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his business! Care after care, blunder after blunder, trick upon trick. I am well-nigh tired of the world, and, were it not for you, would be fully so. That affair of Leesburg on Monday last was a horrible butchery. The men fought nobly, but were penned up by a vastly superior force in a place where they had no retreat. The whole thing took place some forty miles from here, without my orders or knowledge. It was entirely unauthorized by me, and I am in no manner responsible for it. Col. Baker, who was killed, was in command, and violated all military rules and precautions. Instead of meeting the enemy with double their force and a good ferry behind him, he was outnumbered three to one and had no means of retreat. Cogswell is a prisoner; he behaved very handsomely. Raymond Lee is also taken. I found things in great confusion when I arrived there. In a very short time order and confidence were restored. During the night I withdrew everything and everybody to this side of th
e, and our troops appear to be advancing there under Baker. The left, under Gorman, has advanced its skirmishe 21, 1861, 6.45 P. M. To Maj.-Gen. McClellan: Col Baker has been killed at the head of his brigade. I go toig.-Gen. Gen. Stone was evidently misinformed, as Col. Baker had only one battalion of his brigade with him. redeem. We have lost some of our best commanders — Baker dead, Coggswell a prisoner or secreted. The wounded made cautiously. All was reported going well up to Baker's death, but in the confusion following that the rigStone telegraphs for whole division immediately. Col. Baker is killed, and some trouble exists on his right. essenger again returned with the information that Col. Baker would soon arrive with his brigade and take commaast two he fell back to the bluff, where he found Col. Baker, who directed him to take the right of the positie left of our line; shortly after he learned that Col. Baker had been killed. Col. Coggswell then assumed com
552, Army corps, formation, 222, 342. Army organization : infantry, 108 ; artillery, 108 ; cavalry, 109 ; engineers, 110: staff, 110-112. Aspinwall, W. H., 451, 655. Astor. Jr., Col. J. J., 123. 251. Averill, Gen. W. W., at Washington, 222. In Peninsula, 239 ; Yorktown, 260 ; Williamsburg, 339 ; Malvern. 438; White Oak Swamp, 494. In Maryland campaign, 647, 659. Ayres, Capt., 301, 430. Babcock, Lieut. O. E., 124. Bache, Prof., 87, 125, 177, 280. Bailey, Col. G., 380. Baker, Col., 81 ; at Ball's Bluff, 171, 183-187, death 185, 190. Ball's Bluff, Va., battle of, 181-190. Balt. and O. R. R., 50, 102, 190-192. Banks, Gen. N., in Shenandoah Valley, 73, 74, 76, 78, 79, 81, 88, 94, 106, 146, 240, 241, 270, 294, 350, 368 ; Ball's Bluff, 183-188; Pope's campaign, 509 ; South Mountain, 574, 579; Washington, ‘62, 551, 622. Barber's Cross-roads, Va., 647. Barhamsville, Va. 319, 320, 324, 334. Barker, Capt., 320, 321. Barlow, Col., 596, 597. Barnard, Gen. J.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Lee's final and full report of the Pennsylvania campaign and battle of Gettysburg. (search)
Gap and ordered Early to move up the Valley by Strasburg and New Market. He encamped near Madison Courthouse on the 29th July. The enemy massed his army in the vicinity of Warrenton, and in the night of the 31st July his cavalry, with a large supporting force of infantry, crossed the Rappahannock at Rappahannock Station and Kelley's Ford. The next day they advanced towards Brandy Station, their progress being gallantly resisted by General Stuart, with Hampton's brigade, commanded by Colonel Baker, who fell back gradually to our lines about two miles south of Brandy. Our infantry skirmishers advanced and drove the enemy beyond Brandy Station. It was now determined to place the army in a position to enable it more readily to oppose the enemy should he attempt to move southward, that near Culpeper Courthouse being one that he could easily avoid. Longstreet and Hill were put in motion on the 3d August, leaving the cavalry at Culpeper. Ewell had been previously ordered from Madi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General J. E. B. Stuart's report of operations after Gettysburg. (search)
ner by the other brigades (Fitz. Lee's, Hampton's, now commanded by Baker, and W. H. F. Lee's, commanded by Chambliss), and the Stuart Horse e cavalry on the left consisted now of Fitz. Lee's, W. H. F. Lee's, Baker's and Roberts' brigades, the latter being a mere handful. On thet dark, Fitz. Lee's brigade holding the line of Longstreet's corps, Baker's, of Hill's corps, and the remainder of Ewell's corps. A pontoon, bringing up the rear on that route by 8 A. M. on the 14th. To Baker's (late Hampton's) brigade was assigned the duty of protecting the f July, the enemy made a demonstration on Hedgesville, forcing back Baker's brigade. Desultory skirmishing was kept up on the front for seveese will be found in the reports of Brigadier-General Jones and Colonel Baker. It soon became apparent that the enemy was moving upon our n for his advance guard, through Front Royal and Chester Gap, while Baker's brigade was ordered to bring up the rear of Ewell's corps, which
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of Major-General C. L. Stevenson from the beginning of the Dalton-Atlanta campaign to May 30, 1864. (search)
