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morning of December 1, 1864, I received orders to go to Franklin, Tennessee, and make arrangements for the wounded of General Bate's division. I did so, taking with me my hospital steward, a detail of ten men, and two wagons. Two of the firstving conical ball often produced a clean-cut wound. On December 25, 1864, my associates and myself, with the wounded of Bate's division, were all moved to Nashville, and placed in the large building on South College Street, built in the summer of anooga. Having accompanied my regiment on its advance movement, about fifteen days after the battle, I was ordered by General Bate to go to the field-hospitals and make a thorough inspection of the condition of the wounded men of his command. I do hs were convalescent or able for duty. During the Dalton-Atlanta campaign of 1864, I was sent at different times by General Bate to make unofficial inspections of the wounded of his command at Catoosa Springs, Griffin, and Marietta, Georgia. At e
morning of December 1, 1864, I received orders to go to Franklin, Tennessee, and make arrangements for the wounded of General Bate's division. I did so, taking with me my hospital steward, a detail of ten men, and two wagons. Two of the firstving conical ball often produced a clean-cut wound. On December 25, 1864, my associates and myself, with the wounded of Bate's division, were all moved to Nashville, and placed in the large building on South College Street, built in the summer of anooga. Having accompanied my regiment on its advance movement, about fifteen days after the battle, I was ordered by General Bate to go to the field-hospitals and make a thorough inspection of the condition of the wounded men of his command. I do hs were convalescent or able for duty. During the Dalton-Atlanta campaign of 1864, I was sent at different times by General Bate to make unofficial inspections of the wounded of his command at Catoosa Springs, Griffin, and Marietta, Georgia. At e
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Hardee and the Military operations around Atlanta. (search)
e o'clock. My troops were formed as follows: Bate's division on the right; Walker's in the centreas necessarily slow. Expecting but not hearing Bate's guns, I ordered Maney and Cleburne (whose div shifted and ordered forward to co-operate with Bate's flanking movement; Cleburne's division, hitheom the rear. Meanwhile the right divisions — Bate and Walker — unexpectedly encountered the Sixted accidentally in the position where Walker and Bate struck it. This corps was fresh, and had only tion (Sherman's Memoirs, volume II, page 74). Bate and Walker attacked this strong and fresh force position of the Sixteenth corps, by preventing Bate and Walker from closing in upon McPherson's reathe command of General Maney). The divisions of Bate and Walker falling upon Dodge's column, and the in speaking of the second attack of Walker and Bate on the Sixteenth corps: It seemed to us tha I recollect distinctly seeing Cleburne, Maney, Bate and Walker during the day. Had General Hardee g[4 more...]<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Johnsonville. (search)
rect any errors in my statement. I will not attempt a description in detail of this brilliant episode, but confine myself to the especial parts in which I was engaged. On the 29th of October, 1864, at daylight, I found myself Captain of a cavalry company attached to General H. B. Lyon's brigade, then at Fort Heiman, on the west bank of the Tennessee river. Until this time I had been continuously employed in the artillery service under General Breckinridge, then consecutively under Generals Bate, Cheatham, Helm, Preston and Lewis, with sixty days service in heavy artillery during the siege of Vicksburg. My battery was familiarly known as the First Kentucky or Cobb's battery. General H. B. Lyon was its original commander, Major Cobb, of Paducah, succeeding him, whilst I in turn became his successor. On the morning previously mentioned I was with General Lyon's brigade of cavalry concealed on the bank of the Tennessee; a portion of my command had been detailed to assist in wo
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 19: battle of Chickamauga (search)
Manigault3 Hill, D. H.CleburneWood, Polk, Deshler3 BreckenridgeHelm, Adams, Stovall4 WalkerGistColquitt, Ector, Wilson 2 LiddellGovan, Walthall2 BucknerStewartBate, Brown, Clayton 4 PrestonGracie, Trigg, Kelly3 Army of Tenn., Gen. Bragg, Sept. 19--20, 1863 corpsDIVISIONSBRIGADESBATTERIES Res. Div.JohnsonGregg, McNair,o lines deep and two brigades front, with the aid of Wood's brigade of Cleburne's division on its right. The four brigades, Brown and Wood followed by Clayton and Bate, advanced together. The enemy were driven by this charge some 200 yards and lost a battery of guns, but here the impulse was gone and the advance stopped. Meanwhon9942680605Not giv. Total2079162541,3775,000 Walker Liddell Govan73502283858Not giv. Walthall61531196788Not giv. Total1341,0334791,6463,175 Buckner Stewart Bate63530116041,316 Brown5042744811,412 Clayton86518156191,446 Total1991,475301,7044,174 Buckner Preston Gracie9057626682128 Trigg4623142811536 Kelly662413310113
