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rigade on the right of the Southern battle array, was screened by the tangled thickets from the view of his own troops, flushed with the success of brilliant flank movement. The graveyard of three campaigns As this photograph was taken, May 12, 1864, the dead again were being brought to unhappy Fredericksburg, where slept thousands that had fought under Burnside and Hooker. Now, once more, the sad cavalcade is arriving, freighted still more heavily. The half-ruined homes, to which some f the 8th. But the smoke and flames from the burning forests that surrounded Spotsylvania Court House: where Grant wanted to fight it out For miles around this quaint old village-pump surged the lines of two vast contending armies, May 8-12, 1864. In this picture of only a few months later, the inhabitants have returned to their accustomed quiet, although the reverberations of battle have hardly died away. But on May 7th Generals Grant and Meade, with their staffs, had started toward t
ent of the Federal trains, Lee, with his usual sagacious foresight, surmised their destination. He therefore ordered General R. H. Anderson, now in command of Longstreet's corps, to march to Spotsylvania Court House at three o'clock on the morning of the 8th. But the smoke and flames from the burning forests that surrounded Spotsylvania Court House: where Grant wanted to fight it out For miles around this quaint old village-pump surged the lines of two vast contending armies, May 8-12, 1864. In this picture of only a few months later, the inhabitants have returned to their accustomed quiet, although the reverberations of battle have hardly died away. But on May 7th Generals Grant and Meade, with their staffs, had started toward the little courthouse. As they passed along the Brock Road in the rear of Hancock's lines, the men broke into loud hurrahs. They saw that the movement was still to be southward. But chance had caused Lee to choose the same objective. Misinterpreti
Union, Sheridan's Cav.; Confed., Stuart's Cav. Losses: Union, 50 killed, 174 wounded, 200 missing; Confed., killed and wounded not recorded, 100 captured; Confed., Maj.-Gen. J. E. B. Stuart and Brig.-Gen. Jas. B. Gordon killed. May 12-16, 1864: Fort Darling, Drewry's Bluff, Va. Union, Army of the James, Gen. B. F. Butler, commanding; Tenth Corps; Eighteenth Corps; Confed., Gen. Beauregard's command. Losses: Union, 390 killed, 2380 wounded, 1390 missing; Confed., 400 killed, 2000 wounded, 100 missing. May 12-17, 1864: Kautz's raid on Petersburg and Lynchburg Railroad, Va. Union, 6 killed, 28 wounded. May 13-16, 1864: Resaca, Ga. Union, Fourth, Fourteenth, Twentieth, and Cavalry Corps, Army of the Cumberland, Maj.-Gen. Thomas; Fifteenth and Sixteenth Corps, Army of the Tennessee, Maj.-Gen. McPherson, and Twenty-third Corps, Army of the Ohio, Maj.-Gen. Schofield; Confed., Army of Tennessee, Gen. J. E. Johnston, commanding; Army of Mississ
tured ambulances, caissons, and many led horses. Near at hand was Thompson's battery, wholly unmindful of danger, and this Custer essayed to take. But Colonel Chew, commander of the battalion of artillery to which this belonged, deployed a South Carolina regiment to hold Custer in check until he could get another battery into position. This he soon did, and Rosser, coming up with his brigade at the moment, A war-time view of Stuart's grave Gen'l Stuart--wounded May 11, 1864--died May 12, 1864. This simple head-slab on its wooded hill near Richmond toward the close of the war spelt a heavy blow to the Confederate cause. In that struggle against heavier and heavier odds, every man counted. And when destroying Fate chose for its victim the leader whose spirit had never fallen, whose courage had never failed, no matter how dangerous the raid, how fierce the charge and counter-charge — well might the Confederacy mourn. To the memory of this American chevalier, tributes came not
chusetts--one of the best-managed Federal prisons. Lining up for rations from the conquerors Confederate prisoners at Belle Plain, captured at Spotsylvania, May 12, 1864 Capture was not an unmixed evil for the Confederate soldiers in the Wilderness campaign. The Army of Northern Virginia had already taken up a hole in its bere captured near their base of supplies at Belle Plain were sure at least of a good meal. The Confederate prisoners here shown were captured at Spotsylvania, May 12, 1864, by the Second Corps under General Hancock. They were taken to Belle Plain, where they found not only a Union brigade left to guard them but a brigade commisg a sufficient quantity of wood, since raw rations were issued Where blue and gray were cared for alike—after Spotsylvania In the battle of Spotsylvania, May 12, 1864, General Edward Johnson's division of seven thousand men were taken prisoners at the salient known as Bloody Angle. Some of the wounded prisoners were placed
