the equator. On November 15, 1864, at I:30 A. M., we crossed the equator, or crossed the line, and an amusing break in routine and monotony occurred. There were many officers and men on board who had never before gone into the Southern hemisphere, I among the number. I was approached, as executive officer to know if I had an
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Barksdale's Mississippi Brigade at Fredericksburg. (search)
Read at Seventeenth annual reunion Louisiana Division U. C. V., Monroe, October 15, 1908, by Captain James Dinkins, member of the history committee. [The gallant Captain Dinkins has contributed frequently from his experience in the field to the newspaper press. Many graphic articles from his pen have appeared in the New Orleans Picayune.—Ed.] After the first Maryland campaign the Army of Northern Virginia rested for a short time in the beautiful Shenandoah Valley. About the 13th of November we received orders to march, and hurried with all speed towards Rapidan station. Burnside bad moved from Warrenton, destined for Richmond. Then began a race between the two great armies which ended at Fredericksburg. McLaws' Division, composed of Kershaw's South Carolina, Semmes' Georgia, Cobb's Georgia and Barksdale's Mississippi Brigades, was under Jackson at that time. It was not a question if we could reach Fredericksburg ahead of Burnside; we were obliged to do so. The weather
now marching in diametrically opposite directions, Sherman south-east and Hood northwest; while, as soon as Sherman started from Kingston, Grant became anxious not to capture the rebel capital, and not to drive Lee out of Petersburg. On the 13th of November, he said to Stanton: I would not, if I could, just now, do anything to force the enemy out of Richmond or Petersburg. It would liberate too much of a force to oppose Sherman with. His whole effort at this juncture was to protect and aid ththis concentration quite as well as the national authorities, and Breckenridge, with about three thousand men, was dispatched from West Virginia, to distract, if possible, some of the troops in Tennessee. He succeeded only too well. On the 13th of November, he attacked a force of fifteen hundred men under General Gillem, stationed near Morristown, in East Tennessee, driving them back as far as Knoxville, with a national loss of about two hundred, in killed, wounded, and prisoners. Thomas at o
d Thomas in war, nothing which is successful, is wrong. Thomas's plans and operations were now all dependent on the course that Hood might take when the designs of Sherman could no longer be concealed; and the forces at Florence were anxiously watched to ascertain whether the national army was to advance into Alabama, or remain for awhile on the defensive in Tennessee. Grant's first order to Thomas after Sherman moved was typical of his character and of what was to follow. On the 13th of November, Thomas telegraphed: Wilson reports to-night that the cavalry arms and equipments applied for some weeks since have not yet reached Louisville. Their non-arrival will delay us in preparing for the field. But it was still possible that Hood might re-cross the Tennessee, in pursuit of Sherman. In that event, not a moment must be lost; and Grant telegraphed at once: If Hood commences falling back, it will not do to wait for the full equipment of your cavalry, to follow. He should, in t
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