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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 29, 1862., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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ness to withdraw Cockrell if so ordered. The withdrawal was peremptorily ordered and executed on April 17th. At the same time the Sixth Mississippi, First Confederate battalion, and one field battery, were sent from Jackson to reinforce Grand Gulf, and Green's brigade from Vicksburg. During this period considerable excitement was caused by the raft obstruction of the Yazoo at Snyder's Mill giving way and opening the channel. Further up the river, near Greenwood, the indefatigable Capt. I. N. Brown had been constructing a little fleet of cotton clad gunboats, to aid in the defense of the Yazoo line. The raft was soon replaced, and gradually fear of a Federal attack in that quarter was allayed. On the night of April 22d, six more gunboats and a lot of barges ran past Vicksburg to New Carthage. While these ominous preparations were being made, Confederate forces in the interior of the State were held back from the threatened points by General Grierson's raid from La Grange, Te
sending an expedition against Canton, the troops started back to Vicksburg. On the 21st Sherman sent word to Grant that he had promised 200 barrels of flour and 20,000 pounds of pork, or equivalents, to the inhabitants, as there were about 800 women and children who would perish unless they received some relief. Grant promptly honored the requisition. On July 13th a Federal expedition under General Herron arrived at Yazoo City in transports, accompanied by a gunboat flotilla. Commander Isaac N. Brown was there, with the few boats that he had improvised, and a small garrison in the fortifications. He repulsed the gunboats at first, and blew up the Federal ironclad De Kalb, with thirteen guns, by a torpedo explosion, but was forced to burn his own flotilla and evacuate the position. At Natchez on the same day, Brigadier-General Ransom landed and occupied the town, whence he made expeditions to destroy military property at Liberty, and a cotton factory and railroad transportation
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.12 (search)
eafening. Loud explosions shook the city to its foundation. Shot and shell went hissing and tearing through the trees and walls, scattering fragments far and wide in their terrible flight. Men, women and children rushed into the streets; and amid the crash of falling houses, left the city for the country for safety. Again, on July 15th occurred one of the most brilliant naval feats recorded in the annals of naval warfare. The Confederate iron-clad gunboat Arkansas, commanded by Capt. Isaac N. Brown, ran out of the mouth of the Yazoo river and single-handed attacked the whole Federal fleet, including Farragut's squadron of eight vessels and Admiral Davies' gunboat fleet of twelve vessels, nearly every one of which carried heavier metal. The very audacity of the exploit confounded the fleet. The Arkansas fought and butted its way through all the vessels under one of the most concentrated cannonades ever centered on a single vessel, and drew up at the wharf at Vicksburg under pro
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Building and Commissioning of the Arkansas. (search)
e to Brig. Gen. M. L. Smith, but the command of the post soon after passed to Major General Earl Van Dorn. From the navy department orders were sent to First Lieut Isaac N. Brown, C. S. N., to assume command of the Arkansas and finish the vessel without regard to expenditure of men or money. It was provided by President Davis thheat of the season. On June 20, 1862, the Confederate steamer Arkansas, having been completed according to the material at the disposal of her commander, Isaac N. Brown, left Yazoo City and descended the Yazoo River to Liverpool Landing, where an earthwork and raft of logs were in position to prevent the Federal fleet from ascending the river. The officers of the Arkansas were: Lieut. I. N. Brown, commanding; First Lieut. Henry K. Stevens, executive officer; Lieuts. John Grimball, A. D. Wharton, G. W. Read, Alphonse Barbot, George W. Gift; Surgeon H. W. M. Washington; Assistant Surgeon Charles M. Morfit; Assistant Paymaster Richard Taylor; First Assi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Second action of the Arkansas. (search)
t regains its proper element, will be one of the chief bulwarks of national defence, and that it is entitled to a high place in the confidence and affection of the country. Congress also passed the following joint resolution of thanks to Lieut. I. N. Brown and all under his command: Resolved, by the Congress of the Confederate States of America, that the thanks of Congress are hereby cordially tendered to Lieut. Isaac N. Brown, and all under his command, for their signal exhibition of skilt resolution of thanks to Lieut. I. N. Brown and all under his command: Resolved, by the Congress of the Confederate States of America, that the thanks of Congress are hereby cordially tendered to Lieut. Isaac N. Brown, and all under his command, for their signal exhibition of skill and gallantry on the 15th day of July last, on the Mississippi River, near Vicksburg, in the brilliant and successful engagement of the sloop of war Arkansas with the enemy's fleet. Approved October 2, 1862.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Fourth action of the Arkansas. (search)
