Your search returned 542 results in 186 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 2: civil and military operations in Missouri. (search)
one of vast importance in his plans for seizing Bird's Point and Cairo. Whilst engaged in strongly fortifying Memphis, Randolph, and one or two other points on the Tennessee shore of the Mississippi, he earnestly recommended the occupation of New Marters at Memphis he ordered August 7, 1861. Pillow to evacuate New Madrid, and, with his men and heavy guns, hasten to Randolph and Fort Pillow, on the Tennessee shore. The ink of that dispatch was scarcely dry, when he countermanded the order, foore, and hence his order for Pillow August 7, 1861. to evacuate New Madrid and hasten with his troops and heavy guns to Randolph and Fort Pillow. Pillow demurred, and charged Polk, by implication, with keeping back re-enforcements, and thwarting hing the order for the evacuation of New Madrid, Polk directed Pillow to break up his base there, send his heavy cannon to Randolph and Fort Pillow, and, marching by the way of Pleasanton, join his forces with those of Hardee at Greenville. This was a
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 16: the Army of the Potomac before Richmond. (search)
y Bishop Johns. He was baptized at home in the morning before church. d — See Pollard's Second Year of the War, page 81. There was a general expectation that Richmond would be in the hands of McClellan within a few days. Every preparation was made by the Confederate authorities to abandon it. The archives of the Government were sent to Columbia, in South Carolina, and to Lynchburg. The railway tracks over the bridges were covered with plank, to facilitate the passage of artillery. Mr. Randolph, the Secretary of War, said to an attendant and relative, You must go with my wife into the country, for tomorrow the enemy will be here. The Secretary.of the Treasury had a special train, the steam of the locomotive continually up, ready for flight.--A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, II. 126. Disgusted and alarmed by the trepidation of the conspirators, the Legislature of Virginia, then in session; passed resolutions (May 14) calling upon the so-called Government of the Confederate States t
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 21: slavery and Emancipation.--affairs in the Southwest. (search)
North Carolina, 12; South Carolina, 8; Tennessee, 13; Texas, 8; Virginia, 18. Three days afterward Feb. 22, 1862. he was inaugurated President for six years. He chose for his Cabinet Judah P. Benjamin, of Louisiana, as Secretary of State ; George W. Randolph, of Virginia, Secretary of War ; S. R. Mallory, of Florida, Secretary of the Navy ; C. G. Memminger, of South Carolina, Secretary of the Treasury ; and Thomas H. Watts, of Alabama, Attorney-General. Randolph resigned in the autumn of 1862,Randolph resigned in the autumn of 1862, when James A. Seddon, a wealthy citizen of Richmond, who figured conspicuously in the Peace Convention at Washington, See chapter X., volume I. was chosen to fill his place. James A. Seddon. The Confederate Congress passed strong resolutions in favor of prosecuting the war more vigorously than ever, and declared, by joint resolution, that it was the unalterable determination of the people of the Confederate States to suffer all the calamities of the most protracted war, and that they w
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 19: the repossession of Alabama by the Government. (search)
earance on the Selma road, driving in Upton's pickets. These consisted of the commands of Roddy and Crossland. After a sharp fight with Alexander's brigade, they were routed by a charge of the Fifth Iowa Cavalry, and driven in confusion toward Randolph. They attempted to make a stand at Six-mile Creek, south of Montevallo, but were again routed with a loss of fifty men made prisoners. Upton bivouacked fourteen miles south of Montevallo that night, and early the next morning April 1. rode iack the Confederates, he skirmished with them a little, burned a factory at Scottsville, and then fell back. He destroyed the bridge over the Cahawba, at Centreville, and rejoined April 5, 1865. Wildon at Selma. Wilson pushed southward from Randolph with the brigades of Long and Upton, and at-Ebenezer Church, near Boyle's Creek, six miles north of Plantersville, he was confronted by Forrest who had five thousand men behind a strong barricade and abatis. Forrest was straining every nerve to
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 22: prisoners.-benevolent operations during the War.--readjustment of National affairs.--conclusion. (search)
se atrocities had been committed. He might have known, what the public records of the Confederate Government, now in Washington City, show, that so early as. September, 1862, the fact of cruelties toward Union prisoners was so well known to all the world, that the Conspirators felt the necessity of official, action, and that Augustus R. Wright, chairman of a committee of the House of Representatives made a report Sept. 22, 1862. on the prisons at Richmond confining Union captives, to George W. Randolph, then Secretary of War, in which report it was said that the state of things was terrible beyond description; that the committee could not stay in the room over a few seconds ; that a change must be made, and that the committee makes the report to the Secretary of War, and not to the House, because in the latter case, it would be printed, and, for the honor of the nation, such things must be kept secret. He might have known that, on the ninth of December, 1863, Henry S. Foote offered
