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l troops that could possibly be spared from the department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida were sent to the armies in Virginia and Georgia. On April 29, 1864, General Walker was ordered to Kinston, N. C., to take command of that post and soon afterward he was called by Beauregard to assist in the defense of Petersburg, at that time seriously threatened by Butler's advance. General Walker reached the army concentrated by Beauregard in time to share in the attack upon Butler. During a fight on May 20th he accidentally rode into the enemy's lines, and when called upon to surrender refused and was fired upon. His horse was killed and he was himself so severely wounded in the foot that amputation became necessary. He remained a prisoner of war until exchanged in the fall, when on the 29th of October he was placed in command at Weldon. He was commanding in North Carolina when the war ended. General Walker removed to Georgia after the war, and in 1898 was a citizen of Atlanta.
n of the railroad from Decatur to Spring Hill, the withdrawal of reinforcements from the army in the field, the destruction of numerous posts, and the relief of our people from the presence and oppression of the petty commanders of the captured garrisons. On the 16th of October, Forrest's command moved into west Tennessee, and in a few days Buford instituted a blockade of the Tennessee river. Fort Heiman and Paris landing were objective points which now had Forrest's attention. On October 29th, with Chalmers' division, he reached Paris landing, where Buford's division and Lyon's brigade were already on the ground. As usual, his force was magnified by the frightened enemy, and every post commander anticipated an attack. Gen. S. Meredith, commanding Federal forces at Paducah, under date of November 1st, said, All reports concur that he is to attack me soon. Meredith called for 1,500 more men to insure the safety of Columbus, and 2,000 more for Paducah. Later, on the same day,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
the 23d. The next day they rejoined the battery at Decatur, Ga., having been absent from the old command over six months. The re-organization. The number of men in the battery had been much reduced by its losses in Louisiana and Mississippi, so that Captain Rowan applied to the Secretary of War for seventy-five conscripts. While at Decatur the guns, horses and equipments of a four gun battery were received, and Dr. Thomas J. Rogers was assigned to the battery as surgeon. On the 29th of October, it was ordered to Sweet Water, East Tennessee, to rejoin Stevenson's division; whence, on the 5th of November, the whole division marched to reinforce General Bragg at Missionary Ridge. On the 12th, twenty-seven men were transferred to the battery from the Fortieth, Forty-first, Forty-third, Fifty-second and Fifty-sixth Georgia regiments to act as drivers. The battery encamped at the foot of Lookout Mountain on the 13th, and on the 23d joined Johnston's battalion, which was then enca
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Third battery of Maryland Artillery. (search)
the 23d. The next day they rejoined the battery at Decatur, Ga., having been absent from the old command over six months. The re-organization. The number of men in the battery had been much reduced by its losses in Louisiana and Mississippi, so that Captain Rowan applied to the Secretary of War for seventy-five conscripts. While at Decatur the guns, horses and equipments of a four gun battery were received, and Dr. Thomas J. Rogers was assigned to the battery as surgeon. On the 29th of October, it was ordered to Sweet Water, East Tennessee, to rejoin Stevenson's division; whence, on the 5th of November, the whole division marched to reinforce General Bragg at Missionary Ridge. On the 12th, twenty-seven men were transferred to the battery from the Fortieth, Forty-first, Forty-third, Fifty-second and Fifty-sixth Georgia regiments to act as drivers. The battery encamped at the foot of Lookout Mountain on the 13th, and on the 23d joined Johnston's battalion, which was then enca
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.10 (search)
The Shenandoah was built of teak, an Indian wood. She had quarter-inch iron plating, as well as iron knees and stanchions. Of 1,60 tons, English register, 320 feet in length, and 32 in breadth, her average speed was thirteen knots, though, when entirely under sail, with propeller unshipped and sails up, she often outdid this. At one time sailing down the Indian ocean, she made for four consecutive hours the high average rate of eighteen knots. First visitors. The morning of October 29th was clear and bright, and was made memorable by our first visitors on board. The stranger showed chase, but quickly changed his mind when a hustling shot across his bows said, Do come and see us, the first of fifty pressing invitations. Of this vessel's complement of ten men, eight joined our crew. I will not stop to enumerate in detail, said Dr. McNulty, who was here interrupted by the writer, but rise to indignantly deny as a base lie that Captain Waddell ever put a man in irons beca
