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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Cold Harbor. June 1st, 1864. (search)
igade, Brig.-Gen. George J. Stannard: 23d Mass., Col. Andrew Elwell; 25th Mass., Capt. Francis E. Goodwin; 27th Mass., Maj. William A. Walker; 9th N. J., Capt. Augustus Thompson; 89th N. Y., Col. H. S. Fairchild; 55th Pa., Capt. George H. Hill. Second Brigade, Col. Griffin A. Stedman: 11th Conn., Lieut.-Col. William C. Moegling; 8th Me., Maj. William M. McArthur; 2d N. H., Col. Edward L. Bailey; 12th N. H., Maj. John F. Langley; 148th N. Y., Col. George M. Guion. Third division, Brig.-Gen. Charles Devens, Jr. First Brigade, Col. William B. Barton: 47th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. C. R. Macdonald; 48th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. D. W. Strickland; 115th N. Y., Maj. Ezra L. Walrath; 76th Pa., Col. John:C. Campbell. Second Brigade, Col. Jeremiah C. Drake: 13th Ind., Col. Cyrus J. Dobbs; 9th Me., Capt. Robert J. Gray; 112th N. Y., Capt. J. S. Mathews; 169th N. Y., Col. John McConihe. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Adelbert Ames: 4th N. H., Col. Louis Bell; 3d N. Y., Col. Samuel M. Alford; 117th N. Y., Col. A
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Eighteenth Corps at Cold Harbor. (search)
The attack was begun about 4:30 P. M. by the advance of the divisions of Generals Brooks and Devens. Under a severe fire they crossed the open field, and, entering the wood, made their way througa most pressing want; and during the morning a division of the Sixth Corps took the place of General Devens's division in the lines, enabling me to shorten my front so that it could be held. A divising down the stream partial shelter from a cross-fire from the right. The plan adopted gave to Devens, with his division, the duty of keeping the right flank secure. Martindale's division was to moreported that he was waiting your advance to enable him to assault. My right was held by General Devens, and his troops could not be spared for an assault. Of General Martindale's two brigades, Sp, and Stedman, in addition to having been repulsed, was holding the line between Martindale and Devens, and also endeavoring to keep down the cross-fire from the right. Two of Brooks's brigades had
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Petersburg and Richmond: December 31st, 1864. (search)
N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Albert M. Barney. Second Brigade, Col. Galusha Pennypacker: 47th N. Y., Capt. Joseph M. McDonald; 48th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. William B. Coan; 76th Pa., Col. John S. Littell; 97th Pa., Lieut. John Wainwright; 203d Pa., Col. John W. Moore. Third Brigade, Col. Louis Bell: 13th Ind. (5 co's), Capt. Samuel M. Zent; 9th Me., Col. G. Frederick Granger; 4th N. H., Capt. John H. Roberts; 115th N. Y., Maj. Ezra L. Walrath; 169th N. Y., Col. Alonzo Alden. Third division, Brig.-Gen. Charles Devens, Jr. First Brigade, Lieut.-Col. John B. Raulston: 11th Conn., Lieut.-Col. Randall H. Rice; 13th N. H., Lieut.-Col. Normand Smith; 81st N. Y., Capt. Edward A. Stimson; 98th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. William Kreutzer; 139th N. Y., Capt. Theodore Miller; 19th Wis., Maj. Samuel K. Vaughan. Second Brigade, Col. Joseph H. Potter: 5th Md., Lieut.-Col. William W. Bamberger; 10th N. H., Lieut.-Col. John Coughlin; 12th N. H., Lieut.-Col. Thomas E. Barker; 96th N. Y., Col. Edgar M. Cullen; 118th N.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The fall of Richmond. (search)
race, the white troops on the turnpike and the colored in the fields. As we neared the city the fires seemed to increase in number and size, and at intervals loud explosions were heard. On entering we found Capitol Square covered with people who had fled there to escape the fire and were utterly worn out with fatigue and fright. Details were at once made to scour the city and press into service every able-bodied man, white or black, and make them assist in extinguishing the flames. General Devens's division marched into the city, stacked arms, and went to work. Parsons's engineer company assisted by blowing up houses to check its advance, as about every engine was destroyed or rendered useless by the mob. In this manner the fire was extinguished and perfect order restored in an incredibly short time after we occupied the city. As one of our aides was riding through the streets, engaged in gathering together the able-bodied men to assist in extinguishing the fire, he was haile
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Appomattox campaign. (search)
Capt. Henry C. Adams; 24th Mass. (detached at Bermuda Hundred), Capt. Thomas F. Edmands; 100th N. Y., Maj. James H. Dandy, Capt. Edwin Nichols; 206th Pa., Col. Hugh J. Brady. Fourth Brigade, Col. Harrison S. Fairchild: 8th Me., Lieut.-Col. Edward A. True, Capt. Edward H. Reynolds; 89th N. Y., Maj. Frank W. Tremain, Capt. William Dobie; 148th N. Y., Col. John B. Murray; 158th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. William H. McNary. Maj. Hyron Kalt; 55th Pa., Capt. George H. Hill. Third division, Brig.-Gen. Charles Devens, Jr. First Brigade, Col. Edward H. Ripley: 11th Conn., Maj. Charles Warren; 13th N. H., Lieut.-Col. Normand Smith; 81st N. Y., Capt. Matthew T. Betton; 98th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. William Kreutzer; 139th N. Y., Maj. Theodore Miller; 19th Wis., Maj. Samuel K. Vaughan. Second Brigade, Col. Michael T. Donohoe: 8th Conn., Maj. William M. Pratt; 5th Md., Lieut.-Col. William W. Bamberger; 10th N. H., Capt. Warren M. Kelley; 12th N. H., Lieut.-Col. Thomas E. Barker; 96th N. Y., Capt. George W
