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Diony'sius 25. Of HALICARNASSUS, the most celebrated among the ancient writers of the name of Dionysius. He was the son of one Alexander of Halicarnassus, and was born, according to the calculation of Dodwell, between B. C. 78 and 54. Strabo (xiv. p.656) calls him his own contemporary. His death took place soon after B. C. 7, the year in which he completed and published his great work on the history of Rome. Respecting his parents and education we know nothing, nor any thing about his position in his native place before he emigrated to Rome; though some have inferred from his work on rhetoric, that he enjoyed a great reputation at Halicarnassus. All that we know for certain is, the information which he himself gives us in the introduction to his history of Rome (1.7), and a few more particulars which we may glean from his other works. According to his own account, he went to Italy immediately after the termination of the civil wars, about the middle of Ol. 187, that is, B. C. 29. Henc
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Flaccus, Vale'rius 15. L. Valerius Flaccus, a son of No. 11, served in Cilicia as tribune of the soldiers, under P. Servilius, in B. C. 78, and afterwards as quaestor, under M. Calpurnius Piso, in Spain. (Cic. pro FLacc. 3.) He was praetor in B. C. 63, the year of Cicero's consulship, who through his assistance got possession of the documents which the Allobrogian ambassadors had received from the accomplices of Catiline. In the year after his praetorship he had the administration of Asia, in which he was succeeded by Q. Cicero. (Cic. pro Flacc. 13, 14, 21, 40.) In B. C. 59 he was accused by D. Laelius of having been guilty of extortion in his province of Asia; but Flaccus, although he was undoubtedly guilty, was defended by Cicero (in the oration pro Flacco, which is still extant) and Q. Hortensius, and was acquitted. (Comp. Cic. in Cut. 3.2, 6 ; ad Att. 1.19, 2.25, in Pison, 23; the oration pro Flacco; pro Planc. 11; Schol. Bob. p. Flacc. p.228 ; Sallust, Sal. Cat. 45.)
Gra'nius 5. GRANIUS, decurio of Puteoli in B. C. 78. A tax had been imposed on the Italian cities for the restoration of the Capitol at Rome, which had been burnt down during the civil war between Marius and Sulla, B. C. 83. Granius, in anticipation of Sulla's death, which was daily expected, kept back the levy on his municipium. Sulla, highly incensed at the delay, since he had set his heart on dedicating the Capitol, and inscribing it with his name, summoned Granius to his house at Cumae, and caused him to be strangled in his presence. (Plut. Sull. 37; V. Max. 9.3.8.)
Hyrcanus Ii. (*(Urkano/s), high priest and king of the Jews, was the eldest son of Alexander Jannaeus, and his wife, Alexandra. On the death of Alexander (B. C. 78) the royal authority devolved, according to his will, upon his wife Alexandra, who immediately appointed Hyrcanus to the high-priesthood -- a choice which he probably owed not so much to his seniority of age, as to his feeble, indolent character, which offered a strong contrast to the daring, ambitious spirit of his younger brother, Aristobulus. Accordingly, during the nine years of his mother's reign, he acquiesced uniformly in all her measures, and attached himself to the party of the Pharisees, which she favoured. On the death of Alexandra (B. C. 69), he succeeded, for a time, to the sovereign power, but Aristobulus, who had already taken his measures, quickly raised an army, with which he defeated him near Jericho, and compelled him to take refuge in the citadel of Jerusalem, where he was soon induced to consent to a tr
idate against the wishes of the all-powerful Sulla, exerted himself warmly to secure the election of Lepidus, and not only succeeded, but brought him in by more votes than his colleague, Q. Lutatius Catulus, who belonged to the ruling party. Sulla viewed all these proceedings with great indifference, and contented himself with warning Pompey, when he met him returning in pride from the election, that he had strengthened one who would be his rival. The death of Sulla in the following year, B. C. 78, soon after Lepidus and Catulus had entered upon their consulship, determined Lepidus to make the bold attempt to rescind the laws of Sulla and overthrow the aristocratical constitution which he had established. There were abundant materials of discontent in Italy, and it would not have been difficult to collect a numerous army; but the victory of the aristocratical party was too firmly secured by Sulla's military colonies to fear any attempts that Lepidus might make, since he did not posse
the first of the Maccabees who assumed the kingly title, which was henceforth borne by his successors. His reign lasted only a year (B. C. 106-105). [ARISTOBULUS, No. 1.] He was succeeded by his brother, Alexander Jannaeus 6. reigned B. C. 105-78. [ALEXANDER JANNAEUS, Vol. I. p. 117.] He was succeeded by his widow, Alexandra 7. appointed her son Hyrcanus II. to the priesthood, and held the supreme power B. C. 78-69. On her death in the latter year her son, Hyrcanus II. 8. obtained theXANDER JANNAEUS, Vol. I. p. 117.] He was succeeded by his widow, Alexandra 7. appointed her son Hyrcanus II. to the priesthood, and held the supreme power B. C. 78-69. On her death in the latter year her son, Hyrcanus II. 8. obtained the kingdom, B. C. 69, but was supplanted almost immediately afterwards by his brother, Aristobulus II. 9. who obtained the throne B. C. 68. [ARISTOBULUS, No. 2.] For the remainder of the history of the house of the Maccabees see HYRCANUS II. and HERODES I.
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Alexander Jannaeus 6. reigned B. C. 105-78. [ALEXANDER JANNAEUS, Vol. I. p. 117.] He was succeeded by his widow,
Alexandra 7. appointed her son Hyrcanus II. to the priesthood, and held the supreme power B. C. 78-69. On her death in the latter year her son,
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Macer, C. Lici'nius 1. A Roman annalist and orator, was the father of C. Licinius Calvus [CALVUS], and must have been born about B. C. 110. He was quaestor probably in B. C. 78, was tribune of the plebs B. C. 73, was subsequently raised to the praetorship and became governor of a province. He was distinguished by his hostility towards C. Rabirius, whom he charged (B. C. 73) with having been accessory to the death of Saturninus, an offence for which the same individual was brought to trial a second time ten years afterwards. Macer himself was impeached by Cicero, A. D. 66, when the latter was praetor, under the law De Repetundis; and finding that, notwithstanding the influence of Crassus, with whom he was closely allied, the verdict was against him, he instantly committed suicide, before all the forms were completed, and thus saved his family from the dishonour and loss which would have been entailed upon them had he been regularly sentenced. This is the account given by Valerius Maxim
Mani'lius 6. L. Manilius, praetor probably in B. C. 79, had the government of Narbonese Gaul, with the title of proconsul, in B. C. 78. In the latter year he crossed over into Spain, with three legions and 1500 horse, to assist Metellus in the war against Sertorius; but he was defeated by Hirtuleius, one of the generals of Sertorius, lost his camp and baggage, and escaped almost alone into the town of Ilerda. (Oros. 5.22; Liv. Epit. 90; Plut. Sert. 12.)
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