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H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 2 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 2 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 5. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 2 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 2 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 18, 1865., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 24, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 2 0 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 2 2 Browse Search
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3. Pease, Chas. E., II, 382-385, 387-391. Peck, Wm. G., I, 111. Peel, Sir, Robert, I, 123. Peeples, Samuel, II, 88. Pell, Duncan, 322. Pell, Duncan A., I, 322, 323. Pemberton, Israel, I, 19, 39, 95, 141. Pemberton, John, I, 140. Pender, Wm. D., I, 294, 295; II, 26, 48, 52, 53, 69, 108, 129, 383. Pendleton, Mr., II, 150. Pennsylvania Reserves, I, 255, 304, 307-310, 313, 315, 337, 361, 388; II, 313-315. Penrose, Dr., I, 224. Penrose, Wm. M., I, 224. Perkins, Lieut., II, 394. Perrin, A., II, 52, 53. Perry, Com., I, 159. Perry, M. C., I, 192. Peters, Richard, I, 3. Petersburg, mine explosion, July 30, 1864, II, 217, 218, 266, 267, 345-349. Petersburg, siege of, 1864-1865, II, 204-269. Pettigrew, J. J., II, 25, 47, 49, 52, 69, 134. Peyton, Bailie, I, 90, 96, 139, 140. Phillips, Charles A., II, 80. Pickett, George E., I, 196, 288, 289, 294; II, 25, 26, 60, 69, 100, 105, 108, 109, 328. Pillow, Gideon J., I, 319. Pine
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Book 1: he keepeth the sheep. (search)
ned two years, when he entered into a partnership with Colonel Perkins. During his residence in Richfield, he lost four chil useful than the beautiful and ornamental. Chapter 4: Perkins and Brown, wool Factors. John Brown went to Springfielddealing. He was afterwards associated in business with a Mr. Perkins, of Ohio. and their firm was Perkins and Brown. They Perkins and Brown. They sold large quantities of wool on commission; most of it was for farmers living in Western Pennsylvania. Mr. Brown left here i and Anthony Burns. In the course of the partnership of Perkins and Brown, a lawsuit arose, which is thus described by a cars 1852, 1853, and 1854, Mr. Brown was one of the firm of Perkins & Brown, doing a large wool trade, buying and selling, in ol to parties in Troy, N. Y., brought on a lawsuit between Perkins & Brown and those parties. Mr. Brown's counsel resided inand his family returned to Akron, Ohio, where he managed Mr. Perkins's farm, and carried on the wool business. In 1855, on s
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 3: the man. (search)
ost a considerable amount of money. In March, 1839, he started from Ohio for Connecticut, with a drove of cattle. He returned in July of the same year, and brought back with him a few sheep, his first purchases in that business, in which he afterwards was so largely interested. In 1840, he went to Hudson, Ohio, and engaged in the wool business with Captain Oviatt, of Richfield ; to which, in 1842, John Brown removed, and remained two years, when he entered into a partnership with Colonel Perkins. During his residence in Richfield, he lost four children, all of them within eleven days; and three were carried out together and interred in the same grave. From boyhood, writes Mr. Oviatt, I have known him through manhood; and through life he has been distinguished for his truthfulness and integrity; he has ever been esteemed, by those who have known him, as a very conscientious man. It was in 1839 that he conceived the idea of becoming a Liberator of the Southern slaves. He ha
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 4: Perkins and Brown, wool Factors. (search)
Chapter 4: Perkins and Brown, wool Factors. John Brown went to Springfield, Massachusetts, in 1846. The following extract from a private letter by an eminent he business of wool-dealing. He was afterwards associated in business with a Mr. Perkins, of Ohio. and their firm was Perkins and Brown. They sold large quantitiePerkins and Brown. They sold large quantities of wool on commission; most of it was for farmers living in Western Pennsylvania. Mr. Brown left here in 1850 or 1851, and removed with his family to North Elba, Eshoes. John Brown and Anthony Burns. In the course of the partnership of Perkins and Brown, a lawsuit arose, which is thus described by a correspondent at Vern During the years 1852, 1853, and 1854, Mr. Brown was one of the firm of Perkins & Brown, doing a large wool trade, buying and selling, in Ohio, New York, and large quantity of wool to parties in Troy, N. Y., brought on a lawsuit between Perkins & Brown and those parties. Mr. Brown's counsel resided in Vernon, and he was
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 5: North Elba. (search)
times think that is what we came into the world for — to make sacrifices. And I know that the murmuring echo of those words went with me all that day, as we came down from the mountains, and out through the iron gorge; and it seemed to me that any one must be very unworthy the society which I had been permitted to enter who did not come forth from it a wiser and a better man. From the family we learn that: 1851 John Brown and his family returned to Akron, Ohio, where he managed Mr. Perkins's farm, and carried on the wool business. In 1855, on starting for Kansas, he again moved his household to North Elba, where they still reside, and where his body lies buried. At the Agricultural Fair of Essex County, for 1850, a great sensation was created by the unlooked — for appearance on the grounds of a beautiful herd of Devon cattle. They were the first that had been exhibited at the county festival, and every one was surprised and delighted at the incident. The inquiry
