hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 2,937 results in 154 document sections:

... 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 37: Battle of Lovejoy's Station and capture of Atlanta (search)
n hour later one of Stanley's divisions made an endeavor to carry the enemy's works but did not succeed. After this partial attack, a little later in the day, Schofield's army came up to support the left of Thomas.. The effort resulted in about 100 prisoners, several of whom were commissioned officers. Now we notice that fromdquarters back at Cartersville, Smith commanding. About this time (September 29th), also, Thomas went to Chattanooga and as far as Nashville, while (October 3d) Schofield found his way, first to Knoxville, to attend to some official matters there, and thence to Chattanooga. All these personal movements naturally affected me, aed all that may be now condensed into one expression-the march from Atlanta to the sea. When his plan was finally settled, Thomas was to go back to Nashville; Schofield and Stanley with the Fourth and Twenty-third Corps to follow him. Besides these Thomas was to have control of all forces which he might need in my department (of
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 43: march through the Carolinas; the taking of Columbia (search)
the first intimation that the Confederates had evacuated Charleston. Gillmore's troops had entered the city, and captured a large amount of artillery and other stores. This was good news, brought by the negroes, who always enjoyed telling us such things, but it indicated to me an increased opposition to our advance; for already we were hearing not only of Hardee drawing in his various garrisons, but of Bragg, Cheatham, and Stephen D. Lee. We then knew that the remnants which Thomas and Schofield had not destroyed of Hood's army at Nashville, Tenn., as well as the troops from Augusta, Ga., were hastening to strengthen Hardee's resistance to our advance. We had about the same experience day after day with ever increasing obstacles, till we came near what is called Lynch's Creek, in ordinary times a stream not to exceed 200 feet; but when we approached, owing to the recent freshet, the creek overflowed its banks, and so, though not deep, it spread over a wide stretch of country, c
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 45: March through the Carolinas; the Battle of Bentonville; Johnston's surrender (search)
he other wing from behind Averysboro. His mind, fully determined, was to pass from the Cape Fear River to the Neuse, making Goldsboro his objective point. As Schofield and Terry had Wilmington, New Berne and Kinston, and were moving northward to form a junction with us, Sherman greatly desired to make this connection and secure was making preparation to continue our way to Goldsboro. We entered that city Friday, March 24th, having spanned the distance from Bentonville in two marches. Schofield was already there. The next day after our arrival our wagons that had been previously sent to Kinston came back with supplies of food. Sherman reviewed his trothence on to Warrenton; the right wing for a time along the Weldon road as far as Nahunta, and thence leftward to Pearce's Mill, and so northward to Warrenton. Schofield's army was to take a central route, passing by Whitley's Mill, and on to Rolesville, and thence to Warrenton; while Kilpatrick's cavalry, preceding my column, wa
arted by unexpected executive action. Colonel Orlando Brown, assistant commissioner for Virginia, had separated his State into districts and subdistricts about the same in extent as those of the President's military department commander, General Schofield. Brown obtained officers by detail from Schofield for superintendents. He had for supervision thirtyfour pieces of town property and 75,653 acres of land. Of this he had directly under cultivation by freedmen 2,625 acres. Under the PresiSchofield for superintendents. He had for supervision thirtyfour pieces of town property and 75,653 acres of land. Of this he had directly under cultivation by freedmen 2,625 acres. Under the President's orders he had already by November 30, 1865, returned to former owners 26,730 acres and 310 pieces of town property. In the counties of and near the peninsula of Virginia he had been able to try many experiments with a view to diminish the large accumulations of freedmen unfortunately massed near the harbor. He had secured almost an entire support of these as the result of their own labor during the summer. A colony of 100 freedmen for Liberia through a colored agent was transferred
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 55: first appropriation by congress for the bureau; the reconstruction Act, March 2, 1867; increase of educational work (search)
untry would be governed until the people of any State should adopt a constitution framed by a convention elected by male citizens without distinction of race, color, or previous condition of servitude, but still disfranchising participants in the rebellion. The new constitutions must grant suffrage to negroes and be submitted to Congress for approval. Civil governments where they existed were allowed to continue till the new were established. The districts were then organized with General Schofield in command of Virginia; General Sickles for North and South Carolina; General George H. Thomas for Georgia, Florida, and Alabama; General Ord for Mississippi and Arkansas, and General Sheridan for Louisiana and Texas. All these officers, as will appear, who were commanders of individual States, became ez-officio my assistant commissioners. Coincident with the Bureau work, the work of reconstruction along the lines of the new law now began and went on. In each State the assistant comm
