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Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery., First joint debate, at Ottawa, August 21, 1858. (search)
ted the Compromise measures of 1850 as the basis of a proper and just solution of this slavery question in all its forms. Clay was the great leader, with Webster on his right and Cass on his left, and sustained by the patriots in the Whig and Democru want to hear something that don't hurt. Now, having spoken of the Dred Scott decision, one more word and I am done. Henry Clay, my beau ideal of a statesman, the man for whom I fought all my humble life-Henry Clay once said of a class of men who Clay once said of a class of men who would repress all tendencies to liberty and ultimate emancipation, that they must, if they would do this, go back to the era of our Independence, and muzzle the cannon which thunders its annual joyous return ; they must blow out the moral lights arou, doing that very thing in this community, when he says that the negro has nothing in the Declaration of Independence. Henry Clay plainly understood the contrary. Judge Douglas is going back to the era of our Revolution, and to the extent of his ab
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery., Second joint debate, at Freeport, August 27, 1858. (search)
Congress abolish slavery in the District of Columbia, and, in the language of Henry Clay, sweep from our Capital that foul blot upon our nation. In regard to the fthey were brought in. Lincoln went to work to dissolve the old line Whig party. Clay was dead, and although the sod was not yet green on his grave, this man undertook to bring into disrepute those great Compromise measures of 1850, with which Clay and Webster were identified. Up to 1854 the old Whig party and the Democratic partce and harmony of the Union. The Compromise measures of 1850 were introduced by Clay, were defended by Webster, and supported by Cass, and were approved by Fillmore,ts last National Convention at Baltimore indorsed and approved these measures of Clay, and so did the National Convention of the Democratic party held that same year.ight to decide the slavery question for themselves. In 1854, after the death of Clay and Webster, Mr. Lincoln, on the part of the Whigs, undertook to, Abolitionize t
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery., Third joint debate, at Jonesboro, September 15, 1858. (search)
he leaders of the great Democratic party to postpone, for the time being, their particular disputes, and unite first to save the Union before they should quarrel as to the mode in which it was to be governed. During the Congress of 1849--1850, Henry Clay was the leader of the Union men, supported by Cass and Webster, and the leaders of the Democracy and the leaders of the Whigs, in opposition to Northern Abolitionists or Southern Disunionists. That great contest of 1850 resulted in the establis the rule of action by which the Democracy would be governed. The Presidential election of 1852 was fought on that basis. It is true that the Whigs claimed special merit for the adoption of those measures, because they asserted that their great Clay originated them, their god-like Webster defended them and their Fillmore signed the bill making them the law of the land; but on the other hand, the Democrats claimed special credit for the Democracy, upon the ground that we gave twice as many vo
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery., Fourth joint debate, at Charleston, September 18, 1858. (search)
two parties. I had the highest respect for Henry Clay as a gallant party leader, as an eminent star of that system of Compromise measures which Mr. Clay introduced, Webster defended, Cass supported,ved the days of the Revolution. They looked to Clay, then in retirement at Ashland, and to Webster and Cass in the United States Senate. Clay had retired to Ashland, having, as he supposed, performeeater of his great deeds. From the moment that Clay arrived among us he became the leader of all thch assembled, each day, in the council-chamber, Clay in the chair, with Cass upon his right hand andhern disunionists. We did devise those means. Clay brought them forward, Cass advocated them, the led inhabitants, defended each and every one of Clay's Compromise measures as they passed the Senateme convinced that they had done an injustice to Clay, Webster, Cass, and all of us who had supported have wandered from the true path marked out by Clay and carried out broad and wide by the great Web[2 more...]