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli, Chapter 3: Girlhood at Cambridge. (1810-1833.) (search)
e read two hours in Italian, then walked or rode; and in the evening played, sang, and retired at eleven to write in her diary. This, be it observed, was at the very season when girls of fifteen or sixteen are, in these days, on their way to the seashore or the mountains. The school where she recited Greek was a private institution of high character in Cambridgeport, known familiarly as the C. P. P. G. S., or Cambridge Port private Grammar school, a sort of academy, kept at that time by Mr. Perkins, a graduate of Yale College. It was so excellent that it drew many pupils from what was then called Old Cambridge,--now Harvard Square,--then quite distinct from the Port, and not especially disposed to go to it for instruction. Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes was one of Margaret Fuller's fellow pupils, as were John Holmes, his younger brother, and Richard Henry Dana. From those who were her associates in this school, it is possible to obtain a very distinct impression of her as she then app
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli, Index. (search)
of her power of statement, 289; personal traits, 299; phrenological examination, 299; her life on the whole successful, 314. P. Palmer, Edward, 175. Papers on Literature and Art, 203. Park, Dr., 23. Parker, Theodore, letter from, 162; other references, 3, 86, 130, 132, 140, 142, 144, 160, 165, 169, 181. Parker, Mrs., Theodore, 128. Parton, James, 213. Paterculus, Velleius, 49, 50. Peabody, Miss Elizabeth P., 75, 114, 142, 168, 178, 192; letter to, 81. Pericles, 5. Perkins, Mr., 24. Petrarch, F., 136. Plutarch, 49, 50, 69. Poe, Edgar Allan, 156, 216, 217. Prescott, Misses, 23. Putnam, George, 142. Q. Quincy, Mrs., Josiah, 131. R. Radzivill, Princess, 231. Randall, Elizabeth, 39. Recamier, Madame, 37. Reformers in New England (1840-1850), 175. Richter, Jean Paul, 28, 45. Ripley, George, 91,142, 144, 146, 147, 149, 154, 157, 179-181, 183 189, 291. Ripley, Mrs. G., 163, 180, 183; letter to, 112. Robbins, S. D., 181. Robinson, Rev. Mr.
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 9: the beginnings of verse, 1610-1808 (search)
brilliant satirical picture of the Land of Annihilation, though obviously suggested by The Dunciad, is not unworthy of its original. The entire story of the strife between federalist and republican, Hamiltonian and Jeffersonian, can be read in the verse satire of the time. No American shows this bitter partisanship more than Thomas Green Fessenden (1771-1837). His Terrible Tractoration, written in England about English conditions, is not political but is chiefly aimed at the critics of Perkins's metallic tractors, an invention of which Fessenden was the agent. Its 1800 lines of Hudibrastic verse, full of references to contemporary persons and scientific matters, form a fair example of a not very admirable type of satire. Fessenden again displays his mental alertness and his indebtedness to Peter Pindar in Democracy Unveiled, or tyranny stripped of the Garb of patriotism. This surprising production, in which he reaches the nadir of indecent personalities, attacks Jacobinism, de
s and preaching, and on Wednesday evening, we believe, of each week between December and February, for a series of secular lectures by some chaplains of this corps. We were always heartily welcome to attend any and all services therein; and we have pleasurable recollections of the inimitable charm which pervaded the serio-comic discourse of Chaplain Bugle, of Rhode Island, who entertained us with a description and revelations of Broad Top City, and the eloquently instructive lecture of Chaplain Perkins, of Massachusetts. Nor do we forget tile spirited debates to which we used to listen, in the chapel of the Sixth Vermont. The alertness and suppleness of many of our boys was something wonderful; it was a spectacle suggestive of the athletic times of Greece and Rome, to witness their leaping, sparring, and racing. We had a half dozen men whose power of mimicry, conjoined with large mirthfulness, we have never seen surpassed. The effect of their display of this power, afte
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 11: George Thompson, M. P.—1851. (search)
to ask the knowledge which it may be dangerous to have—all remind one of those foreign scenes which have hitherto been known to us, transatlantic republicans, only in books. Yet we enjoy ourselves richly, and I doubt whether more laughing is done anywhere than in anti-slavery Ante, p. 144. parlors. We meet sometimes in an establishment whose noble owner had a slave in his employ, and kept him amid 100 workmen who resolved to receive the marshal á la Haynau and Baron Haynau, at Barclay & Perkins's brewery, London; Lib. 20.160. the brewers, if he made the arrest; and let it be known that the establishment had constantly on hand hot water and cold, some dirty and some clean. The marshal Charles Devens, afterwards a General in the civil war and U. S. Attorney-General under President Hayes's Administration. offered to make the arrest if the claimant would precede and point out the man. The claimant declined, went to Washington, complained, and it was during the marshal's absence to
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