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 69: transferred to New York city (search)
of Congress directed that they be returned to the cities. By the President's order sent through General Sherman our Military Division and Department of California went back from the Presidio to the Phelan Building in San Francisco. Sherman having retired, Sheridan was in command of the army till his death at Nonquitt, Mass., August 5, 1888. During his last illness he had been promoted to full generalship. This rank he held for about two months. As soon as his death was announced General Schofield was placed in command of the Army of the United States. About November 1, 1888, my adjutant general was temporarily absent and my presence at the headquarters of my division had never been more necessary, but by every mail I was receiving word of the extreme illness of my good mother, then living with my brother General C. H. Howard, at Glencoe, Ill. My brother wrote about that time: If you expect to see mother alive you must come quickly. This distressed me greatly, but I saw no
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 70: D. L. Moody on board the Spree; Spanish War, 1898; Lincoln Memorial University; conclusion (search)
Chapter 70: D. L. Moody on board the Spree; Spanish War, 1898; Lincoln Memorial University; conclusion While writing the life of Isabella, I felt the lack of local knowledge, and so determined, if I could get a leave of absence, to visit Spain. General Schofield, commanding the army, gave me permission to be absent from my headquarters from October 15th for two months. At that time I had on my personal staff Lieutenant Charles G. Treat Since Lieutenant-Colonel and Commandant of Cadets, United States Military Academy. as aid-de-camp, and he accompanied me, leaving New York October 15th, on the steamer Fulda, North German Lloyd. I enjoyed the passage from New York to Gibraltar exceedingly. On Sunday morning we had a public religious service at which I read selections from the sermons of Bishop Brooks. Noticing that an Italian Catholic priest, on his way from Kansas to Italy, did not participate in the service, I rallied him pleasantly on the subject. lie said that he had
. 8., I, 437. Sampson, William T., II, 571. 605 Sanders, L. W., II, 587. Sanders, William P., I, 492. San Francisco, In, II, 545, 548. Sargent, Frank, I, 89. Savannah, Ga., II, 86-100. Sawtelle, Charles G., I, 58. Sexton, Rufus, II, 95, 98, 99, 178. 191, 215, 217, 234, 238, 283. Saxton, Mrs., Rufus, II, 99. Saxton, Sam W., II, 99. Scammon, E. P., I, 302. Schenck, Robert C., I, 154, 390. Schimmelfennig, Alexander, I, 364, 365, 373, 414, 416, 445. Schofield, J. M., I, 492, 499-501, 503, 505, 507, 510, 511, 523, 528, 529, 532, 539, 542, 547, 550, 552, 554, 560-562, 565, 571, 573, 574, 576, 579-581, 586, 590-592, 595, 603-612; II, 4, 5, 7, 13, 14, 17, 26, 27, 29, 30, 33, 37, 43, 46, 51, 131, 145, 152, 154, 332, 549, 558. Schoolcraft, Madam, II, 459. Schurz, Carl, I, 264, 348, 349, 364, 366, 371, 375, 408, 411, 413, 414, 416,417,424,429,444,467,479,494. Schuyler, E., II, 513. Scott, Harvey, II, 463. Scott, Mrs., I, 143, 162. Scott,
ns, of Governor Rector's staff, fought with Capt. Reiff's company at Dug Springs. Lyon, believing it was the intention of the Confederates to draw him away from his supplies, retired to Springfield, while 2,000 regulars, under Major Sturgis and Lieutenant-Colonel Andrews, remained about four miles from the town. Meanwhile, the Confederates from Missouri and Arkansas moved down to Cassville, which is about fifteen miles north of the northern boundary of Arkansas, in Barry county, Mo. Maj. J. M. Schofield, of the First Missouri regiment, in his report as acting adjutant-general of the Federal army, said that General Lyon determined to make a night march on the 7th, with his entire force, toward Cassville, direct upon the front of the Confederate position, a day sooner, but was dissuaded from it on account of the exhausted condition of a large number of his troops. That day, and until the evening of the next, he spent in recruiting the strength of the men, supplying them with shoes an
Chapter 2: The battle of Wilson's Creek or Oak Hills Schofield's report description of the battlefield Colonel Snead's account reports of Generals McCulloch and Pearce other Confederate reports losses of Arkansas commands. In endeavoring to give an adequate account of the famous battle of Wilson's Creek or Oak Hills, August 10, 1861, it will be interesting to present a view of the situation from the opposing side, as well as from our own, bearing in mind that either party very naturally gives to his own side the most favorable aspect which it will bear. The report of Maj. J. M. Schofield, as assistant adjutant-general, army of the West, was as follows: During the forenoon of that day, the 9th of August, General Lyon and Colonel Sigel held a consultation, the result of which was the plan of attack upon the enemy's position at Wilson's creek, which led to the battle of the 10th. I was not present at the conference, having spent the morning in going the ro
... 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16