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  2 Poplar Spring Church, Va.   1   1 Boydton Road, Va. 1 7   8 Hatcher's Run, Va., March, 1865 1 3   4 Siege of Petersburg, Va. 6 34 1 41   Totals 142 807 268 1,217 Pres The enrollment includes 303 men, transferred from the One Hundred and Ninth Pennsylvania, in March, 1865, after the fighting had ended. Total of killed and wounded, 549. battles. K. & M. W.ment given above being the number enrolled up to that time; three new companies were added in March, 1865. As an acknowledgment of the superior qualities of the Battalion, it was furnished, in 1864,g. In November, 1864, the corps marched with Sherman through Georgia to the sea, and then in March, 1865, through the Carolinas. At Bentonville, the last battle of the Fourtenth Corps, the divisioncum's Expedition against Jackson, Miss. On July 29, 1864, it moved to Morganzia, La., and in March, 1865, it was engaged in the siege operations about Mobile, and in the fighting at Fort Blakely. I<
effective resistance, Gordon's men had possession of the Fort and the batteries. Only after one of the severest engagements of the siege were the Confederates driven back. General John B. Gordon, C. S. A. Gracie's salient — after Gordon's forlorn hope had charged Prisoners to Phil Sheridan: full rations at last. This group of the five thousand Confederate prisoners captured March 31st is eloquent of the tragedy in progress. Dire was the extremity of the Confederate cause in March, 1865. The words of the gallant leader in the last desperate and forlorn hope that charged Fort Stedman, General Gordon, give a pen-picture of the condition of the Southern fighting men: Starvation, literal starvation, was doing its deadly work. So depleted and poisoned was the blood of many of Lee's men from insufficient and unsound food that a slight wound, which would probably not have been reported at the beginning of the war, would often cause blood-poison, gangrene and death, yet the sp
effective resistance, Gordon's men had possession of the Fort and the batteries. Only after one of the severest engagements of the siege were the Confederates driven back. General John B. Gordon, C. S. A. Gracie's salient — after Gordon's forlorn hope had charged Prisoners to Phil Sheridan: full rations at last. This group of the five thousand Confederate prisoners captured March 31st is eloquent of the tragedy in progress. Dire was the extremity of the Confederate cause in March, 1865. The words of the gallant leader in the last desperate and forlorn hope that charged Fort Stedman, General Gordon, give a pen-picture of the condition of the Southern fighting men: Starvation, literal starvation, was doing its deadly work. So depleted and poisoned was the blood of many of Lee's men from insufficient and unsound food that a slight wound, which would probably not have been reported at the beginning of the war, would often cause blood-poison, gangrene and death, yet the sp
d; Confed., 70 killed, 400 wounded, 375 missing. February 22, 1865: Douglas Landing, Pine Bluff, Ark. Union, 13th Ill. Cav.; Confed., troops of Gen. Kirby Smith's command. Losses: Union, 40 killed and wounded; Confed., 26 killed and wounded. February 27, 1865 to march 25: Cavalry raid in Virginia. Union, First and Third divisions of Sheridan's Cav.; Confed., Gen. Jubal Early's command. Losses: Union, 35 killed and wounded; Confed., 1667 prisoners. March, 1865. March 2, 1865: Waynesboro, Va. Union, Sheridan's Cavalry Corps. Confed., Maj.-Gen. Jubal Early's command, Rosser's Cav. Signs of peace. Never again to be used by brother against brother, these Confederate guns captured in the defenses about Richmond are parked near the wharves on the James River ready for shipment to the national arsenal at Washington, once more the capital of a united country. The reflection of these instruments of destruction on the peaceful surfac
ch picketed the roads leading in the direction of the Federal forces upon the occasion of Jackson's famous raid around Pope's army to Manassas Junction. At Antietam he commanded a brigade of dismounted cavalry, comprising the Second and Twelfth Virginia regiments and eight guns, and he was with Longstreet and Hill at South Mountain. General Munford and General Rosser were two brigadiers of Fitzhugh Lee when the latter assumed command of all the cavalry of the Army of Northern Virginia in March, 1865. Munford's diminished brigade was swept before the Federal infantry fighting bravely at Five Forks, but with undiminished courage it drove back Crook on the north side of the Appomattox River only two days before Lee's surrender to Grant. stationed too far to the front to receive aid from the rest of the regiment, and hence, after receiving and repulsing several attacks, Boston fell, with a remnant of his squadron, into the hands of the Sixth Ohio Cavalry. Peremptory orders were fre
