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ommand by a severe sickness, arrived at Carthage, accompanied by Brig.-Gen. McCulloch of the Confederate forces, and Maj.-Gen. Pearce of the Arkansas State troops, with a force of nearly two thousand men. These timely reinforcements were hailed with Lee, Sturgis, Sweeny, and Sigel, were about to form a junction at Springfield, it was determined by Price, McCulloch, and Pearce, to march upon that place, and attack the enemy where he had taken his position in force. When the army reached Crane two hundred, coming from Louisiana, Texas, and Arkansas; and there were eighteen hundred Arkansas State troops under General Pearce. The total effective force was thus about eleven thousand, of whom nearly six thousand were mounted; and it had fift-part was masked to meet an advance. At this moment, when the fortunes of the day yet hung in doubt, two regiments of Gen. Pearce's command were ordered forward to support the centre. Reid's battery was also brought up and the Louisiana regiment w
for the task of devising measures to redress the wrongs of a member of this body and to vindicate the honor and dignity of the Senate. As no Democratic Senator proposed any action, Mr. Seward offered a resolution for a committee of five members, to be appointed by the President, to inquire into the assault and to report the facts, together with their opinion thereon. On motion of Mr. Mason, the resolution was so amended as to provide that the committee should be chosen by the Senate; and Pearce of Maryland, Cass of Michigan, Dodge of Wisconsin, Allen of Rhode Island and Geyer of Missouri, were selected. The committee was chosen wholly from the Democratic party, and contained no one friendly to Mr. Sumner. The same day, Lewis D. Campbell introduced a resolution into the House of Representatives reciting the particulars of the assault, and proposing a select committee of five to report such action as might be proper for the vindication of the House. After a brief debate, the resol
for the task of devising measures to redress the wrongs of a member of this body and to vindicate the honor and dignity of the Senate. As no Democratic Senator proposed any action, Mr. Seward offered a resolution for a committee of five members, to be appointed by the President, to inquire into the assault and to report the facts, together with their opinion thereon. On motion of Mr. Mason, the resolution was so amended as to provide that the committee should be chosen by the Senate; and Pearce of Maryland, Cass of Michigan, Dodge of Wisconsin, Allen of Rhode Island and Geyer of Missouri, were selected. The committee was chosen wholly from the Democratic party, and contained no one friendly to Mr. Sumner. The same day, Lewis D. Campbell introduced a resolution into the House of Representatives reciting the particulars of the assault, and proposing a select committee of five to report such action as might be proper for the vindication of the House. After a brief debate, the resol
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 40: outrages in Kansas.—speech on Kansas.—the Brooks assault.—1855-1856. (search)
s forward to get at Mr. Brooks, as I thought. (Congressional Globe, p. 1:354.) Pearce, senator, saw Sumner clutching at the cane or at Brooks. (Globe, p. 1354.) Bro site of Collamer's overturned desk No. 29, and his feet lying in the aisle. Pearce's testimony, Congressional Globe, p. 1355; Toombs's, p. 1355; Murray's, p. 1356from thirty to sixty, according to the varying impressions of the witnesses. Pearce's testimony, Congressional Globe, p. 1355; Crittenden's, p. 1359. There were seMurray at Goshen, N. Y., late in 1885. Crittenden, sitting in conversation with Pearce, another senator, whose seat was No. 23, heard the noise, and was on the spot iontrary to parliamentary usage) wholly of Sumner's political opponents; to wit, Pearce of Maryland, Allen of Rhode Island, Dodge of Wisconsin, Geyer of Missouri, and lt was only cognizable in the courts. (Congressional Globe, App. p. 656, 667.) Pearce maintained the conclusions of the report and at the same time apologized for Br
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register, Chapter 16: ecclesiastical History. (search)
been delayed nearly ten years. The church was opened for the performance of divine service, Oct. 15, 1761. Rev. Mr. Apthorp again visited England in 1765, where he received the degree of Doctor of Divinity, and became successively Vicar of Croydon, Rector of St. Mary-le-Bow, London, and a Prebendary of St. Paul's Cathedral. He died April 16, 1816, aged 83 years. The next Rector of Christ Church was Rev. Winwood Sarjeant, supposed to be a native of England, who was ordained Priest by Bishop Pearce, Dec. 19, 1756. He commenced his rectorship as a missionary in June, 1767, and continued to perform the duties of his office, until the commencement of the Revolutionary War, when he retired to Kingston, N. H., and afterwards to Newbury. In 1777 he had an attack of paralysis, and in 1778 went to England. He died at Bath, Sept. 20, 1780. The congregation had almost entirely dispersed at the beginning of the war. Perhaps no church in the country was more completely broken up. Of all the
28. Paige, 115, 316. Palfrey, 75, 114, 266, 8, 274, 363. Palmer, 292, 322, 9, 76, 425. Palsgrave, 258. Pantry, 32. Parents, 75. Parish, 35. Parker, 35, 59, 62, 75, 6, 80, 1, 177, 225, 80, 313, 27, 401. Parkes, 36, 59, 75, 81, 5. Parkman, 184. Parmele, 369. Parmenter, 239, 44. Parris, 145, 16, 398. Parsons, 185, 416. Patrick, 8, 11, 15, 32, 396, 7. Patten, 36, 8, 9, 59, 62, 129, 364. Patterson, 423. Payne, 186, 254. Peabody, 304, 12. Pearce, 308. Pearl, 416. Peck, 310. Peirce, 44, 68, 208, 365, 433. Pelham, 53, 6, 89, 119, 74, 226, 54. Pemberton, 126, 287. Perkins, 186, 204-6 327. Perry, 325, 7. Pervear. 314, 24. Peters, 43, 5. Pettingell, 328. Phillips, 117, 207, 255-7. Phinney, 423. Phipps, 211, 26. Phips, 112-15, 27, 30, 3, 53, 7, 68-70, 5, 6, 307, 10, 53, 4, 403, 7. Piambow, 391. Pickering, 321. Pickman, 310. Pigeon, 308. Pittimee, 391. Plympton, 168, 204, 435, 8.
