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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wisconsin, (search)
t approved......Feb. 3, 1809 Thomas Nuttall and John Bradbury, naturalists, explore Wisconsin......1809 Governor Clarke takes possession of Prairie du Chien and builds Fort Shelby......1813 Fort Shelby surrendered to the British under Colonel McKay......July 19, 1814 United States troops occupy Prairie du Chien and commence Fort Crawford on the site of Fort McKay, formerly Fort Shelby......June, 1816 Fort Howard, on Green Bay, built and garrisoned by American troops under Col. John Miller......1816 First grist-mill in western Wisconsin built at Prairie du Chien by John Shaw......1818 Solomon Juneau arrives at Milwaukee......Sept. 14, 1818 Wisconsin attached to Michigan Territery upon admission of Illinois into the Union......Dec. 3, 1818 Winnebago Indians massacre three whites at Prairie du Chien......June 28, 1827 Treaty concluded with the Menomonee and other Indian tribes at Butte des Morts......Aug. 11, 1827 Fort Winnebago built at the portage betwee
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Verrazzano, Giovanni da 1508- (search)
ar of tempests or other dangers. Turning towards the south, at the entrance to the harbour, on both sides, there are very pleasant hills, and many streams of clear water, which flow down to the sea. In the midst of the entrance, there is a rock of free-stone, formed by nature, and suitable for the construction of any kind of machine or bulwark for the defence of the harbour. The above description applies to Narraganset Bay and the harbor of Newport In Rhode Island, although mistaken by Dr. Miller, in his discourse before this society, as published In the first volume of the former series of Collections, for the bay and harbor of New York. The latter are briefly described in a preceding paragraph of this translation with sufficient clearness to admit of their being easily recognized. The island of a triangular form, resembling the island of Rhodes, which Verrazzano mentions as 50 leagues to the east of New York, is doubtless Block Island.—ed. Having supplied ourselves with ever
. 30, 1858. 24,734,William GoodaleJuly 12, 1859. 25,191,William GoodaleAug. 23, 1859. 27,959,Louis D. BarrandApril 24, 1860. 28,188,G. F. LufberryMay 8, 1860. 28,537,S. E. PetteeMay 29, 1860. 30,191,H. G. ArmstrongOct. 2, 1860. 32,777,John Miller, Jr.July 9, 1861. 37,573,J. J. GreenoughFeb. 3, 1863. 37,726,C. H. MorganFeb. 17, 1863. 38,253,Joseph WellsApril 21, 1863. 38,452,S. E. PetteeMay 5, 1863. 40,001,Joseph WellsSept. 15, 1863. 42,313,Joseph WellsApril 12, 1864. 43,773,J. M. Hatented a method for making double paper by bringing a sheet previously formed in contact with the stuff on the belt and passing both between press-rollers; any number of thicknesses, it was claimed, might be combined in this way. Crompton and Miller patented a method of cutting an endless web of paper lengthwise by means of revolving blades on a rotary shaft. Mason Hunting, of Watertown, Mass., patented an improved top press roller, adjustable so as to form paper of any desired thickness
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 4: influence of Christian officers—concluded. (search)