in May, 1864 Over fifty thousand hand-stretchers of various patterns were issued by the Union Government during the war. It was by means of them that the removal of the helpless wounded from the battlefield was effected. The best pattern of hand-stretcher weighed twenty-four pounds, was quickly collapsible when not required, and possessed legs which made its temporary use as a cot readily possible. This photograph shows the wounded on Marye's Heights after the battle at Spotsylvania, May 12, 1864. The wounded man on the stretcher is gazing rather grimly at the camera. His hand is bound up, and his foot showing at the end of the stretcher is bare. The poor fellow in the foreground seems pretty far gone. His face is as pale as the blanket which covers him. The whole group of strong men struck down typifies the awful effects of war. But the transportation results achieved in these ways were usually possible only over short distances. The organization of the medical service m
in May, 1864 Over fifty thousand hand-stretchers of various patterns were issued by the Union Government during the war. It was by means of them that the removal of the helpless wounded from the battlefield was effected. The best pattern of hand-stretcher weighed twenty-four pounds, was quickly collapsible when not required, and possessed legs which made its temporary use as a cot readily possible. This photograph shows the wounded on Marye's Heights after the battle at Spotsylvania, May 12, 1864. The wounded man on the stretcher is gazing rather grimly at the camera. His hand is bound up, and his foot showing at the end of the stretcher is bare. The poor fellow in the foreground seems pretty far gone. His face is as pale as the blanket which covers him. The whole group of strong men struck down typifies the awful effects of war. But the transportation results achieved in these ways were usually possible only over short distances. The organization of the medical service m
,666Reports of losses not complete Spotsylvania, Va., May 10, 18647533,3474,100Reports incomplete Spotsylvania, Va., May 12, 18646,0208006,820Records of losses not shown Drewry's Bluff, Va., May 12-16, 18643902,3801,3904,160Reports incomplete ColMay 12-16, 18643902,3801,3904,160Reports incomplete Cold Harbor, Va., June 1-3, 186412,000Reports incomplete Petersburg, Va., June 15-30, 18642,0139,9354,62116,569Estimated loss in Hill's Corps and Field and Kershaw's divisions, 2,970 Atlanta Campaign, Ga., May, 1864 (including Buzzard's Roost, Snake Ce Group no. 2 major-generals William D. Pender Gettysburg July 18, 1863. J. E. B. Stuart, Yellow Tavern May 12, 1864. Stephen D. Ramseur, Cedar Creek October 19, 1864. W. H. T. Walker, Atlanta July 22, 1864. Patrick R. Cleburne,20213.7 Confederate generals killed in battle group no. 7 Brigadier-generals Abner Perrin Spotsylvania May 12, 1864. W. E. Jones, Piedmont June 5. 1864. George doles, Bethesda Church May 30, 1864. Robert H. Anderson, Antietam O
June, 1862; the dash on Pope's headquarters at Catlett's Station, Virginia, and the raid on Manassas Junction in August; the expedition into Pennsylvania after Antietam, and the cooperation with Jackson at Chancellorsville. After the wounding of Jackson in that battle, he had temporary command of the Second Corps, Army of Northern Virginia. In the Wilderness campaign of 1864, he was very active, but was mortally wounded in an encounter with Sheridan's cavalry at Yellow Tavern. He died May 12, 1864. Lieutenant-General Wade Hampton was born in Charleston, South Carolina, March 28, 1818. He was one of the largest slave-owners in the South. At the outbreak of the Civil War, he raised and equipped, in part, Hampton's South Carolina Legion, of which he was colonel. He was wounded at Fair Oaks, as brigadier-general at the head of a brigade, and thrice at Gettysburg, where he commanded a cavalry Brigade. In August, 1863, he was made major-general with a division in the cavalry,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Detailed Minutiae of soldier life. (search)
soldier life. By Private Carlton McCarthy. Paper no. 5--improvised infantry — to Appomattox Courthouse. Sunday, April 2d, 1865, found Cutshaw's battalion of artillery occupying the earthworks at Fort Clifton, on the Appomattox, about two miles below Petersburg, Virginia. The command was composed of the Second company Richmond Howitzers, Captain Lorraine F. Jones, Garber's battery, Fry's battery and remnants of five other batteries (saved from the battle of Spotsylvania Courthouse, May 12, 1864), and had present for duty nearly five hundred men, with a total muster roll, including the men in prison, of one thousand and eighty. The place — the old Clifton house --was well fortified, and had the additional protection of the river along the entire front of perhaps a mile. The works extended from the Appomattox on the right to Swift creek on the left. There were some guns of heavy calibre, mounted and ready for action, and in addition to these some field-pieces disposed along t
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