ttysburg. Merritt commanded a cavalry division in the Shenandoah Valley Campaign under Sheridan from August, 1864, to March, 1865, and in the final Richmond campaign the cavalry corps. After rendering service in the Spanish-American War, and commapointed lieutenant-general on February 28th. He met defeat at the hands of General James H. Wilson at Selma, Ala., in March, 1865, and surrendered to General Canby at Gainesville the following May. He remained in business in Tennessee until he diel, and from September, 1863, as major-general. He was severely wounded at Winchester, on September 19, 1864, and from March, 1865, until his surrender to General Meade at Farmville, was in command of all the cavalry of the Army of Northern Virginiaalry corps of the Military Division of the Mississippi. He took part in the battles of Franklin and Nashville, and in March, 1865, made his famous Selma raid. In twenty-eight days Wilson had captured 288 guns and 6280 prisoners, including Jefferso
sburg, General Lee, during the winter of 1864-65, required the engineer troops to rebuild Bevill's Bridge over the Appomattox River west of Petersburg, and to send a pontoon bridge to the Staunton River in Charlotte County. The engineer troops also prepared a map showing the routes to the different crossings of the Appomattox River, to be used whenever the army should be withdrawn from Richmond and Petersburg. This map has since been lithographed by the United States Government. In March, 1865, when the right of General Lee's position was seriously threatened, engineer troops strengthened the defenses at Hatcher's Run; but the main body of them served in the trenches in place of the infantry withdrawn to extend still further westward a line which was already more than thirty miles in length. The Confederate reverse at Five Forks, which cut off a part of Lee's army from Petersburg and forced it to retire to the north side of the Appomattox River, was closely followed by the l
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), On the Mississippi and adjacent waters (search)
ries at Guntersville and Beard's Bluff, Ala. Returning a few days later, she destroyed the entire town of Guntersville as punishment for hostile demonstrations against the gunboats. Thus these little vessels were kept busily at work till the close of the war. The General Sherman was commanded by Acting Master J. W. Morehead; her executive officer was G. L. McClung, by whose courtesy these fine pictures appear here. The vessels shown above, as they lay in the Tennessee near Bridgeport in March, 1865, are, from left to right, the General Sherman, No. 60; the General Thomas, No. 61; the General Grant, No. 62; and the General Burnside, No. 63; all named after the military leaders whose strategy had resulted in the recovery of Tennessee to the Union. Federal gunboats on the upper Tennessee Government steamboat used on the upper Tennessee in 1864-65 Squadron, as the Western Flotilla was now called, and had control of the river between Vicksburg and Port Hudson. Farragut once more
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Naval chronology 1861-1865: important naval engagements of the Civil war March, 1861-June, 1865 (search)
on Harbor. 60 of the officers and crew were lost. January 23-24, 1865. Confed. ironclads attempt descent of the James, and are driven back. January 26, 1865. Steamer Eclipse explodes on the Tennessee River, killing 140 persons. February, 1865. February 4, 1865. Lieut. Cushing with 4 boats and 50 men takes possession of All Saints Parish, on Little River, S. C., capturing a large amount of cotton. February 18, 1865. Charleston occupied by Union forces. March, 1865. March 4, 1865. U. S. transport steamer Thorne blown up by a torpedo in Cape Fear River. March 28-29, 1865. U. S. monitors Milwaukee and Osage sunk by torpedoes in Mobile Bay. April, 1865. April 8, 1865. Spanish Fort, Mobile, bombarded. The Confederates evacuate at night. April 12, 1865. Mobile occupied by Union forces. April 14, 1865. Anniversary of the capture of Fort Sumter celebrated, by imposing ceremonies at the fort, and replacing the fl
s pension. They have helped him to keep his papers straight. The basket on the man's arm suggests the charitable nature of the enterprise, the women in the doorway and on the porch indicate the feminine interest in it, and the ecclesiastical garb of one or two of the crowd suggests its religious nature. True heroes, some of these men who labored for the Sanitary Commission and Christian Commission to counteract the awful effects of the madness which sets men to killing one another. In March, 1865, General Terry had instituted a contraband Camp where the colored refugees were gathered, about a mile outside of New Berne, North Carolina. There they were maintained with army rations and some measure of official supervision. In this Camp an epidemic of smallpox broke out. The Camp was quarantined, but word came to the authorities that it was in bad shape. The dead were not being buried, the sick were not being cared for, and the food was being appropriated by the stronger. Vincent
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