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 7-12, 1862.--raid on Confederate line of communications between Chattanooga, Tenn., and Marietta, Ga. (search)
rsey, M. J. Hawkins, Jacob Parrott, Thirty-third Ohio Regiment. All of Sill's brigade, Buell's division. Respectfully forwarded to General Slaughter. G. W. Lee, Commanding Post. headquarters, Atlanta, Ga., Sept. 16, 1862. Hon. George W. Randolph, Secretary of War, Richmond, Va.: Sir: Your communication 11th instant is duly to hand. In reply I have respectfully to say that the arrest, incarceration, trial, and execution of the prisoners you refer to occurred before I took chaged with the arrangements for the proper execution thereof. By command of Maj. Gen. E. Kirby Smith: J. F. Belton, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General. To Commanding officer of post at Atlanta, Ga. Atlanta G, GASeptember 16, 1862. Hon. George W. Randolph, Secretary of War, Richmond, Va.: dear sir: Your letter of September 11, 1862, to Major Lee, provostmarshal, has been shown me by him, and, as far as I am acquainted with the matter, General Smith only sent from Knoxville instruct
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), June 3-5, 1862.-evacuation of Fort Pillow, Tenn., by the Confederates and its occupation by the Union forces. (search)
ces had all lefttwo of their gunboats only an hour or two before we approached. The people seemed to respect the flag which Lieutenant-Colonel Ellet planted. The guns had been dismantled and some piles of cotton were burning. I shall leave Lieutenant-Colonel Ellet here in the advance, and return immediately to Fort Pillow to bring on my entire force. The people attribute the suddenness of the evacuation to the attempt made night before last to sink one of their gunboats at Fort Pillow. Randolph, like Fort Pillow, is weak, and could not have held out long against a vigorous attack. The people express a desire for the restoration of the old order of things, though still professing to be secessionists. Chas. Ellet, Jr., Colonel, Commanding Ram Flotilla. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War. Washington, June 7, 1862. Col. Charles Ellet, Jr., Commander of Ram Fleet on the Mississippi (via Cairo): Your several dispatches have been received and your proceedings cordially approv
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), June 6, 1862.-naval engagement off Memphis, Tenn., and occupation of that city by Union forces. (search)
e was occasioned by a misapprehension of orders or misinformation as to the surrounding circumstances. The evacuation of Fort Pillow was, from all accounts, well and orderly conducted, after once determined upon, but by some means my men were sent to Memphis on a transport instead of being placed on the gun. boats. The circumstances which may have caused the evacuation of Fort Pillow did not surround Fort Randolph, and I am satisfied that, even with the few troops that were at Pillow, Randolph could have been held for several days, with a sure and safe retreat when necessary, if ever. Our fleet, for want of coal, as represented, fell back to Memphis on the 5th with the intention of returning to Island No.40. The arrangements for this purpose were being made, but before 10 o'clock p. m. on the 5th the tugs which were on picket above the city reported the enemy's tugs in sight. This was discredited, but our boats anchored in the channel of the river, prepared for a battle.
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), June 6, 1862.--naval engagement off Memphis, Tenn., and occupation of that city by Union forces. (search)
with the Queen of the West close enough to invite the fire of the rebel guns, but received no shot, while very considerable smoke and flames indicated the burning of the property of the enemy. Before daylight Lieutenant-Colonel Ellet, at his own suggestion, went in a yawl with a small boats crew down to the fort, found it deserted, and planted the Stars and Stripes there. I followed almost simultaneously with a portion of my fleet. After a brief delay I proceeded with three vessels to Randolph and sent Lieutenant-Colonel Ellet ashore with a flag of truce. He there ascertained that the rebel forces had been hastily withdrawn the night before, after destroying their artillery, burning a good deal of cotton, and doing what other mischief they could in the short time they could venture to remain. Later in the day the gunboats under Commodore Davis moved down the Mississippi toward Memphis, while I collected my fleet and passed the night on the Tennessee shore some 18 miles above
, Major-General. Navy Department, C. S. A., Richmond, April 1, 1862. Hon. George W. Randolph, Secretary of War: sir: Inclosed herewith I hand you the report of y, your obedient servant, R. E. Lee, General. Atlanta, May 1, 1862. Hon. George W. Randolph: The State has placed all her means of defense in the hands of the servant R. E. Lee, General, Commanding. Atlanta, Ga., May 2, 1862. Hon. George W. Randolph, Secretary of War: Your dispatch just received. Refers probably d now I can report that all the cotton (or at least all we could find) between Randolph (or near that place) and Vicksburg, within a reasonable distance of the river,General, Commanding. subsistence Department, Richmond, May 31, 1862. Hon. George W. Randolph, Secretary of War: sir: The telegram of General Beauregard of the 2ot General Marshall's resignation been accepted? If not, return it to me. G. W. Randolph. (Referred to Secretary of War, by order General Lee, June 15, 1862.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...