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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 5: (search)
s is to excite and enlarge the faculties, and form deep and thorough thinkers. Never was this so completely and so generally effected as it now is in Germany; and, as the object is attained, why should we complain or regret that it is not done by the means which we have usually considered indispensable? As to the peculiar character of these metaphysics, you will get all the information necessary from Mad. de Stael. They are undoubtedly very different from the metaphysics taught by Locke, Reid, and Stewart. The Germans reproach the English with treating such subjects psychologically, or, in other words, not sufficiently distinguishing the difference between ideas and sensations; and the English reply that the Germans are unintelligible idealists. The difference between the two is very great, and, moreover, it is, I think, a natural and constitutional difference. In England, from the character of the people and the nature of the government, which for a thousand years have been
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 21: (search)
esent, and asked acute questions. I was, however, most curious about Shiel, the Irish agitator; a short, thick-set, fiery-faced little fellow, who carried all the marks of his spirit in the eagerness of his countenance and manner, and in the rapidity and vehemence of his utterance.—They all treated me with the greatest courtesy and kindness, evidently desirous only to get facts. . . . . The examinations are very skilfully and very fairly conducted, if these are specimens. We dined with Mrs. Reid; A lady of fortune and radical opinions, who gave her time and money to the service of the poor, in a truly Christian spirit. She kept open a library and reading-room for them, at her own expense. . . . . . the dinner was more than commonly agreeable. Dr. Roget was there, the Secretary of the Royal Society and author of one of the Bridgewater Treatises, a first-rate man; Dr. Bostock, a leading member of the Royal Society; Mr. Hogg, who is about publishing his Travels in the East, and
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 26 (search)
lion. Josiah, 339, 345, 368. Quincy, Mrs. J., 345. R Raczynski, Count, 495, 501. Ralston, Mr., 278 note. Rancliffe, Baroness, 458, 459. Randall, Miss, 312 and note. Randohr, 175. Randolph, Colonel, 35. Randolph, John, of Roanoke, 15, 16, 27, 381. Randolph, Mrs., 35, 348. Randolph, T. J. and Ellen, 35, 37, 348. Rauch, Christian, 495. Recamier, Mad., 137, 304. Recke, Frau von der, 474. Rees, Dr., 55. Regina, Duke de, 446. Reichenbach, H. T. L., 475, 482. Reid, Mrs., 415 and note. Retzsch, Moritz, 466, 474, 476, 484, 490. Reynolds, Dr., Edward, 154. Richelieu, Due de, 143, 145, 253, 262. Richmond, Va., visits, 12, 33. Riemer, Professor, 115, 116. Rigaud, Professor, 422. Rilliet, Mad., 152. Rivas, Duchess de, 207. Rivas, Duke de, 225, 227. Robinson, Henry Crabbe, 411. Robinson, Professor, 422. Rocca, M. de, 138. Rochefoucauld, Due de la, 256. Rockingham, Marquess of, 440, 441. Rogers, Samuel, 406, 410 and note, 412 note, 414, 430
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 30 (search)
d Ellen, I. 35, 37, 348. Ranke, Professor, II. 332. Rauch, Christian, I. 495, II. 341, 412 and note. Rauzan, Due de, II. 128. Rauzan, Duchesse de, II. 125, 130, 137, 348, 355, 356. Rawlinson, Colonel (Sir H.), II. 375, 378. Raymond, Rev. Dr., II. 145. Raynouard, I. 252, II. 487. Recamier, Madame, I. 137, 304. Recke, Frau von der, I. 474. Reed, II. 181. Rees, Dr , I. 55. Reeve, Henry, II. 369. Regina, Duke de, I. 446. Reichenbach, H T. L., I. 475, 482. Reid, Mrs., I. 415 and note. Remusat, C. F. M., Count de, II. 131, 137. Retzsch, Moritz, I. 466, 474, 476, 484, 490. Reumont, Baron Alfred von, II. 315, 339. Reviews and minor writings, list of, II. 507. Reynolds, Dr., Edward, I. 154. Rich, Obadiah, it. 245 and note, 249. Richardson, it. 306. Richelieu, Due de, T. 143, 144, 145, 253, 262. Richmond, Virginia, visits, I. 12, 33. Riemer, Professor, I. 115, 116. Rigaud, Professor, I. 422. Rignano, Duca di, II. 346. Rignano,
e suffered for a whole year before recovering. A still more remarkable case was that of Captain Charles Knowlton, Tenth Louisiana Regiment. He was wounded in the knee in November, 1863, and was at once invited to the Refuge, but, having recession of the knee, was compelled to remain under surgical treatment until April, 1864, when he was sent to Mrs. Caldwell, and remained nine months more under her care. An order had been issued that in all such cases amputation should be performed, but Dr. Reid, of Richmond, his attendant surgeon, decided to attempt to save the limb, and was successful. Out of many cases of the kind, this was the only one recorded where amputation was avoided and the patient's life was saved. Captain Knowlton now resides near Hopevilla, East Baton Rouge, Louisiana, is married, and has two children. Another desperate case was that of John McCormick, from whose leg nearly all the bones were removed, but who also recovered. There were, besides, three men sic
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
