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o'clock Gen. Elzey gave the command, and the procession started, marching in the following order: Gen. Elzey and Staff, mounted; the Public Guard, Lieut, Gay, commanding; the 44th N. C. regiment, Petrigrew's brigade, Col. Singletary commanding; the Armory Band, playing a funeral dirge; Col. Frank Skinner, 1st Va. regiment, and some of the Governor's Aids; the hearse containing the body, surmounted by raven plumes, and drawn by two white horses; the Staff of Gen. Jackson, including Major Pendleton, Adjutant General; Major W. I Hawkes, Chief Commissary of the Corps; Major D. B. Bridgford, Chief Provost; Capt. Douglas, Lieut. Smith, Aids-de Camp; Dr McGuire, Surgeon, and others; the members of the City Council, two abreast, and lastly, an immense host of citizens and strangers. The procession thus formed, (the military with reversed arms.) marched slowly to the corner of 9th street, and turned towards Main, entering the Capitol Square by the gate on Grace street. The military h
of Hamilton's Crossing and opposite this place, on the other side of the river, and, as I supposed, to give him battle if he should offer it. About 2 o'clock on Sunday morning, having thrown a pontoon bridge over the river, the enemy commenced crossing into Fredericksburg in large numbers. General Early was then with his entire division at Hamilton's Crossing. I at once informed him of the fact, and asked for reinforcements. With several batteries, which were under the command of Gen. Pendleton, and a single brigade of infantry, I had a front of not less than three miles to defend, extending from Taylor's hill, on the left, to the foot of the hills in rear of the Howison house, and not "the short line in rear of and to the left of Fredericksburg," as stated by Gen. Early. The 21st regiment was posted between the Marye house and the plankroad, three companies of which were afterwards sent to the support of the 18th regiment, which was stationed behind the stone wall at the Mary
he Virginia State elections will take place on Thursday next. In this election soldiers will be allowed to vote in their camps for Governor, Lieutenant-Governor, Attorney-General, members of the Confederate Congress, members of the General Assembly; and those whose homes are within the third district will have the privilege of voting for a member of the Board of Public Works. The third district is composed of the following counties: Prince William, Alexandria, Fairfax, Fauquier, Loudoun, Jefferson, Clarke, Warren, Page, Shenandoah, Hardy, Frederick, Hampshire, Berkeley, Morgan, Pendleton, Randolph, Barbour, Upshur, Tucker, Roane, Harrison, Preston, Monongalia, Marion, Taylor, Braxton, Lewis, Doddridge, Tyler, Wetzel, Marshall, Ohio, Brooke, Hancock, Ritchie, Gilmer, Wood, Wirt, Mason, Jackson, Pleasants. Refugees will be required to vote at the Court-House of the county or corporation in which they may be sojourning, and will not be allowed to vote at any other precinct.
os Scott. Prince Edward--T T Treadway. Rappahannock — J T Fletcher. Rockbridge — S McD Reid, --White Smyth — J H Thompson. Southampton — Pretlow. Spotsylvania — J L Marye, Jr. Warren — Samuel W Thomas. Washington — A C Commings,--Graham. Pendleton — Sanders. Hardy — Chas Williams. The following additional county returns have been received: James City County.--A poll was held on election day several miles below the Confederate lines in James City county, with the following resu House Delegates. Hardy--Polls were held at three precincts in this county, with the following result:--Governor: Flournoy, 93; Smith, 26; Munford, 13. Lieutenant-Governor: Price, 64; Imboden, 66. Congress: Boteler, 117; Holiday, 13. Pendleton.--Governor: Smith, 113; Flournoy, 28, Munford, 31. Lieutenant-Governor: Price, 61; Imboden, 103. Congress: Letcher, 123; Baldwin, 66. State Senate: Pennybacker, 108; Coffman, 14; Gray, 12; Hiner, 58. Shenandoah.--Governor: Smit
One hundred dollars reward. --Ranaway from the subscriber, June 27, near Richmond, my negro boy Pendleton, about 19 or 20 years old; five feet six or seven inches high; very black; dressed rather military. A. H. Rogers, A. D. C. jy 7--6t* Maj. Gen. D. H. Hill.
