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Doc. 41.-twenty Eighth regiment N. Y. S. V. The following is a list of the officers: Dudley Donnelly, Colonel; Edwin F. Brown, Lieutenant-Colonel; James R. Mitchell, Major; Chas. P. Sproat, Adjutant; C. L. Skeels, Quartermaster; Rev. C. H. Platt, Chaplain; Dr. Helmer, Surgeon; Dr. Reagan, Assistant Surgeon. Captains and companies. Company A--(Lockport).--Captain, E. W. Cook; Company B--(Lockport).--Captain, W. W. Brush; Company C--(Lockport).--Captain, W. H. H. Mapes; Company D--(Medina).--Captain, Erwin S. Bowen; Company E--(Canandaigua).--Captain, T. Fitzgerald; Company F--(Batavia).--Captain, Charles H. Fenn; Company G--(Albion).--Captain, David Hardee; Company H--(Monticello).--Captain, John Walker, Jr.; Company I--(Niagara Falls).--Captain, T. P. Gould; Company K--(Lockport).--Captain, H. H. Page.--N. Y. Evening Post, June 26.
Doc. 109.-the Confederate Government. the Executive. President,Jefferson Davis, of Miss. Vice-President,Alex. H. Stephens, of Ga. the Cabinet. Secretary of State,Robert Toombs, Ga. Secretary of Treasury,C. L. Memminger, S. C. Secretary of War,Leroy P. Walker, Ala. Secretary of the Navy,Stephen R. Mallory, Fla. Postmaster-General,John H. Reagan, Texas. Attorney-General,Judah P. Benjamin, La. members of Congress. Virginia.  James A. Seddon.  W. Ballard Preston. 1.R. M. T. Hunter. 2.John Tyler. 3.W. H. Macfarland. 4.Roger A. Pryor. 5.Thomas S. Bocock. 6.Wm. S. Rives. 7.Robert E. Scott. 8.James M. Mason. 9.J. Brockenbrough. 10.Chas. W. Russell. 11.Robert Johnston. 12.Walter Staples. 13.Walter Preston. North Carolina.  Geo. Davis.  W. W. Avery. 1.W. N. H. Smith. 2.Thomas Ruffin. 3.T. D. McDowell. 4.A. W. Venable. 5.J. M. Morehead. 6.R. C. Puryer. 7.Burton Craige. 8.E. A. Davidson. Alabama. 1.R. W. Walker. 2.R. H. Smith. 3.J. L. M. Curry.
or others, to subscribers or dealers at points other than the place of publication, at a cost less than the regular rates of postage, it will at once be seen that the Department would lose much of its revenues; and publishers availing themselves of such modes of transmission, would secure such an advantage over others sending their papers by mail, as to injure the circulation of the latter or drive them to the same means of transmission, and the result would be, that the express companies would become the rivals of the Post-Office Department, and deprive it of a large amount of its legitimate revenues, and to that extent defeat the object had in view by Congress of making the Department self-sustaining. This reasoning does not apply, however, to books of a permanent character, other than periodicals sent in boxes or packages to merchants and dealers. Very respectfully yours, John H. Reagan. To the President Southern Express Company. --Montgomery (Ala.) Advertiser, July 31.
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 19: observations upon matters connected with the War. (search)
abinet of Jeff Davis to draw those terms of surrender, and they were drawn by Mr. Reagan, one of the members of Davis' cabinet. As evidence, fac-simile of them is pr courtesy of Brev. Brig.-Gen. H. V. Boynton. It is true Sherman does not copy Reagan's words exactly, but he copies his paper so far as the substance is concerned, Johnston says, to make it fuller, and he adds that Sherman wrote his copy with Reagan's before him. These terms had been submitted to Davis and his cabinet, and they-simile of the original draft of Sherman's terms with Johnston, as drawn by John H. Reagan, the Confederate Postmaster-General.] [fac-simile of the original draft of Sherman's terms with Johnston, as drawn by John H. Reagan, the Confederate Postmaster-General.] [fac-simile of the original draft of Sherman's terms with Johnston, as drawn by John H. Reagan, the Confederate Postmaster-General.] Confederate State governments were once restored to power then they could establish slavery in th
Sherman, commanding the Army of the United States in North Carolina, both present. I. (See 6, Reagan's draft.) The contending armies now in the field to maintain the status quo until notice is giveof any one to his opponent, and reasonable time, say forty-eight hours, allowed. II. (See 1, Reagan.) The Confederate armies now in existence to be disbanded and conducted to their several State clely to maintain peace and order within the borders of the States respectively. III. (See 3, Reagan.) The recognition by the Executive of the United States of the several State governments, on thee several States, with powers as defined by the Constitution and laws of Congress. V. (See 4, Reagan.) The people and inhabitants of all States to be guaranteed, so far as the Executive can, their defined by the Constitution of the United States and of the States respectively. VI. (See 5, Reagan.) The executive authority of the Government of the United States not to disturb any of the peopl
Quimby, Col., D. 84 Quinn, Michael, U. S. N., D. 77 Qui transtulit sustinet, P. 103 R Rafina, Father, raises the stars and stripes, D. 40 Railroad bridges destroyed, D. 58 Raleigh, N. C., alive with secessionists, D. 57 Rand, Edward sprague, Jr., P. 48 Randolph, James T., D. 69 Rapin's History of England, Int. 17 Rappahannock River, Va., blockaded, D. 73 Raymond, Henry J., speech at the Union meeting, N. Y. Doc. 100 Reagan, John H., postmaster-general Confederate States, Doc. 825 Rebels leave Washington, D. 47 Rebels, a poem, P. 66 Rebellion, a new way to settle it, P. 83 Reconstruction, P. 24 Rector, H. M., Gov. of Ark., D. 39, 43; reply to Lincoln, D. 101; P. 44 Rector, W. F., proclamation of, denying the authority of the Federal Government at Fort Smith, D. 92; Doc. 388 Redemption, by W. F. L., P. 104 Regiments in Buckram, P. 79 Reid, J. D., D. 35 Relay House, Md.