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.24 (search)
Board at Chattanooga Aug. ‘62. Dec. 31, ‘62, 4th Florida, headquarters, A. T., Oct. 29, ‘63. Dec. 31, ‘63, 1st and 4th Florida. Bickley, G. W. L., Surgeon, A. any of War Sept. 1, ‘61, to rank from Sept. 1, ‘61. De Berry, M. L., Surgeon, Oct. 29, ‘61, 2d Arkansas Regiment, Dec. 31, ‘62, 2d Arkansas Regiment. May 9, ‘63 Tr.geon. April 30, ‘63, 1st Kentucky Cavalry, July 31, ‘63, 2d Kentucky Cavalry, Oct. 29, ‘63, assigned as Chief Surgeon, Armstrong's Division. Hunter, Alexander, A Aug. 20, ‘63, ordered to report to Gen. Forrest as Chief Surgeon of Division, Oct. 29, ‘63, relieved with Forrest's Division, ordered to report to Gen. Cheatham for McLane, John Thomas, Assistant Surgeon. Sept. 30, ‘63, 47th Georgia Regiment, Oct. 29, ‘63, relieved with 47th Georgia and ordered to report to S. H. Stout. Mangcom'd to Department Mississippi. Sayle, A. M. C,, Assistant Surgeon, corn. Oct. 29, ‘61, as A. S. 2d Arkansas. May 9, ‘63, transferr
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), War Diary of Capt. Robert Emory Park, Twelfth Alabama Regiment. January 28th, 1863January 27th, 1864. (search)
lle, once the scene of a severe cavalry engagement, on a tour of observation. The country round about resembles Fauquier county, being one vast field of destruction and devastation. Where once elegant, happy homes stood, bare chimneys rear their tall forms sentries over this cruel waste, halls that once resounded to the merry laughter of happy childhood, now reecho to the mournful whistling of the autumn winds. Everything we see is a memento of the relentless cruelty of our invaders. October 29 and 30. Some North Carolina troops relieved us from picket, and returned to the building of our winter quarters. Our Christian Association met and resolved to forbid playing of cards for pastime or amusement. New officers for next two months, President, Rev. H. D. Moore, Vice-President, Captain J. J. Nicholson, of company I, Secretary, Wat. P. Zachry, of company F. October 31. Made out muster and pay rolls for past two months. Learned that our newly built quarters would not be perma
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.28 (search)
; no engraver's name. $50, Commerce seated on a chest with a river in the background, and two sailors in the corner; engraved by Hoyer & Ludwig. The $100 is very inferior in design and engraving, and has in the center negroes loading cotton, while an overseer looks on; a sailor in the corner; engraved by Hoyer & Ludwig. Two interest-bearing bills (interest two per cent. a day) were issued early in 1862. The dates are written in ink, in one case being July 8th, 1862, and on the other October 29th, although the issue was made in April. One of these has a train of cars with the sea and a steamer in the background, and in the lower left corner a dashing looking milkmaid, with pail upon her head; engraved by J. T. Paterson. The other bill has a picture of negroes hoeing in a field, a portrait of Henry Clay to the left, and the figure of Ceres on the right; engraved by Keatinge & Ball. June 2d, 1862, the first issue of small bills was made. The $1 has an old-fashioned side-wheel s
g since been exhausted, he hopes to issue another by and by, to which he will add a copious Appendix, with various letters and several more illustrations. The work bears the title of ‘Israel Putnam and Bunker Hill,’ as the following is entitled ‘Israel Putnam and Prospect Hill.’ John F. Ayer, Esq., President Somerville Historical Society:— Dear Sir: I thank you very much for the copy you sent me of the Somerville Journal, containing a full account of the dedication, on the twenty-ninth of October, of Prospect Hill Park and Memorial Tower. The very appropriate and eloquent speeches, and all the proceedings of the occasion, as reported in that paper, are seen to have been most interesting and admirable, and you all are greatly to be congratulated on your signal success in such a commemoration of the important events of your local history that occurred at the outbreak of the Revolutionary War. I only regret that I could not be present, then and there, it would have been suc
12, bap. 18 Sept. 1720, adm. Camb. ch. 20 May, 1739, and Pct. ch. 9 Sept. 1739, m. Samuel Kent 27 Nov. 1740; Lucy, b. 29 Oct. bap. 4 Nov. 1722, adm. Pct. ch. 22 Mar. 1741, m. John Cutter, Jr., 21 May, 1745, d. 17 Ap. 1810, see Cutter (par. 9); ee Outer Book, 35; Wyman, 346. 3. Edward, prob. s. of John (1), had here Thomas, b. 8, bap. 11 June, 1749; Sarah, b. 29 Oct., bap. 12 Nov. 1752; Elizabeth, b. 5, bap. 19 Jan. 1755; Ruth, b. 25 Oct., bap. 6 Nov. 1757. Susanna, w. of Edward, d. 2bap. 9 Dec. 1781, perhaps a sister Mary, of Chas., was she who m. Jonathan C. Prentiss, 14 Aug. 1812, Camb.; Harriet, b. 29 Oct., bap. 23 Nov. 1783, by Rev. Mr. Marrett. See Wyman's Chas., 1028. The father was a Revolutionary soldier, and rated hedge as late as 1850. See Wyman, 1039, No. 21. 5. John, s. of John (2), m. Susanna Payne, 10 Oct. 1765. Had John, b. 29 Oct., bap. 2 Nov. 1766; Susanna, b. 8, bap. 14 Apr. 1771; William, b. 23 Aug., bap. 3 Sept. 1772; Josiah, b. 5, bap. 9 June,
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