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery., Fifth joint debate, at Galesburgh, October 7, 1858. (search)
Garrison enunciated, but when he gets down a little further South he claims that he is an old line Whig, a disciple of Henry Clay, and declares that he still adheres to the old line Whig creed, and has nothing whatever to do with Abolitionism, or neinterfere with us, or complain of us merely because our system differs from theirs. In the Compromise Measures of 1850, Mr. Clay declared that this great principle ought to exist in the Territories — as well as in the States, and I reasserted his dohose acts as to what was to be done in relation to slavery during the territorial existence of those Territories, while Henry Clay constantly made the declaration (Judge Douglas recognizing him as a leader) that, in his opinion, the old Mexican laws as Judge Douglas? or one employed in so apt a way to do it? I have said once before, and I will repeat it now, that Mr. Clay, when he was once answering an objection to the Colonization Society, that it had a tendency to the ultimate emancipatio
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery., Sixth joint debate, at Quincy, October 13, 1858. (search)
y the sentiments advanced by our old Whig leader, Henry Clay, and I have the book here to show it from; but bee doctrine that I carried out in 1850, by supporting Clay's Compromise measures. The Union also charges that stand where I stood in 1850, when I was supported by Clay, Webster, Cass, and the great men of that day, and wsucceeds in proving, from my speeches in Congress on Clay's Compromise measures, that I held the same doctrine the following propositions: First, that I sustained Clay's Compromise measures on the ground that they establnd Nebraska bill founded upon the same principles as Clay's Compromise measures of 1860; and thirdly, that my are told that a man is not a Democrat who stands by Clay, Webster, and Cass, and the Compromise measures of 1pendence, I have only uttered the sentiments that Henry Clay used to hold. Allow me to occupy your time a moment with what he said. Mr. Clay was at one time called upon in Indiana, and in a way that I suppose was very
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery., The last joint debate, at Alton, October 15, 1858. (search)
nd that it was based upon the same principle as Clay's Compromise measures of 1850. The Union thus n the Declaration of Independence. Hear what Mr. Clay said : And what is the foundation of thds more before I add some comments of my own. Mr. Clay says a little further on: I desire no ct if I say a word about it — if I attempt, as Mr. Clay said all good men ought to do, to keep it in olitionism. We did not hear much about the old Clay Whig party up in the Abolition districts. How wenty-five years, the confidential friend of Henry Clay in Illinois, and he testified that in 1847, peech, urged, as another reason for throwing Henry Clay overboard, that the Whigs had fought long enhat he is an old Clay Whig. What part of Henry Clay's policy did Lincoln ever advocate? He was country. Who got up that sectional strife that Clay had to be called upon to quell? I have heard Lthat strife that I helped Clay to put down. Henry Clay came back to the Senate in 1849, and saw tha[25 more...]
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery., Speech of Hon. Abraham Lincoln, at Columbus Ohio, September, 1859. (search)
eing done by the teachers of this insidious popular sovereignty. You need but one or two turns further until your minds, now ripening under these teachings, will be ready for all these things, and you will receive and support, or submit to, the slave-trade, revived with all its horrors, a slave code enforced in our Territories, and a new Dred Scott decision to bring slavery up into the very heart of the free North. This, I must, say, is but carrying out those words prophetically spoken by Mr. Clay, many, many years ago — I believe more than thirty years, when he told an audience that if they would repress all tendencies to liberty and ultimate emancipation, they must go back to the era of our independence and muzzle the cannon which thundered its annual joyous return on the Fourth of July ; they must blow out the moral lights around us ; they must penetrate the human soul and eradicate the love of liberty; but until they did these things, and others eloquently enumerated by him, they
ated by Madame Mantelli, a lady who lived opposite Mr. Clay's, and who was an accomplished French scholar. Oue State. This was the year the gallant and magnetic Clay went down in defeat. Lincoln, in the latter end of nt created more widespread regret than the defeat of Clay by Polk. Men were never before so enlisted in any mld never shave their faces or cut their hair till Henry Clay became President. As late as 1880 I saw one man resolution. One political society organized to aid Clay's election sent the defeated candidate an address, ie yielded to the impression that Mr. Lincoln visited Clay at his home in Lexington and felt a personal loss inmajority of 1511 in the district, a larger vote than Clay's two years before, which was only 914. In Sangamon nk them for the kind partiality, and I can say, as Mr. Clay said of the annexation of Texas, that, personally, could be elected, and was correspondingly averse to Clay because of the latter's signal defeat in 1844. In a
d believed he would write a lecture on Man and His Progress. Afterwards I re a~d in a paper that he had come to either Bloomington or Clinton to lecture and no one turned out. The paper added, That doesn't look much like his being President. I once joked him about it;, e s? id good-naturedly Don't; that plagues me. --Henry a. Whitney letter, Aug. 27, 1867. The effort met with the disapproval of his friends, and he himself was filled with disgust. If his address in 1852, over the death of Clay, proved that he was no eulogist, then this last effort demonstrated that he was no lecturer. Invitations to deliver the lecture — prompted no doubt by the advertisement given him in the contest with Douglas — came in very freely; but beyond the three attempts named, he declined them all. Press of business in the courts afforded him a convenient excuse, and he retired from the field. Springfield, March 28, 1859. W. M. Morris, Esq., Dear Sir:--Your kind note inviting me to deliver a l
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