ny military company. On the morning of the 8th of June, 1861, they were formed in front of the Court House in Lexington. The Court House square, the main street, the windows of the houses, were crowded with the citizens of the town and of the surrounding country. They were well drilled, handsomely equipped, and made a very imposing appearance. A beautiful Confederate flag, wrought by the hands of the ladies of Falling Spring congregation, was presented in very appropriate terms by the Rev. John Miller, and received in a few pertinent words by Captain White. A brief address was then made to them, and prayer offered for them and their invaded State, by the father of the captain; after which the command was given, and with solemn step they marched away amidst the sighs and tears of the whole community. A large number in carriages, on horseback, and on foot, followed in their rear to the river, a mile below the town; then returning entered the Presbyterian Church, where prayer and pr
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 15: Worcester County. (search)
anch of the Sanitary Commission. No record was kept by them of the amount of their labors and offerings. Phillipston Incorporated Oct. 20, 1786. Population in 1860, 764; in 1865, 736. Valuation in 1860, $294,353; in 1865, $320,834. The selectmen in 1861 were Russell Carruth, James G. Smith, Joseph H. Whitney; in 1862 and 1863, Courtlon Sanderson, Emory Bates, Thomas Martin; in 1864, Courtlon Sanderson, Edward Powers, James G. Smith; in 1865, Courtlon Sanderson, James G. Smith, John Miller. The town-clerk in 1861 was T. T. Miller; in 1862, 1863, 1864, and 1865, Thomas Martin. The town-treasurer in 1861, 1863, 1864, and 1865 was Thomas Martin; in 1862, Jason Goulding. 1861. The first town-meeting to act upon matters relating to the war was held on the 2d of May, at which patriotic resolutions, preceded by a preamble, were presented and adopted. The resolutions were in substance as follows:— Resolved, That as our town is small in territory and population it cannot
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died., List of Massachusetts officers and soldiers who died of wounds. (search)
, Alfred E., 2d Lieut.,10th Mass. Inf.,Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864.May 12, 1864. Miller, Charles A., Corp.,25th Mass. Inf.,June 3, 1864,Hampton, Va., July 9, 1864. Miller, Henry F., Corp.,39th Mass. Inf.,– –Washington, D. C., May 25, 1864. Miller, John,54th Mass. Inf.,Olustee, Fla., Feb. 20, 1864.Olustee, Fla., Feb. 20, 1864. Miller, Jonathan D. Name and rank.Command.When and Where Wounded.Date and Place of Death. Miller, Jonathan D.,27th Mass. Inf.,Arrowfield Church, Va., May Miller, Jonathan D. Name and rank.Command.When and Where Wounded.Date and Place of Death. Miller, Jonathan D.,27th Mass. Inf.,Arrowfield Church, Va., May 9, 1864.Old Point Comfort, Va., May 21, 1864. Miller, Lewis L.,12th Mass. Inf.,– –Oct. 3, 1862. Mitchell, Franklin A.,39th Mass. Inf.,– –Near Bethesda Church, Va., June 2, 1864. Mitchell, William J.,56th Mass. Inf.,Petersburg, Va., June 17, 1864.Petersburg, Va., June 17, 1864. Moffatt, Michael H.,10th Mass. Inf.,– –Chancellorsville, Va., May 8, 1864. Monahan, John,22d Mass. Inf.,Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864.Washington, D. C., Sept. 26, 1864. Moody, Edwin A., Corp.,24th Mass. Inf,
