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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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t into town, usually on horseback, to what is now City square, for the necessities they did not raise on their lands. No butchers', milk, fish, grocers', or coal teams made regular daily calls at those remote homesteads. How marked the change to-day! Solomon Phipps, the emigrant, died while his son, afterward the register, was in college. His grave can be shown in the old cemetery in Charlestown. It is in the front row, northwest of the gate, among his neighbors, Greene, Ryall, Peirce, Adams, Kettell, and Bunker, of which the most recent date is 1702. The hard-slate headstone, inscribed 1671, is of a texture likely to last for ages. Samuel Phipps, the son, was graduated at Harvard College in the class of 1671, the last class under President Chauncy, and the only one in twenty consecutive years to consist of more than ten members. The illustrious member of the class was Samuel Sewall, the judge, who was on the bench at the witchcraft trials, whose diary, long since in print,
est of such a sum as would be requisite to build. The recent establishment of factories at Milk Row will much tend to increase the scholars of that school, which, together with the ordinary growth of the town, will render the formation of a new district and the erection of a new schoolhouse, if not at this moment, surely within a short period, absolutely necessary. February 16, 1824, it was voted to refer to the selectmen at town meeting this petition of the inhabitants living from Mr. Joseph Adams', Senior, on Winter Hill down to Richard's tavern at the Neck. April 14, Messrs. Parker, Tufts, and Phipps were a committee appointed for contracting with some suitable person for erecting a schoolhouse on Winter Hill road. Jeremy Wilson was engaged to build a house on the Pound lot, thirty feet by twenty-four feet, at a cost of $500. At town meeting, May 3, 1824, the committee on new school building report that it will be completed in about twenty days. April 9, Milk Row School was
Index Adams, 79. Adams, Ashur, 45. Adams, Chester, 90, 99. Adams, Hannah, 18. Adams, Henry, 97, 100. Adams, Joseph, 99. Adams, Joseph, Esq., 74. Adams, Captain, Nathan, 41. Adams, Mrs., Sarah, 92. Adams, Zabdiel, 44. Alewife Bridge, 44, 45, 99. Alewife Brook, 5, 12, 17, 18, 22, 66. Alewife Brook School, 14, 16. Alger,——101. Alger, Israel, 67, 68. American First Class Book, 101. American Tube Works, 8. Andrews, Abraham, A. B., 68. 69, 70. Antigua, 23. Anti-slavAdams, Joseph, Esq., 74. Adams, Captain, Nathan, 41. Adams, Mrs., Sarah, 92. Adams, Zabdiel, 44. Alewife Bridge, 44, 45, 99. Alewife Brook, 5, 12, 17, 18, 22, 66. Alewife Brook School, 14, 16. Alger,——101. Alger, Israel, 67, 68. American First Class Book, 101. American Tube Works, 8. Andrews, Abraham, A. B., 68. 69, 70. Antigua, 23. Anti-slavery Society, 26. Arlington, Mass., 5, 14, 65. Atonement, The, 2. Augusta, Ga., 27, 34. Austin, Mrs., 83, 84. Austin, Ebenezer, 87. Austin, Elizabeth, 87. Austin, Elizabeth (White), 88. Austin, John, 84. Austin, Joseph, 88. Austin, Josiah, 84. Austin, Rebecca, 84, 88. Austin Street, Somerville, 99. Austin, Thankful (Benjamin), 87. Austin, Thomas, 84. Austin, William, 64. Auxiliary Educational League, 2. Babcock, Henry H., 10. Back Street, Charlestown, 84, 87. Balf