he President, but from the men preferred by the States they represented. There was no Secretary of the Interior in the Confederate Cabinet. Judah P. Benjamin, Secretary of State, has been called the brain of the Confederacy. President Davis wished to appoint the Honorable Robert Barnwell, Secretary of State, but Mr. Barnwell declined the honor. James A. Seddon Secretary of War. Christopher G. Memminger Secretary of the Treasury. Stephen R. Mallory Secretary of the Navy. John H. Reagan, Postmaster-General. Alexander H. Stephens vice-president. Judah P. Benjamin, Secretary of State. George Davis, Attorney-General. After the great mass meeting in Union square, New York, April 20, 1861 Knots of citizens still linger around the stands where Anderson, who had abandoned Sumter only six days before, had just roused the multitude to wild enthusiasm. Of this gathering in support of the Government the New York Herald said at the time: Such a mighty uprising of the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The last days of the Confederate Treasury and what became of its specie. (search)
ident appointed the Postmaster-General, Hon. John H. Reagan, acting Secretary of the Treasury, who wn when settlement can be regularly made. John H. Reagan, Acting Sec'y Treasury. [Indorsed.] Wawn when settlement can be regularly made. John H. Reagan, Sec'y of Treasury. Washington, Ga., Mipt subject to future regular settlement. John H. Reagan, Acting Secretary Treasury. M. H. Crawn when regular settlement can be made. John H. Reagan, Acting Secretary of Treasury. Washingtake his receipt and retain these papers. John H. Reagan, Acting Secretary Treasury. $1,500.Corps, taking receipt and retaining this. John H. Reagan, Acting Secretary Treasury. Receiveularly made; taking his receipt therefor. John H. Reagan, Acting Secretary Treasury. Washingtonrawn when regular settlement can be made. John H. Reagan, Acting Secretary Treasury. May 4, 1865senting I paid, with the concurrence of Hon. John H. Reagan, the acting Secretary of the Treasury, [13 more...]
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid, Chapter 17: (search)
apers, which General Johnston said were from Mr. Reagan, Postmaster-General. He and Breckinridge lo two, and found Messrs. Benjamin, Mallory, and Reagan with him. We had supposed that we were to be qion. General Breckinridge, Mr. Mallory, and Mr. Reagan, thought that the war was decided against us a half hour, when the memorandum written by Mr. Reagan was brought. I read this paper to General Ser to decide upon. Breckinridge and Postmaster-General Reagan immediately started for Johnston's ct with the one written by General Sherman with Reagan's before him, it will be sees that Johnston isin North Carolina, both present. I. (See 6, Reagan's draft.) The contending armies now in tie fieay forty-eight hours, allowed. II. (See 1, Reagan.) The Confederate armies now in existence to bnstitution and laws of Congress. V. (See 4, Reagan.) The people and inhabitants of all States to nd of the States respectively. VI. (See 5, Reagan.) The Executive authority of the Government of[12 more...]
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid, Chapter 18: (search)
members of Lincoln's Cabinet did. It has already been made to appear that Mr. Reagan, the Confederate Postmaster-General; Mr. Breckinridge, Secretary--of War; Wadman. Up to that time no draft of terms had been prepared by either side, and Mr. Reagan thereupon drew up outlines, based upon Johnston's conversations with Sherman,o, and did not differ in its most important points from the draft prepared by Mr. Reagan. The latter, therefore, was well qualified to inform Mr. Davis of the char the questions General Sherman has raised, is as follows: Views of Postmaster-General Reagan: Charlotte, N. C., April 22, 1865. To the President. Sirnqueror. I am, with great respect, your Excellency's obedient servant, John H. Reagan, Postmaster-General. It will be seen that Mr. Reagan, whose opportunMr. Reagan, whose opportunities for being well informed were excellent, looked upon the Sherman terms as preliminary, and held, as Mr. Stanton said our Cabinet did, that subsequently a claim m
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