t-bolt. (Machinery.) A bolt barbed or jagged at its butt or tang, to retain it within an object cast or solidified about it. Batch. A lot of prepared materials or articles, suitable in quantity for once charging a pot, furnace, or oven. 1. (Glass.) The frit of a glass-maker compounded and sifted for use, ready for the glass-pot or crucible. 2. A lot of dough or unbaked loaves. 3. (Mining.) A certain quantity of ore sent from a mine to the surface by a couple of men. Bate. (Leather.) The alkaline solution employed in the preparation of hides, after liming and before tanning, to remove or neutralize the lime. See bating. Ba-teau. (Nautical.) a. A flat-bottom boat, used in navigation and propelled by oars or by poles. b. A ponton of a floating bridge. Bath. 1. A vessel in which the whole or a part of the person may be washed or bathed. 2. A house or place where such conveniences are provided. 3. A tank containing a liquid for galvan<
ular line, the pattern being worked in the net, and the plait-thread surrounding the flowers. Me-com′e-ter. (Surgical.) A graduated instrument used at the Hospice de Maternite in Paris, to measure new-born infants. Med′al. An ancient or a memorial coin. Me-dal′lic En-grav′ing. In this beautiful art the direction and distance of the lines are so modified as to give the appearance of a figure or object in relief. It is executed by machinery. The machines of M. Collas and Mr. Bate, as well as those of Asa Spencer, Mr. Froude, and Mr. Saxon, are all improvements upon an apparatus described in a French work, the Manuel de Tourneur, about 1814. This machine will give a good general idea of the construction of these machines, and its operation is as follows: — The medal and the copper on which the medal is to be engraved are fixed on two sliding plates at right angles to each other, and so connected that when the plate on which the metal is fixed is raised ver
ssel of metal, to contain the cream to be iced. In the intervening space is a mixture of pounded ice and salt, or of sulphate of soda and hydrochloric acid. The contents of the inner vessel are agitated by a handle and the frozen cream is occasionally scraped down. Sab′re-tasche. A leathern pocket suspended on the left side from the sword-belt of a cavalry officer. Saccha-rom′e-ter. A hydrometer graduated to indicate the amount of sugar in worts and other saccharine solutions. Bate's is generally used in England. It consists of a brass ball with a cylindrical stem, graduated into 30 parts, each corresponding to 1/1000 of the specific gravity of water, the relative length of the divisions being such as to compensate for the increased volume of the submerged portion as it sinks in the liquid. Tables are prepared, showing the percentage of sugar contained in worts of specific gravities corresponding to the indications of the scale. The optical saccharometer is a for
. Words cannot describe the crushing suspense of the first five minutes of the charge. Newton's lines were so thin they looked, in some places, like skirmish deployments. They opened, and the section of artillery in position opened, but the momentum of the dust-colored phalanxes was hatefully steady. Their colors snapped saucily and streamed on steadily. Soon every musket in Newton's division was blazing; for at the instant Walker's rebel division attacked Blake's and Kimball's brigades, Bate's rebel division appeared on the flank and confronted Bradley's brigade, aiming for the bridge on Peach-tree creek. They seemed to spring from the ground, and to continue springing. A stream of non-combatants commenced flowing across the bridge. Pack-mules, imprudently taken close to our lines by fortuitous darkies, came scampering back, the latter turned tawny-brown with fright and reeking with perspiration. Ambulances tumbled over the bridge in demoralized columns. A few armed stragg
ng from both his flanks to the river. Artillery was opened on him from several points on the line, without eliciting any response. The block-house at the railroad crossing of Overall's creek, five miles north of Murfreesboroa, was attacked by Bate's division of Cheatham's corps, on the fourth, but held out until assistance reached it from the garrison at Murfreesboroa. The enemy used artillery to reduce the block-house, but although seventy-four shots were fired at it, no material injury was done. General Milroy coming up with three regiments of infantry, four companies of the Thirteenth Indiana cavalry, and a section of artillery, attacked the enemy and drove him off. During the fifth, sixth and seventh, Bate?? division, reinforced by a division from Lee?? and two thousand five hundred of Forrest's cavalry, demonstrated heavily against Fortress Rosecrans, at Murfreesboroa, garrisoned by about eight thousand men, under command of General Rousseau. The enemy showing an unwilling
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