inal.) Petitioners for a Seperation of the Town of Charlestown. Names of Resident LandholdersHouses &cAcresTax Samuel TuftsHouse, Barn & out B.93107.06 John IrelandHouse, Barn & out B.31 1/229.18 Simeon CoppsHouse, Barn & out B.47 1/245.17 Samuel KentHouse, Barn & out B.5729.50 Thomas Rand jrHouse, Barn & out B.711.25 Jonathan KentHouse, Barn & out B.3.15 Hall J. KellyHouse Barn & out B.2441.70 Isaac TuftsHouse Barn & out B.10262.11 Bernard TuftsHouse, Barn & out B.8691.81 Joseph AdamsHouse, Barn & out B.10086.20 Asa TuftsHouse, Barn & out B.7471.85 John TuftsHouse, Barn & out B.6252.83 Amos HazletonHouse, Barn & out B.13 3/419.67 Names of Resident LandholdersHouses &cAcresTax Christopher HawkinsHouses &c7 David A. Sanborn1/2 Houses &c4227.12 Robert SanbornHouses &c610.71 Nathan TuftsHouse Barn &c2033.82 Alex. GeddesHouse & Factory20.46 William MunroeHouse & Shop12.12 Robert VinalHouse & Barns &c15.89 Phillip BonnerHouse & Barns &c4 C HarringtonHouse Bar
On the southerly side of Broadway, not far from Magoun square, are five large white-ash trees, which were set out by Joseph Adams some time previous to 1800. The largest of these is thirteen feet, ten inches in circumference, the smallest eight feet, six inches. Mr. Adams built his house, now better known as the Magoun house, on the top of Winter Hill in 1783. Of the orchard he planted there remain two apple trees. One of them has lately taken a new lease of life through the cultivation ofhavoc cutting down trees mentioned earlier in this paper. The logs which formed their barracks were afterwards used by Mr. Adams to build his barn. Mr. Adams built a fence with a red gate, an entrance to the field, the line of which the ash trees Mr. Adams built a fence with a red gate, an entrance to the field, the line of which the ash trees bordered. Miss Augusta F. Woodbury, one of the early pupils of the high school, in 1854 wrote a poem inspired by these trees, which may be of interest here:— The old red gate. By the old red gate neath the white-ash tree, In twilight's pensive
Index Adams, Charles, 78, 92, 96 97. Adams, Chester, 16, 17, 21, 23, 46, 48, 51, 52, 69. Adams, Joseph, 10, 86. Adams, Joseph, Jr., 13. Adams, Samuel, 11. Agassiz, Louis, 8. Albion Street, 53, 85. Alewife Brook, 47. Allen, Alfred, 49, 71, 72, 73, 74, 77, 78, 92, 99. Allen, Amos F., 77. Allen, Amos S., 79, 83. Allen, Henry C., 48. Alphabetical Cards, 98. American Anti-Slavery Society, 29. American Arithmetic, Robinson, 25. American First Class Book, 25, 98. Ames, Adams, Joseph, Jr., 13. Adams, Samuel, 11. Agassiz, Louis, 8. Albion Street, 53, 85. Alewife Brook, 47. Allen, Alfred, 49, 71, 72, 73, 74, 77, 78, 92, 99. Allen, Amos F., 77. Allen, Amos S., 79, 83. Allen, Henry C., 48. Alphabetical Cards, 98. American Anti-Slavery Society, 29. American Arithmetic, Robinson, 25. American First Class Book, 25, 98. Ames, D., 15. Ames, Philander, 49, 92. Andrews, Hannah, 72. Angier, D., 12. Angier, Ellen P 53. Anne Adams Tufts Chapter, D. A. R., 86. Appalachian Club, 36. Arlington, Mass., 7. Arnold Arboretum, 1, 8. Austin, Hannah S., 92, 96, 99. Austin, N., 13. Austin Street, 20, 22, 93. Ayer, John F., 53. Babcock, A., 13. Bacon, Moses, 82. Bacon, William H., 96. Bagnall, William R., 77, 78, 83. Bailey's Algebra, 98. Baker, , 52. Baker, Amos P., 67 Baker, Henry, 59. Banks Street,
Historic leaves, volume 6, April, 1907 - January, 1908, Original English inhabitants and early settlers in Somerville.—(Ii.) (search)
he only one of his nine children who remained in Somerville. He married Rebecca, daughter of Joseph Adams. Three of the children of Samuel remained in Somerville: Sarah and Rebecca, who married successively Nathaniel Hawkins, and Lucy, who married Joseph Adams. Lucy's descendants are the only posterity of John Kent now in this city-five persons. John Fosket, 1677, married a daughter of Robline, and in Polly's Swamp. Two of the descendants of Peleg Stearns are now in Somerville. Joseph Adams, 1770, was of the fifth generation of the John Adams family, of Cambridge, arid the fourth Jo Hill, in what is now known as the Magoun House; and it is still occupied by descendants. Major Joseph Adams married, first, Lucy, daughter of Samuel Kent, and second, Sarah, daughter of Peter Tufts.of Somerville. Rebecca Cutter, daughter of William, was of the third generation, and married Joseph Adams (the second Joseph), of Cambridge. The descendants of Richard Cutter now living in this ci