June 22, 1864. Merriam, Joseph H.,22d Mass. Inf.,June 27, 1862,Richmond, Va., July 11, 1862. Merrick, Lucius L., Sergt.,36th Mass. Inf.,Pegram Farm, Va., Sept. 30, 1864.Flag of Truce Boat, James River, Va., Oct. 10, 1864. Merrill, Benjamin,33d Mass. Inf.,– –Lookout Valley, Tenn., Nov. 3, 1863. Merrill, Charles W.,19th Mass. Inf.,– –Washington, D. C., May 13, 1863. Merrill, Stephen,39th Mass. Inf.,– –March 3, 1865. Merrow, George W.,1st Mass. H. A.,– –Belle Plain, Va., May 24, 1864. Messenger, David J.,15th Mass. Inf.,Ball's Bluff, Va., Oct. 21, 1861.Leesburg, Va. Messinger, Charles W.,39th Mass. Inf.,– –Before Petersburg, Va., Sept. 20, 1864. Midgley, Alfred E., 2d Lieut.,10th Mass. Inf.,Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864.May 12, 1864. Miller, Charles A., Corp.,25th Mass. Inf.,June 3, 1864,Hampton, Va., July 9, 1864. Miller, Henry F., Corp.,39th Mass. Inf.,– –Washington, D. C., May 25, 1864. Miller, John,54th Mass. Inf.,Olustee, Fla., Feb. 20, 1864.Olustee
Miller, Jonathan D. Name and rank.Command.When and Where Wounded.Date and Place of Death. Miller, Jonathan D.,27th Mass. Inf.,Arrowfield Church, Va., May 9, 1864.Old Point Comfort, Va., May 21, 1864. Miller, Lewis L.,12th Mass. Inf.,– –Oct. 3, 1862. Mitchell, Franklin A.,39th Mass. Inf.,– –Near Bethesda Church, Va., June 2, 1864. Mitchell, William J.,56th Mass. Inf.,Petersburg, Va., June 17, 1864.Petersburg, Va., June 17, 1864. Moffatt, Michael H.,10th Mass. Inf.,– –Chancellorsville, Va., May 8, 1864. Monahan, John,22d Mass. Inf.,Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864.Washington, D. C., Sept. 26, 1864. Moody, Edwin A., Corp.,24th Mass. Inf,– –Hampton, Va., May 28, 1864. Moore, Edward E.,1st Mass. H. A.,– –Aug. 27, 1864. Moore, Ephraim W.,2d Mass. Inf.,Cedar Mountain, Va.,Alexandria, Va., Aug. 20, 1862. Moore, John F.,22d Mass. Inf.,Gettysburg, Pa., July 2, 1863.July, 1863. Moran, Albert,56th Mass. Inf.,Wilderness, Va., May 12, 1864.– – Mores, Robert R.,
6, 30, 96, 118, 119, 120, 125, 126, 133 Millard, P. S., 536 Millen, James, 395 Millen, Patrick, 536 Miller, Andrew, 493 Miller, August, 1st, 395 Miller, August, 28th Mass. Inf., 536 Miller, August, 31st Mass. Inf., 395 Miller, Benjamin, 395 Miller, C. A., 469 Miller, Charles, 64 Miller, D. B., 395 Miller, Franklin, 536 Miller, Franz, 395 Miller, G. H., 395 Miller, H. F., 469 Miller, J. A., 78 Miller, J. D., 470 Miller, J. M., 536 Miller, Jacob, 191 Miller, James, 65 Miller, John, 469 Miller, Joseph, 536 Miller, L. L., 470 Miller, Luke, 536 Miller, Lysander, 536 Miller, Ozro, 55, 395 Miller, Silas, 395 Miller, Thomas (or S. H.), 536 Miller, William, 1st Mass. Cav., 536 Miller, William, 2d Mass., H. A., 536 Millett, Daniel, 493 Millett, G. C., 536 Millett, John, 536 Millican, W. W., 536 Milliken, A. F., 395 Mills, C. B., 395 Mills, Harrison, 395 Mills, J. H., 395 Mills, J. R., 395 Mills, J. S., 493 Milor, John, 536 Miltimore, James, 395 Mi
a, the Thirty-first, Fifty-second and Twenty-fifth Virginia regiments and the Ninth Virginia battalion, Flournoy's company of Virginia cavalry, and Anderson's and Miller's Virginia batteries, and at once entering upon the duties of his command, take the necessary steps to insure the safety and comfort of his troops. The Forty-foue Twenty-fifth Virginia battalion under Maj. A. J. Reger, and eight 6-pounders of the Lee battery under Capt. P. B. Anderson and the Rockbridge battery under Capt. John Miller. After the close of the engagement the Forty-fourth Virginia arrived, but did not become engaged; The Federal force was made up of the Ninth and Thirteenth ; it could not be otherwise where such brave fighting was done. The left of General Johnson's position had been intrenched and there were posted Anderson's and Miller's eight guns and the troops that were first turned out in the morning—the Twelfth Georgia, the Fifty-second Virginia, and Dabney's Pittsylvania cavalry, dismounte
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