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The civil history of the Confederate States (search)
nestly advocating principles on which they hoped to achieve success before the people and pacify the country. The vote, in fact, was not strictly a party vote, although designed especially to favor one particular party organization. Crittenden, Pearce and Kennedy, Old Line Whigs, supported the first resolution with as much heartiness as any Senators. That there were individual disunionists who were favorable to disunion per se, there can be no doubt. New England had contained many of that csession in a fortified city on the 4th of July, 1861. Among the distinguished leaders who supported war measures with vigor were Sumner, Fessenden, Chandler, Trumbull, Wade, Hale, Wilson, Sherman and Chase. The conservatives were represented by Pearce, Polk, Richardson of Illinois, Saulsbury, Bayard and Bright. Every New England senator except Morrill was given chairmanship of some committee. Sixteen States were put in complete control of the government. By a political understanding during
nomination of Mr. Douglas impossible. The balloting then commenced (Tuesday evening, May 1st), on the eighth day of the session. Pages 141-152. Necessary to a nomination, under the two-thirds rule, 202 votes. On the first ballot Mr. Douglas received 145 1/2 votes; Mr. Hunter, of Virginia, 42; Mr. Guthrie, of Kentucky, 35 1/2; Mr. Johnson, of Tennessee, 12; Mr. Dickinson, of New York, 7; Mr. Lane, of Oregon, 6; Mr. Toucey, of Connecticut, 2 1/2; Mr. Davis, of Mississippi, 1 1/2, and Mr. Pearce, of Maryland, 1 vote. The voting continued until 3d May, during which there were fifty-four additional ballotings. Mr. Douglas never rose to more than 152 1/2, and ended at 151 1/2 votes, 202 votes being necessary to a nomination. Of these votes, at least 110 were given by delegates from States which, judging from their antecedents, could not give him or any Democratic candidate a single electoral vote. This statement proves the wisdom and foresight of those who adopted the two-thi
pened. This movement of relieving the hunger and hardship of the soldiers originated with the women of Philadelphia, who, as early as the latter part of April, 1861, when the troops began to pass through that city, formed themselves into a committee and collected and distributed refreshments among them. They were aided in the work by the gentlemen, and as the troops increased in numbers the necessity of better accommodations was felt. It was then that William M. Cooper (firm of Cooper and Pearce), whose wife was one of the pioneers in the movement, gave up first a part, then nearly all of his establishment, for four years to the purpose of assisting the soldiers. The Union Saloon was established later, but the two worked in perfect harmony to the end of the war. They were located near each other, and a committee from each worked without friction in arranging for the reception of troops. See History of the Cooper Shop Volunteer Refreshment Saloon, by James Moore, M. D. When
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: (search)
eral Hardee's right, on the left of General Polk's corps, while the remainder of General Breckinridge's division moved to the support of the extreme right. It was thus that the Kentucky troops found themselves in one of the most stubbornly contested parts of the field, being pitted against the command of General Sherman, where was found the most stubborn resistance. In the first assault Lieutenant-Colonel Anderson and Major Johnston, of the Third Kentucky, were wounded, and Captains Stone, Pearce and Emerson, Lieutenant Bagwell, commanding company, and Acting Lieutenant White, of that regiment, were killed; while Captain Bowman, Adjutant McGoodwin and Lieutenants Ross and Ridgeway were wounded. Later the brigade had a prolonged contest with a heavy force of Ohio and Iowa troops, and drove them with a charge, the Kentucky troops singing their battle song, Cheer, boys, cheer; we'll march away to battle, and driving everything before them. The loss was heavy, Captains Ben Desha and Jo
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