Index Adams, Henry, 7. Adams, John, 52. Adams, Joseph, 50, 52, 53. Adams, Major, Joseph, 52. Adams, Rebecca, 50. Adams, Sanford, 6, 14. Alewife Brook, 26, 53. Allen, Alfred, 55. Allen, Benjamin F., 12. Allen, Hiram, 11, 34. Allen, Hiram, Jr., 11. Allen, Lucy, 11. Allen, Margaret, 11. Alsop's Farm, 56, 57. Alston Street, 9. American Flag, The First, 81. American Navy, The, 84. Amesbury, Mass., 1. Anderson, 56. Andersonville Prison, 22. Andrew, Governor, 43. AAdams, Major, Joseph, 52. Adams, Rebecca, 50. Adams, Sanford, 6, 14. Alewife Brook, 26, 53. Allen, Alfred, 55. Allen, Benjamin F., 12. Allen, Hiram, 11, 34. Allen, Hiram, Jr., 11. Allen, Lucy, 11. Allen, Margaret, 11. Alsop's Farm, 56, 57. Alston Street, 9. American Flag, The First, 81. American Navy, The, 84. Amesbury, Mass., 1. Anderson, 56. Andersonville Prison, 22. Andrew, Governor, 43. Antietam Bridge, 20. Arlington, D. C., 18. Arlington, Mass., 26. Armory, The, 81. Army of the Potomac, 44, 56. Arnold, J. Frank, 8. Arnold, Leonard, 8, 10. Arnold, William J., 56. Associated Charities, 75. Austin, Richard, 29. Avery, Mathew, 30. Ayer, John F., 74, 76. Ayer, William, 28. Bachelder, Abigail, 29. Bachelder, William, 29. Baker, Rev., Charles, 39. Baker, William, 30. Baker, William A., 18. Baltimore, Md., 77. Banks, Governor, 38. Banks, Hon. N. P., Jr., 42.
fts Kidder attended the Milk Row School at the time it was burned. It has come to us through a reliable source that this old building was a double decker, that is, not a two-story structure, but with a gallery running around on three sides of the schoolroom, thus affording seating capacity for gatherings of all kinds. The report of 1819 says: The district commences in Cambridge road, sweeps around the Cambridge line, runs across Milk Row by Isaac Tufts' to Winter Hill, by the house of Joseph Adams, Esq., to Mystic River, and down to the cluster of houses near the entrance of 3 Pole Lane, and over to the place of beginning. It contains sixty-one families and 106 children, from four to fourteen, about one-third of whom are under seven years of age. The following May it was voted that the new Milk Row School be erected where the former one stood. Isaac Tufts and James K. Frothingham were made a building committee, and it was decided to build of wood. The house was completed by O
r £ 130. Mr. Austin by deed dated September 6, 1801, conveyed the land to Joseph Adams for $666.67, and called it an eleven-acre lot, and bounded it southerly on aomes to the rangeway just mentioned. Thus it became a part of the estate of Joseph Adams, on another part of which estate Mr. Sargent now lives. I think Mr. Sargent married a descendant of this Mr. Adams. Joseph Adams died in 1824, leaving a will which was dated in 1823. In that will he gives to his sons, Joseph and Samuel,Joseph Adams died in 1824, leaving a will which was dated in 1823. In that will he gives to his sons, Joseph and Samuel, and to his grandchildren, William Frost, Edmund Frost, and Lucy Frost, that lot of land and the buildings on it where my son Joseph lives, containing about eleven autter a parcel of 2 acres, 1 quarter, and 36 poles, bounded northeasterly on Joseph Adams; easterly on Craigie's Road; southeasterly on a rangeway, and southwesterly acres bounded westerly on Craigie's Road; northwesterly and northeasterly on Joseph Adams; and southeasterly on a rangeway (Walnut Street) for $250.25. Mr. Wyman by d
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