Your search returned 777 results in 353 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...
Rebellion Record: Introduction., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore), Introduction. (search)
mories which gave to Virginia her name and her praise in the land, are no longer cherished; the work of Washington, and Madison, and Randolph, and Pendleton, and Marshall is repudiated, and nullifiers, precipitators, and seceders gather in secret conclave to destroy the Constitution, in the very building that holds the monumental ed by him officially or privately; adjudged to be constitutional by the Supreme Court of the United States; distinctly approved by Washington, Patrick Henry, and Marshall; and, whatever else may be said of them, certainly preferable to the laws which, throughout the Seceding States, Judge Lynch would not fail to enforce at the lamte date with Northern sentiment on the subject of Slavery, I might add the testimony of Washington, of Patrick Henry, of George Mason, of Wythe, of Pendleton, of Marshall, of Lowndes, of Poinsett, of Clay, and of nearly every first-class name in the Southern States. Nay, as late as 1849, and after the Union had been shaken by the
Greatly descended men.--The son of Light-Horse Harry Lee, of Revolutionary renown, commands the forces of Virginia. His chief aid is J. A. Washington, the only living representative of Washington. The great-grandson of Thomas Jefferson commands the Howitzer Battery at Richmond. A grandson of Patrick Henry is Captain of the Virginia forces. The descendants of Chief Justice Marshall are in the ranks and in command.--Erie (Pa.) Observer, May 25.
earthquake, a solid mass of earth shot two hundred feet into the air, and a flame of fire burst from the vent as from a new-born volcano. Smoke rose after the ascending column. There in mid-air, earth, cannon, timbers, sand-bags, human beings, smoke, and fire, hung suspended an instant, and bursting asunder, fell back into and around the smoking crater where three hundred Confederates had met their end. when the cloud of smoke had cleared away, the waiting troops of Ledlie charged, Colonel Marshall at the head of the Second Brigade, leading the way. They came to an immense Federal fighters at Reams' Station. these men of Barlow's First division of the Second Corps, under command of Brigadier-General Nelson A. Miles, gallantly repulsed the Second and third attacks by the Confederates upon Reams' Station, where Hancock's men were engaged in destroying the Weldon Railroad on August 24, 1864. in the First picture is seen Company D of the famous Clinton guard, as the sixty-f
earthquake, a solid mass of earth shot two hundred feet into the air, and a flame of fire burst from the vent as from a new-born volcano. Smoke rose after the ascending column. There in mid-air, earth, cannon, timbers, sand-bags, human beings, smoke, and fire, hung suspended an instant, and bursting asunder, fell back into and around the smoking crater where three hundred Confederates had met their end. when the cloud of smoke had cleared away, the waiting troops of Ledlie charged, Colonel Marshall at the head of the Second Brigade, leading the way. They came to an immense Federal fighters at Reams' Station. these men of Barlow's First division of the Second Corps, under command of Brigadier-General Nelson A. Miles, gallantly repulsed the Second and third attacks by the Confederates upon Reams' Station, where Hancock's men were engaged in destroying the Weldon Railroad on August 24, 1864. in the First picture is seen Company D of the famous Clinton guard, as the sixty-f
hields reached the village of Port Republic, where Jackson encountered him and drove him back down Luray Valley, and thus ended the Valley Campaign of that year. General Beverly Robertson was now assigned to the command of the old Ashby brigade. On the 2d of August, a sharp hand-to-hand encounter took place in the streets of Orange Court House, between the Seventh Virginia, and the Fifth New York and First Vermont, both commanded by General Crawford, in which Colonel Jones and Lieutenant-Colonel Marshall, of the Seventh Virginia, were wounded. The Sixth Virginia coming up, the Federals reluctantly gave way, and were pursued as far as Rapidan Station. On December 29th, 1862, General W. E. Jones was assigned to the command of the Valley District, and in March, 1863, he moved to Moorefield Valley, with the view of gathering much-needed supplies of food, and also with the intention of destroying the Cheat River viaduct, on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. The south branch, at Pet
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, chapter 7 (search)