with a disabled engine. * * * In about half an hour after the firing had begun (the upper fleet engaging the land batteries) the large and formidable iron-clad ram, the Essex emerged from the smoke above and made directly for the Arkansas. Commander Brown received the attack at anchor, with a crew sufficient to work two guns, but with the aid of his officers he was able to man all the guns which could be brought to bear. When the muzzles of the guns were nearly touching each other, the broadw close to us, evidently determined to ram us. The guns had been fired and were now empty and inboard. Somehow we got them loaded and run out; and by the time she commenced to round to, the columbiads were ready, as also the broadside guns. Captain Brown adopted the plan of turning his head to her also, and thus received her blow glancing. She came into us at an enormous speed, probably fifteen miles an hour. * * * Her blow, though glancing was a heavy one; the prow or beak making a hole in
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The end of the Arkansas. (search)
The end of the Arkansas. While his vessel was repairing damages under the bluff at Vicksburg, Lieutenant, now Commander, Isaac N. Brown now obtained leave of absence, and was soon after taken down with fever at Grenada, Miss. While thus disabled, he learned from his executive office, Lieut. H. K. Stevens, left in command, that peremptory orders had been sent him by Gen. Van Dorn to co-operate with Gen. Breckinridge in the attack on Baton Rouge. Commander Brown sent positive orders to Lieut. Stevens not to move his vessel until he could join it, as the Arkansas was not ready for action. * * Lieut. Stevens referred the matter for his decision to Capt.nfederate States navy in the West. Ignorant or regardless of the condition of the Arkansas, Capt. Lynch ordered Lieut. Stevens to disobey the instructions of commander Brown and comply with the request of Van Dorn. It this way the Arkansas was placed under the command of Lieut. Stevens, with orders to run 300 miles against time.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The honor roll of the University of Virginia, from the times-dispatch, December 3, 1905. (search)
a., Petersburg, 1865. Broadus, E. L., Va., 186-. Brockenborough, A. A. G., Va., Gettysburg, Pa., 1863. Bronaugh, W. N., Maj., Va., Richmond, Va., 1862. Brown, J. T., Col., Va., Wilderness, Va., 1864. Brown, A. J., Col., Tenn., 1864. Brown, S. W., Va., Staunton, Va., 1864. Buckner, T. R., Lt., Va., Spotsylvania,Brown, A. J., Col., Tenn., 1864. Brown, S. W., Va., Staunton, Va., 1864. Buckner, T. R., Lt., Va., Spotsylvania, C. H., 1864. Buford, J. W., Va., Gettysburg, Pa., 1864. Buist, E. S., Surg., S. C., Hilton Head, S. C., 1864. Burgess, S. N., Surg., S. C., Statesburg, S. C., 1861. Burkhalter, J. E., Surg., Ft. Royal, S. C., 1862. Butler, E. G. W., Maj., La. Belmont, 186-. Butler, C. A., Capt., Fla., Seven Pines, Va., 1862. BBrown, S. W., Va., Staunton, Va., 1864. Buckner, T. R., Lt., Va., Spotsylvania, C. H., 1864. Buford, J. W., Va., Gettysburg, Pa., 1864. Buist, E. S., Surg., S. C., Hilton Head, S. C., 1864. Burgess, S. N., Surg., S. C., Statesburg, S. C., 1861. Burkhalter, J. E., Surg., Ft. Royal, S. C., 1862. Butler, E. G. W., Maj., La. Belmont, 186-. Butler, C. A., Capt., Fla., Seven Pines, Va., 1862. Butler, W. B., Capt.. Fla., Chancellorsville, Va., 1863. Butt, J. W., Lt., Va., Richmond, Va., 1862. Cabell, J. C., Lt., Va., Richmond, Va., 1863. Cardwell, J. R., Va., Augusta, Ga., 1864. Carr, J. G., Lt., Va., Dry Creek, Va., 1863. Carr, W. C., Lt., Va., Seven Pines, Va., 1863. Carr, J. G., Va. Carrington, W.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.33 (search)
was repulsed, and my brigade taking a position in a ravine covered their retreat. I at once deployed a line of skirmishers and held this position until 12:35 P. M., when in obedience to orders from General Gibbon, I withdrew to the second line of intrenchments. Colonel John C. Tidball, Chief Artillery, Hancock's corps, page 510 of Records, says: May 18th moved from Harris' house to the deserted house, and Roder, Ames and Ricketts to Landrum's. Sent Edgell's battery to Colonel Tompkins. Brown, Roder and Ames, in the first line, silenced rebel battery; 12 M. still in position. Clark and Ricketts moved down to works on extreme right. Edgell already there with Birneys's division. General G. K. Warren, page 542 of Records, says: May 18, 1864, whole army had moved off to our right to make an assault on the enemy, and I commenced to cannonade at daylight with 26 guns, as a diversion. This occasioned a brisk artillery duel between myself and Hill's Corps. Our forces found the en
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
, 145 Balloons, used in C. S. Army 32 Bartlett, hero, Gen. W. F., 385 Battine, Capt. Cecil, 79; his incorrect estimates of Confederate and Federal forces and losses 80 Baumgarten J. B., Engraver, 188 Beall, John Yates, hero and martyr, 17 Bennett, Col. R. T., admirable addresses of, 665 Bethesda Church, battle of, 57 Billmyer Capt. J. M., 192 Bishop, Capt. C. R., 297 Bouldin, Capt. E. E., 69 Boonsboro, Md., battle of, 278 Bristow station battle of, 250 Brown comander I. N. 11, Capt. J. Thompson, 104; Rev. Wm. D. D., 260, 290 Bull, Col. G. A. killed 223 Burrows D. D., Rev. J. L., 221, 290 Burton, Bishop L. W., 194 Bryan, Capt. J. R., perils of, 32 Cameron, Ex-Gov. W. E., 298 Carman Gen. E. A., 98 Carter's Battery, 233 Carter, Col. T. H. 288; Capt. Wm. Page, Poem by, 288 Chancellorsville, battle of 119 Chappell, P. W. killed, 233 Chisholm's J. J. Manual of Surgery, 174 Christian, Col. C. B., 57 Clay, James W
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