ing his parole. He succeeded in running the blockade from Wilmington, North Carolina, about the middle of June, in a small steamer which took him to Bermuda. From the latter place he proceeded in a small steamer to Halifax, where he arrived safely a few days ago, and took passage up the river St. Lawrence to Quebec, whence he came by rail to Clifton. Hon. D. W. Vorhess, of Indiana, and Hon. Richard T. Merrick, of Chicago, were among the first to welcome him on his arrival. Hon. Messrs. Pendleton and McL are shortly expected to arrive. A Western opinion about the Mississippi being open. The Chicago Times, commenting on the great rejoicing at the East--for they are even greater in New England than they are in Illinois--over the re-opening of the Mississippi river, says: The vast expectations which have been built upon the events of the past few weeks in the Southwest will now receive the test of fulfillment or non fulfillment.--The opening of the Mississippi has b
ects. His manners are modest and unassuming. He has a kind word and genial greeting for all his friends. Yet his manners are not wanting in dignity belitting his position; but the dignity is blended with cordial suavity, so that while he commands respect from every one, he at the same time excites a feeling akin to love in all. Mr. Vallandigham was treated in all respects as a prisoner of war in the South, and permitted to depart on giving his parole. He succeeded in running the blockade from Wilmington, North Carolina, about the middle of June, in a small steamer which took him to Bermuda. From the latter place he proceeded in a small steamer to Halifax, where he arrived safely a few days ago, and took passage up the river St. Lawrence to Quebec, whence he came by rail to Clifton. Hon. D. W. Vorhess, of Indiana, and Hon. Richard T. Merrick, of Chicago, were among the first to welcome him on his arrival. Hon. Messrs. Pendleton and McL are shortly expected to arrive.
e last Scene of all — his death. On Thursday evening all pain had ceased; but a mortal prostration came on, from which he never recovered. He still conversed feebly, and said: "I consider these wounds a blessing; they were given me for some good and wise purpose, and I would not part with them if I could." From this time he continued to sink, and on Sunday morning it was obvious that he could only live a few hours longer. His mind was still clear, however, and he asked Major Pendleton, his Adjutant General, "who was preaching at headquarters on that day?" Mrs. Jackson was with him during his last moments, and conversed with him fully and freely. She informed him that he was about to die, and his reply was: "Very good, very good; it is all right!" He then sent messages to all his friends, the Generals and others, and murmured in a low voice his wish to be buried in "Lexington, in the Valley of Virginia." His mind then began to wander, and that deliri
ne, or who may intend to remove from this State to the United States to avoid the operations of the conscript or militia law, and to provide for the sequestrations or confiscation of such property, under proper restrictions. By Mr. Miller--That the Committee on Confederate Relations inquire into the expediency of adopting some measures by which the property of the citizens of the Commonwealth may be more secure from illegal and unreasonable impressment by the Confederate Government. By Mr. Pendleton--That the Committee of Courts of Justice inquire into the expediency of so amending the first section of chapter 3 of the Code of Virginia as to exclude from rights of citizenship all persons resident of this State who have voluntarily, since the 17th day of April, 1861, held, or may hereafter hold, any office, civil, military, or judicial, under the Government of the United States, or under any usurped Government of this State, organized at Wheeling, or elsewhere in Virginia; and also
cents per pound; silver five dollars in currency at Brownsville, Texas. Planters are cheerfully according tithes to the Government. Thirty-two of Lincoln's Louisiana overseers are at Huntsville, to be sent to Eagle Pass for their liberation. The country in that region is a desert. Foolish reports are spread through Texas like wildfire. It is reported that President Davis and Gen. Bragg are both dead, and that Gen. Lee has been superceded. Gen. Taylor is in great repute. Pendleton has been elected Governor by a small majority. Herbert, Sexton, and Branch are elected to Congress. Military matters are quiet. The people and troops are prepared to repel invasion. The health of the State is good. The Indians on the frontier are troublesome. An average of fourteen vessels are constantly off Galveston, blockading the harbor. Great confidence is felt in Gen. Magruder. The crops in Texas are unprecedentedly large. Wheat and corn enough are made t
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