Fort Donelson C. F. Smith's ------ 55 38th Illinois Stone's River Davis's Fourteenth 55 37th Wisconsin Petersburg Mine Willcox's Ninth 55 7th Ohio Cedar Mountain Augur's Twelfth 55 5th New York Gaines' Mill Sykes's Fifth 55 140th New York Wilderness Griffin's Fifth 55 155th New York Cold Harbor Gibbon's Second 55 9th New York Antietam Rodman's Ninth 54 21st New York Manassas Hatch's First 54 40th New York Wilderness Birney's Second 54 112th New York Cold Harbor Devens's Tenth 54 115th New York Olustee Seymour's Tenth 54 120th New York Gettysburg Humphreys's Third 54 17th Maine Wilderness Birney's Second 54 18th Massachusetts Manassas Morell's Fifth 54 37th Massachusetts Wilderness Getty's Sixth 54 1st Michigan Manassas Morell's Fifth 54 4th Michigan Malvern Hill Morell's Fifth 54 18th U. S. Infantry Chickamauga Baird's Fourteenth 54 10th Vermont Cold Harbor Ricketts's Sixth 54 2d Iowa Fort Donelson C. F. Smith's ------ 54
dale's) Divisions of his own corps, and the Second (Devens') and Third Divisions (Ames' Divisions) of the Tents, forming the Third Division, under command of General Devens. Upon the close of the fighting at Cold Harborffectives, and was composed of the divisions of Generals Devens, Von Steinwehr, and Schurz. It contained 27 re place, two divisions of the Tenth Corps, under General Devens, temporarily attached to the Eighteenth as a thd at Cold Harbor by Generals Brooks, Martindale and Devens. In that battle the Eighteenth Corps made a gallanmed into a division of three brigades, which became Devens' (3d) Division of the Twenty-fourth Corps. As thvisions were commanded by Generals Foster, Ames and Devens, and were stationed on the north bank of the James,h Corps now consisted of three divisions, Foster's, Devens' and Turner's, containing 42 infantry regiments, anof the James to Petersburg, March 27, 1865, he left Devens' (3d) Division of the Twenty-fourth, and one divisi
December, 1864, it was placed in Donohoe's Brigade, Devens's Division, Twenty-fourth Corps. This brigade was o the Peninsula, in March, 1862, It was assigned to Devens's (3d) Brigade, Couch's (1st) Division, Fourth Corp — Griffin's Division--Second Corps. (1) Col. Charles Devens; Bvt. Major-Gen. (2) Col. George H. Ward; Bvt. 7, 1862. Arriving in Maryland it was assigned to Devens's (2d) Brigade of Couch's Division. This division regiment was transferred to Ripley's (1st) Brigade, Devens's (3d) Division, Twenty-fourth Corps. Fourteens the regiment was transferred to Ripley's Brigade, Devens's Division of the newly-formed Twenty-fourth Corps.ntinued, it was assigned to Roberts's (3d) Brigade, Devens's (3d) Division, Twenty-fourth Corps. It was muste, 55 wounded, and 24 missing; at Chancellorsville — Devens's Division, Eleventh Corps--it lost 14 killed, 107 amp for Chancellorsville, the brigade being then in Devens's (1st) Division, Eleventh Corps; the loss of the
114th Pennsylvania Birney's Third 20 123 38 181 2d Massachusetts Williams's Twelfth 21 110 7 138 123d New York Williams's Twelfth 16 114 18 148 25th Ohio Devens's Eleventh 14 107 31 152 8th New Jersey Berry's Third 18 101 6 125 82d Illinois Schurz's Eleventh 29 88 38 155 13th New Jersey Williams's Twelfth 17 100 24 141 5th New Jersey Berry's Third 13 102 6 121 37th New York Birney's Third 3 111 108 222 55th Ohio Devens's Eleventh 9 87 57 153 3d Wisconsin Williams's Twelfth 18 74 9 101 149th New York Geary's Twelfth 15 68 103 186 Marye's Heights, Va. Including losses at other parts of the field, Salem Heights, etc.     New York Brooks's Eighteenth 46 159 10 215 5th New Hampshire Barlow's Second 43 151 37 231 23d Pennsylvania Russell's Sixth 47 134 29 210 112th New York Devens's Composed of troops from the Tenth Corps temporarily attached. Eighteenth 28 140 12 180 25th Massachusetts Martindale's Eighteenth 24 142 49 215 188th P
teers were sent to Harrison's Island, under Col. Devens, who then had one company on the island, an mile to the right of the crossing place of Col. Devens, and see where, in a strong position, he could watch and protect the flank of Col. Devens in his return, and secure a second crossing more favaving left the shore to go inland, and thus Col. Devens was deprived of the means of obtaining warnore the guns on their way arrived. After Col. Devens' second advance, Colonel Baker went to the orted, and finding he would be outflanked, Colonel Devens retired a short distance and took up a pos other troops, the Massachusetts Fifteenth, Col. Devens, among them. They were soon attacked by ththe Fifteenth Massachusetts regiment, under Col. Devens, and two companies of the Twentieth (Tammanard firing, go to the support of Coggswell and Devens. Accordingly, Lieutenant-Colonel Wistar advan hostile forces in that region. But after Colonel Devens fell back his men were placed in a semicir[13 more...]
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