P. Hill moves. battle of Mechanicsville. Porter's retreat. A. P. Hill's advance. Gaines Mill position. the chances. Jackson at Cold Harbor. Porter's account. Hill's account. Lee's account. Jackson ordered in. general advance. enemy's escape. casualties. remarks. When Gen. Lee, on June 1, 1862, took command of the Army of Northern Virginia, he brought with him his personal staff, — Col. R. H. Chilton, Adjutant, Col. A. L. Long, Military Secretary, and Majs. Taylor, Venable, Marshall, and Talcotts, as Aides. He retained the chiefs of all departments, — Corley as Quartermaster, Cole as Commissary, Guild as Medical Director, and myself as Ordnance Officer, — and all matters of routine went on as before. The chances of a successful campaign against McClellan had increased greatly when Johnston fell, wounded, as has been already told. Johnston had proposed the concentration at Richmond of a large force, to be drawn from points farther south. Lee would be able to bring<
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 22: the Mine (search)
also the 61st N. C. from Hoke, a combined movement upon both flanks of the crater was organized. Mahone attacked on the left, with Sanders's brigade, the 61st N. C. and the 17th S. C.; Johnson attacked on the right with the 23d S. C. and the remaining five companies of the 22d, all that could be promptly collected on that flank. This attack was easily successful. Mahone has stated that the number of prisoners taken in the crater was 1101, including two brigade commanders, Bartlett and Marshall. The tabular statement of the Medical Department gives the Federal casualties of the day as: killed, 419; wounded, 1679; missing, 1910; total, 4008. Elliott's brigade reported the loss by the explosion as:— TOTALAGG. In 18th S. C. 4 companies86About 300 were blown up, but a small percentage escaped alive. In 22d S. C. 5 companies170 In Pegram's battery out of 30 Present 22278 Including these, Johnson reports the casualties in his division (Elliott, Wise, Ransom, Gracie), as fo
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 23: the fall of 1864 (search)
once through our lines by Col. Forsyth of Sheridan's staff, who was accompanied by Col. Taylor, Lee's adjutant. The meeting, by strange coincidence, took place in the house of Maj. Wilmer McLean, who had owned the farm on Bull Run on which had occurred the first collision between the two armies at Blackburn's Ford on July 18, 1861, and who also owned the farm and house used for similar purposes to-day, as told in the account of that battle. Lee was accompanied to the meeting only by Col. Marshall, his military secretary, and a single courier, who held their horses during the two or three hours consumed. A quiet dignity characterized Lee's bearing throughout the scene, and on the part of all Federal officers present there an evident desire to show only the friendliest feelings. The formal proceedings were limited to an exchange of notes, Grant's note being as follows:— Appomattox C. H., Va., April 9, 1865. General: In accordance with the substance of my letter to you o
ent, to be sent abroad for military supplies. Respectfully, your obedient servant, G. T. Beauregard, Genl. Comdg. Headquarters, Department S. C., Ga., and Fla., Charleston, S. C., August 2d, 1863. Lieut.-Col. D. B. Harris, Chief-Engineer, etc., etc.: Colonel,—The Commanding General directs that a battery for two 24pound-ers be thrown up between Battery Beauregard and the new Middle Battery, in Sullivan's Island, and that another shall be erected between the latter battery and Battery Marshall for two 32-pounders. Two columbiad platforms in mortar batteries at Fort Johnson will be taken up and transferred to some point at which they may be needed, and their places supplied by platforms for barbette guns. Have any of the star-torpedoes been sent afloat in the Stono? If not, what is the obstacle to its being done? Respectfully, your obedient servant, Thomas Jordan, Chief of Staff. Headquarters, Department S. C., Ga., and Fla., Charleston, S. C., August 3d, 1863. Brig.-
r such pretension, no ordinance for it, or title. On all grounds of reason, and waiving all questions of positive statute, the Vermont judge was nobly right, when, rejecting the claim of a slave-master, he said, No; not until you show a bill of sale from the Almighty. Nothing short of this impossible link in the chain of title would do. I know something of the great judgments by which the jurisprudence of our country has been illustrated; but I doubt if there is any thing in the wisdom of Marshall, the learning of Story, or the completeness of Kent, which will brighten with time like this honest decree. In closing his grand argument, Mr. Sumner used these hopeful words:-- Let the answer become a legislative act, by the admission of Kansas as a free State. Then will the barbarism of slavery be repelled, and the pretension of property in man be rebuked. Such an act, closing this long struggle by the assurance of peace to the Territory, if not of tranquillity to the whole count
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...