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Rebellion Record: Introduction., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore), Introduction. (search)
es: Ireland, Scotland. But let us look at parallel cases, and they are by no means wanting. In the year 1800, a union was formed between England and Ireland. Ireland, before she entered into the union, was subject, indeed, to the English crown, but she had her own parliament, consisting of her own Lords and Commons, and enacti nothing but a constitutional repeal of the articles of union by the parliament of Great Britain. It never occurred even to his fervid imagination, that, because Ireland was an independent government when she entered into the union, it was competent for her at her discretion to secede from it. What would our English friends, who hherent right of a disaffected State to secede from our Union, have thought, had Mr. O'Connell, in the paroxysms of his agitation, claimed the right on the part of Ireland, by her own act, to sever her union with England? Again, in 1706, Scotland and England formed a Constitutional Union. They also, though subject to the same mo
diana, alacrity of the troops of, D. 58 6th Regt. left Cincinnati, O., D. 86; troops at Philippi, D. 91 Indiana Zouaves, notice of, D. 95; leave Cumberland, Md., D. 100 Indian Trust Fund, D. 5 Indians. the Catawba tribes tender to Gov. Pickens, D. 16; notice of, D. 43; stationed at Harper's Ferry, D. 77; Cherokees in the Southern army, P. 126, 127 Ingraham, D. P., Judge, D. 40 Ingraham Henry, D. 27 Ink, Blood, and Tears, the taking of Fort Sumter, P. 90 Ireland, union with England, Int. 16 Irish Regular, anecdote of an, P. 57 Irishmen, among the rebels, D. 103 Ironton, Mo., lead seized at, D. 76 Irvine, Colonel, D. 83 Irving, Jim, notice of, P. 150 Ithaca, N. Y., volunteers from, D. 56 It is great for our Country to die, P. 105 Ives, T. P., commissioned in the revenue service, D. 71 J Jacobus, J. J., Mrs., P. 136 Jackson, Claiborne F., Gov. of Mo., his reply to Cameron, D. 30; secession sympa
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 82.-fight in Hampton roads, Va., March 8th and 9th, 1862. (search)
f the Navy. Report of the Sick and Wounded of the United States sloop-of-war Cumberland, March 10, 1862: Geo. W. Butt, seaman, Virginia, hospital of Seventh regiment, Camp Butler; burns and contusions of head and face. John Grady, seaman, Ireland, hospital of the Seventh regiment, Camp Butler; lacerated wound of right arm, burns of face. John McGwin, Providence, R. I., hospital at Fort Monroe; slight wound right side of head. John Bates, New-York City, hospital at Fort Monroe; sligoe; contusion of right thigh. Alexander McFadden, Mate, Philadelphia, hospital at Fort Monroe; lacerated wound of left fore-arm. John B. Cavenaugh, Whitehall, N. Y., hospital at Fort Monroe; slight wound over the left temple. John Bart, Ireland, hospital at Fort Monroe; contusion and abrasion of back. J. V. Russell, Philadelphia, hospital at Fort Monroe; exhaustion — a long time in the water. Lochlin Livingston, Boston, Mass., hospital at Fort Monroe; intermittent fever. James
's. Old Stonewall, after riding down to the river, returned to Bolivar Heights, the observed of all observers. He was dressed in the coarsest kind of homespun, seedy and dirty at that; wore an old hat which any Northern beggar would consider an insult to have offered him, and in his general appearance was in no respect to be distinguished from the mongrel, bare-footed crew who follow his fortunes. I had heard much of the decayed appearance of the rebel soldiers, but such a looking crowd! Ireland in her worst straits could present no parallel, and yet they glory in their shame. The force surrendered. As soon as Jackson returned from the village, our entire force was mustered on Bolivar preparatory to stacking arms and delivering over generally. They comprised the following: Twelfth N. Y. State Militia, from New-York,600 Thirty-ninth New-York,530 One Hundred and Eleventh New-York--raw troops,1,000 One Hundred and Fifteenth New-York--raw troops,1,000 One Hundred and Twen
's. Old Stonewall, after riding down to the river, returned to Bolivar Heights, the observed of all observers. He was dressed in the coarsest kind of homespun, seedy and dirty at that; wore an old hat which any Northern beggar would consider an insult to have offered him, and in his general appearance was in no respect to be distinguished from the mongrel, bare-footed crew who follow his fortunes. I had heard much of the decayed appearance of the rebel soldiers, but such a looking crowd! Ireland in her worst straits could present no parallel, and yet they glory in their shame. The force surrendered. As soon as Jackson returned from the village, our entire force was mustered on Bolivar preparatory to stacking arms and delivering over generally. They comprised the following: Twelfth N. Y. State Militia, from New-York,600 Thirty-ninth New-York,530 One Hundred and Eleventh New-York--raw troops,1,000 One Hundred and Fifteenth New-York--raw troops,1,000 One Hundred and Twen