I put my command in position on the right of General Stewart, and very soon thereafter the enemy assaulted him in force. A small portion of my left brigade (Brown's) was engaged, and the men behaved with their usual spirit until relieved. The enemy kept up a heavy fire of skirmishers and artillery upon my front line — Brown and Pettus — and inflicted considerable loss; but my skirmishers behaved well, and were only driven back upon portions of the line. On the 28th, I was informed by General Baker that the enemy had succeeded in planting a battery a short distance in front of his works, and that, having no long range guns, he could not drive them off. I sent him a regiment of rifles from Cumming's brigade, which soon dislodged the enemy. The following statement will show my losses during the whole movement:  Killed.Wounded.Missing. Brown's brigade,3917310 Cumming's brigade,1989270 Reynold's brigade,33126190 Pettus' brigade,3017761    121565531 It affords me pleasure
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of General J. E. B. Stuart of cavalry operations on First Maryland campaign, from August 30th to September 18th, 1862. (search)
e through General D. H. Hill, to the Commanding General. In the engagemts at the gap in the Catoctin and near Middletown, the Jeff. Davis Legion and First North Carolina cavalry, respectively under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Martin and Colonel Baker, conducted themselves with the utmost gallantry, and sustained a hot fire of artillery and musketry without flinching or confusion in the ranks. Captain Siler, a gallant officer of the First North Carolina cavalry, had his leg broken during the engagement. The enemy soon appeared in force crossing the mountain, and a spirited engagement took place, both of artillery and sharpshooters, the First North Carolina, Colonel Baker, holding the rear and acting with conspicuous gallantry. This lasted for some time, when, having held the enemy in check sufficiently long to accomplish my object, I withdrew slowly toward the gap in the South mountain, having given General D. H. Hill ample time to occupy that gap with his troops, and still
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Gettysburg campaign. (search)
to ask support from General Lee, but he had replied my brigade was nearest and should support Chambliss' brigade. Seeing that support was essential, I sent to Colonel Baker, ordering him to send two regiments to protect Colonel Chambliss, who had made a charge — I know not by whose orders — and whoa was falling back before a large force of the enemy. The First North Carolina and the Jeff. Davis legion were sent by Colonel Baker, and these two regiments drove back the enemy, but in their eagerness they followed him too far and encountered his reserve in heavy force. Seeing the state of affairs at this juncture, I rode rapidly to the front to take charge owas endeavoring to extricate the First North Carolina and the Jeff. Davis legion, I was wounded, and had to leave the field, after turning over the command to Colonel Baker. The charge of my brigade has been recently explained to me as having been ordered by Captain Barker, Assistant Adjutant-General, who supposed that it was i
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Gettysburg campaign--full report of General J. E. B. Stuart. (search)
taken at nightfall. In this order two brigades of cavalry (Baker's and Hampton's) were ordered to move, as heretofore statedhe other brigades (Fitz. Lee's, Hampton's, now commanded by Baker, and W. H. F. Lee's, commanded by Chambliss) and the Stuarty on the left consisted now of Fitz. Lee's, W. H. F. Lee's, Baker's, and Robertson's brigades — the latter being a mere handfFitz. Lee's brigade holding the line of Longstreet's corps, Baker's of Hill's corps, and the remainder of Ewell's corps. Anging up the rear on that route by 8 A. M. on the 14th. To Baker's (late Hampton's) brigade was assigned the duty of picketithe enemy made a demonstration on Hedgesville, forcing back Baker's brigade. Desultory skirmishing was kept up on that front be found in the reports of Brigadier-General Jones and Colonel Baker. It soon became apparent that the enemy was moving us advance guard through Front Royall and Chester gap, while Baker's brigade was ordered to bring up the rear of Ewell's corps
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sherman's Meridian expedition and Sooy Smith's raid to West point. (search)
timated at twenty-six thousand (26,000) effectives. The skirmishing on this day was handsomely done, as the large force of the enemy was visible to almost every member of the Confederate States command. An incident near the old battlefield of Baker's creek is worthy of being recorded. The enemy, deployed, was moving forward. Adams' brigade, dismounted, was hotly contesting their advance through a swamp. While thus engaged, a Federal brigade of cavalry came charging down on their flank anand check the advancing Federals. It was a choice command, fearlessly led, and did the work assigned it, but with the loss of the noble leader and many of his followers. The charge saved Adams' brigade, which was retired, mounted and moved over Baker's creek. Griffith's Arkansas regiment was thrown into the woods near the crossing, thus permitting the two companies to sweep over the bridge when gradually pressed back by the superior numbers engaging them, and punishing the Federals for follo
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