winter quarters on Harpeth's frozen banks, where Rosecrans so rudely disturbed us at Christmas eve. Murfreesboro follows and Vaught commands, and whether supporting Hardee's crushing blow upon the enemy's right, or holding the pivot of the position, or rushing madly in that deadly charge, when Breckinridge, in grand array and stern devotion, dashed for those heights across Stone river, the Washington Artillery won on that field the highest praise that soldiers could expect; and Anthony and Reid are left to mark its passage. Vicksburg is sore beset, and Johnston calls and Breckinridge is going, and the Fifth Company asks to follow. Mobile, in passing, gives us new recruits, as rushing through we hurry on to Jackson. But Vicksburg falls 'ere we can cross the Big Black, and Sherman tries to intercept, but strikes us only in our works at Jackson. Four stands of colors lie amid a thousand killed and wounded before the muzzles of Cook's and Slocomb's guns. Bragg calls in turn and B
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Washington Artillery in the Army of Tennessee. (search)
winter quarters on Harpeth's frozen banks, where Rosecrans so rudely disturbed us at Christmas eve. Murfreesboro follows and Vaught commands, and whether supporting Hardee's crushing blow upon the enemy's right, or holding the pivot of the position, or rushing madly in that deadly charge, when Breckinridge, in grand array and stern devotion, dashed for those heights across Stone river, the Washington Artillery won on that field the highest praise that soldiers could expect; and Anthony and Reid are left to mark its passage. Vicksburg is sore beset, and Johnston calls and Breckinridge is going, and the Fifth Company asks to follow. Mobile, in passing, gives us new recruits, as rushing through we hurry on to Jackson. But Vicksburg falls 'ere we can cross the Big Black, and Sherman tries to intercept, but strikes us only in our works at Jackson. Four stands of colors lie amid a thousand killed and wounded before the muzzles of Cook's and Slocomb's guns. Bragg calls in turn and B
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Last days of the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
pril 6th, when Ewell and Anderson's commands were captured, and when Gordon, after engaging in a running fight for nearly fourteen miles, was driven across Sailor's Creek, Lee lost about eight thousand men, including stragglers, who were not captured. The cavalry was constantly fighting for the protection of the wagon trains, and so was a portion of the infantry after the army left Amelia Courthouse. There was also the action at Sutherland's Station, April 2d; that at High Bridge, in which Reid's force was captured, and the fighting around Farmville, including the repulse of Humphreys, the affair in which General Gregg was captured, and also the action on the 9th at the Courthouse. The losses in all the actions which took place after the retreat was begun amounted to at least 12,000 men, and subtracting that number from the force with which Lee left the Petersburg lines, would leave about 24,000 men of all arms to be accounted for at Appomattox, exclusive for the force for Richmond
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Confederate dead in Stonewall Cemetery, Winchester, Va. Memorial services, June 6, 1894. (search)
oken down horses, with repeated assaults upon a greatly superior foe. broke it with the sabre, for several miles strewing the road with Federal dead. Among the band of heroes rode Thomson, and well I remember, in the forefront he rode. He, next day, though disabled by a wound in the arm, fought his last battle. The Pitch field was near High Bridge, over which a part of Lee's army expected to cross the Appomattox. A picked body of Federal cavalry and infantry under Colonel Washburn and General Reid were sent to destroy it. The morning after the fight at Jetersville Major Thomson fell in with the column of Mahone's Division, to which I was attached. He was pale and feeble and much depressed over the situation of our army. When he was about to leave me to rejoin his command, I said: Remember, if you go into a fight in your present condition, it will be suicide. After riding a few paces, he turned back and said, in the saddest tones, I do not wish to survive the Confederacy. Say
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.24 (search)
Surgeon, appointed by Secretary of War, Dec., to rank from July 21, ‘62. Dec. 30, Cleveland, Tenn. April 30, ‘63, in charge, Cleveland, Tenn. Sept. 17, ‘63, Marietta, Ga. Oct. 15, ‘63, ordered to report to Medical-Director Stout, by Medical-Director A. T. Reynolds, J. D., Assistant Surgeon. Nov. 26, ‘62, resignation accepted. read, A. H., contract $80, made by John M. Johnson, July 17, ‘62. Dec. 31, ‘62, Atlanta. Jan. 31, ‘63, Provost Battalion, Atlanta, Ga. Feb. 13, ‘63, cancelled. Reid, Thos. J., Assistant Surgeon, appointed by Secretary of War to rank July 24, ‘62. Dec. 31, ‘62, 32nd Tennessee Regiment. Passed Board, Tupelo, July 24, ‘62. Dec. 31, ‘62, 32nd Tennessee Regiment. Reeves, C. S., Assistant Surgeon, appointed by Secretary of War to rank July 14, ‘62. Jan. 31, ‘63, 34th Alabama Regiment. April 14, ‘63, resignation accepted. Reese, W. P., Surgeon. Feb. 17, ‘63, ordered to report to Medical-Director Flewellen, Tullahoma, Tenn., b
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