casualties as resulting from a recent brilliant but disastrous encounter with the Alabama: John C. O'Leary, fireman, Ireland, killed; William Healy, fireman, Ireland, killed; Edward McGowan, fireman, Ireland,. severe wound in the thigh; John WhiIreland, killed; Edward McGowan, fireman, Ireland,. severe wound in the thigh; John White, first cabin-boy, slight wound in the leg; Edward Mattock; Captain's Mate Delano, slight wound in the hand; Christopher Steptowick, seaman, Austria, slight wound in back; Patrick Kane, landsman, Ireland, slight wound in leg. Acting Master PartridIreland,. severe wound in the thigh; John White, first cabin-boy, slight wound in the leg; Edward Mattock; Captain's Mate Delano, slight wound in the hand; Christopher Steptowick, seaman, Austria, slight wound in back; Patrick Kane, landsman, Ireland, slight wound in leg. Acting Master Partridge and five men are missing, all of whom we may hope have reached the fleet off Galveston. The wounded are in a favorable condition and will soon be able to return to duty again in the service of their country. Although destitute of medicines,Ireland, slight wound in leg. Acting Master Partridge and five men are missing, all of whom we may hope have reached the fleet off Galveston. The wounded are in a favorable condition and will soon be able to return to duty again in the service of their country. Although destitute of medicines, owing to the rapid sinking of the Hatteras, and even of sufficient covering for the wounded, yet no difficulty was experienced in their proper treatment. An ample supply of medicines and medical appliances were placed at my disposal by the medical
driven back after a short contest; but farther on the resistance became so great from their infantry force, and the tremendous fire from artillery on my right regiments, that they were forced to fall back, but rallied at the breastworks, about one hundred and fifty yards in our rear. My left regiment, (Thirteenth North Carolina,) not being subjected to the artillery fire, did not fall back, but continued to advance for a long distance, with the brigade on my left; and in this advance Lieutenant Ireland, Company E, Thirteenth North Carolina, rushed gallantly forward and captured Brigadier-General Hays and staff, who were endeavoring to escape. Corporal Monroe Robinson, Company A, Thirteenth North Carolina, also, about this time, chased a color-bearer so closely that he tore off the colors and threw down the staff, which was secured. After the other four regiments fell back to the breastworks and were re-formed, I advanced again, the men going forward with alacrity; but, after pene
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.31 (search)
ales is the most beautiful country in the world. But, I am quite willing to admit that the Welsh are as good as any, and that they might surpass the majority of people if they tried, and that Wales contains within its limited area as beautiful scenes as any. The result of my observations is that in Nature the large part of humanity is on a pretty even plane, but that some respectable portion of it, thank Goodness! has risen to a higher altitude, owing to the advantages of civilisation. But there is a higher altitude still, which can only be reached by those nations who leave off brooding among traditions, and grasp firmly and gratefully the benefits offered to them by the progress of the age, and follow the precepts of the seers. Wales for the Welsh is as senseless as Ireland for the Irish. A common flag waves over these happy islands, uniting all in a brotherhood sealed by blood. Over what continents has it not streamed aloft? Who can count the victories inscribed on it?
obsessed. While the war soon developed far beyond what he or any other one man could possibly have compassed, so that he is probably directly responsible for only a fraction of the whole vast collection of pictures in these volumes, he may fairly be said to have fathered the movement; and his daring and success undoubtedly stimulated and inspired the small army of men all over the war-region, whose unrelated work has been laboriously gathered together. Matthew H. Brady was born at Cork, Ireland (not in New Hampshire, as is generally stated) about 1823. Arriving in New York as a boy, he got a job in the great establishment of A. T. Stewart, first of the merchant princes of that day. The youngster's good qualities were so conspicuous that his large-minded employer made it possible for him to take a trip abroad at the age of fifteen, under the charge of S. F. B. Morse, who was then laboring at his epoch-making development of the telegraph. Naturally enough, this scientist took hi
er witnesses of the struggle, although the haze was so dense that they caught a glimpse only now and then as the clouds would rise. reenforcements came to the Confederates and they availed nothing. Geary's troops had been ordered to halt when they reached the foot of the palisades, but fired by success they pressed impetuously forward. From its higher position at the base of the cliff Cobham's brigade showered volley after volley upon the Confederate main line of defense, while that of Ireland gradually rolled up the flank. The Federal batteries on Moccasin point across the river were doing what they could to clear the Mountain. The Southerners made a last stand in their walls and pits around the Craven house, but were finally driven in force over rocks and precipices into Chattanooga Valley. such was the battle in the clouds, a wonderful spectacle denied the remainder of Hooker's troops holding Lookout Valley. That General says, from the moment we had rounded the peak of t
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