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The Betrayer of General Morgan. --A letter in the Lynchburg Virginian gives the following facts in relation to the treachery that led to General Morgan's death: The Mrs. Williams, whose guest he was, is an old lady, a widow, and a true SouGeneral Morgan's death: The Mrs. Williams, whose guest he was, is an old lady, a widow, and a true Southern woman. She would be the last person in the world to entrap even an enemy by professions of friendship and hospitality. She was a personal friend of General Morgan's. She knew nothing of the enemy until they had surrounded her house, when she General Morgan's. She knew nothing of the enemy until they had surrounded her house, when she at once roused the General from his sleep and assisted him to escape from the house. She has a son, an officer in our cavalry, and has done as much for our men and suffered as much from the enemy as any one. The "Mrs. Williams" suspected of betraying Morgan is the wife of a near relation of the old lady, of the same name, whose husband is at Knoxville. She was herself a guest of the house, and may, or may not, have given the information. If she did, it was a work of supererogation, for the t
General Morgan's remains. --The remains of General John H. Morgan will probably reach this city to-night by the Lynchburg train, and will be received at the depot by the Kentucky delegation in Congress and all other citizens of Kentucky in the city, the military authorities, and such citizens as choose to unite in this last act of respect to the illustrious chief. The remains will be taken to the Capitol, where they will lie in state until the following day at 12 o'clock M., when they wilGeneral John H. Morgan will probably reach this city to-night by the Lynchburg train, and will be received at the depot by the Kentucky delegation in Congress and all other citizens of Kentucky in the city, the military authorities, and such citizens as choose to unite in this last act of respect to the illustrious chief. The remains will be taken to the Capitol, where they will lie in state until the following day at 12 o'clock M., when they will be taken to the Hollywood Cery and deposited in a vault.
Obsequies of General John H. Morgan. --At an early hour yesterday morning the remains of General John H. Morgan arrived at the Danville depot in this city. At 10 o'clock they were placed in a hearse and escorted to the Capitol by the Public Guard, Captain Gay, and the Fire Brigade, Captain Charters, attended by the Armory BGeneral John H. Morgan arrived at the Danville depot in this city. At 10 o'clock they were placed in a hearse and escorted to the Capitol by the Public Guard, Captain Gay, and the Fire Brigade, Captain Charters, attended by the Armory Band. Here they were deposited in the Hall of the House of Representatives, where, covered with the flag of his country, they lay in state until 1 o'clock. During this time, although the coffin was not opened, the hall was visited by a large number of ladies and gentlemen, who gazed silently upon the box that enclosed the remains of the departed here, and as silently withdrew. But ten months ago, Morgan, then just returned from a Northern prison, appeared in the same hall, full of life and hope, and received the congratulations of many who yesterday paid the last sad tribute to his memory, and could scarcely realize the fact that be was no more. Fune
Proceedings of the Hustings Court Relative to General Morgan's death. --The Hustings Court yesterday adopted the following resolutions, and ordered that they be spread upon the journal: "The Court, uniting with their fellow-citizens throughout the Confederate States in deep regret for the death of General John H. Morgan, who, after filling numerous and arduous posts of duty to his country, has fallen as became a valiant soldier, in the country's cause, therefore be it. "Resolved,General John H. Morgan, who, after filling numerous and arduous posts of duty to his country, has fallen as became a valiant soldier, in the country's cause, therefore be it. "Resolved, That as a tribute to the memory of the deceased, this Court will attend his funeral in a body, and will wear the usual badge of mourning for thirty days. "Resolved, That a copy of these proceedings be transmitted by the clerk to the family of the deceased, with an assurance of the deep sympathy of the court in the bereavement they have sustained." As a further mark of respect the Court then adjourned.
Hustings Court, yesterday. --Upon the opening of this court yesterday, a preamble and resolutions, presented by the Commonwealth's Attorney, was adopted in honor of the remains of General John H. Morgan. [They will be found above.] J. N. Hoeffich, charged with the murder of a negro boy in his employ, was arraigned for examination; but, on account of the absence of important witnesses, the case was postponed till the next term. In the case of Fanny Lewis, charged with a misdemeanor, a fieri facias was awarded. John Ferguson and William Snellings, charged with exhibiting the game of fare, were required to give security in the sum of $5,000 each for their appearance at the next term. Wilcher A. Morris, indicted for stealing two hundred and twenty dollars in Confederate States notes, was tried and acquitted. Charles Kennedy and Thomas L. Crouch, charged with retailing ardent spirits at their saloon at the corner of Tenth and Main streets, were fined sixty do
Colonel W. the Confederacy as an officer of and gallantry, has been placed at command of the late General Morgan's cavalry.
Governor Allen, of Louisiana, recognizing the powerful and beneficial influences of the press, has imported paper enough to keep them all going for a year and exempted all the printers from State service. The late Major-General John H. Morgan was an Alabamian. He was born in Huntsville in 1825. His parents moved to Kentucky when he was six years old. The Council of State of North Carolina, which met in Raleigh on Thursday, the 5th instant, refused to convene the General Assembly in extra session. Commander Loon Smith, who was the hero of the naval affair at Galveston, has gone to Europe, from whence it is expected he will make his appearance in a Confederate cruiser. An exchange thinks there is "trouble brewing" at the North. It's not only brewing — it's already "on draft." The Charlotte (North Carolina) Democrat states that sorghum molasses is selling there for five dollars per gallon. The hog crop in Georgia this year is very heavy. An Imp
were dressed in soldier clothes. They claim to be cousins, and state that before the war they lived with their uncle in Southwestern Virginia; but about two years since he left them and went over to the Yankees. They then attired themselves in male apparel, and were admitted into a cavalry company, attached to the Confederate service. A few months after their enlistment they encountered a force of Yankees, were defeated and captured with the rest of the company; but subsequently, General John H. Morgan, with reinforcements, overtook the Yankees who had them in charge, causing such a precipitate retreat that they were compelled to abandon their prisoners.--After three months service in the cavalry they joined the Thirty-sixth Virginia infantry, and have been with it up to the present time. On one occasion Mobile killed three Yankees while on picket, and on her return to the brigade was promoted for gallantry to a corporally. The corporal has missed but one battle — that of Cedar
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