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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, An excellent treatise of the kingdome of China , and of the estate and government thereof: Printed in Latine at Macao a citie of the Portugals in China , An. Dom. 1590. and written Dialogue-wise. The speakers are Linus, Leo, and Michael. (search)
An excellent treatise of the kingdome of China , and of the estate and government thereof: Printed ind Michael. LINUS. Concerning the kingdome of China (Michael´╝ë which is our next neighbour, we haveable wall reported of, wherewith the people of China doe represse and drive backe the Tartars attemthere were so much gossipine or cotton-wool in China ; whereof such variety of clothes are made like will intreat of the tranquillity and peace of China , after I have spoken a word or two concerning ost diligently practised by the inhabitants of China : for (as we have before signified in the thirdroyall scepter. Albeit therefore the people of China (especially they that inhabit Southerly from tirected. Whereas therefore, in the kingdome of China , one onely king beares rule over so many provis a transgressour of the lawes and customes of China : which accident (as it is recorded) in ancienis doctrine doe all they embrace, which are in China called Cen, but with us at Japon are named Bo[48 more...]
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A briefe relation of the great magnificence and rich traffike of the kingdome of Pegu beyond the East India, written by Frey Peter of Lisbon, to his cousin Frey Diego of Lisbon, from Cochin. (search)
r Portugals which are here in this realme are woorse people then the Gentiles. I preached divers times among those heathen people; but being obstinate they say, that as their fathers beleeved so they will beleeve : for if their forefathers went to the devill so they will. Whereupon I returned backe againe to our monastery to certifie our father provinciall of the estate of this New found countrey. It is the best and richest countrey in all this East India; and it is thought to be richer then China . I am afrayd that the warres which his Majesty hath with England will be the utter undoing and spoile of Spaine: for these countreys likewise are almost spoiled with civill warres, which the Moores have against the Gentiles: for the kings here are up in armes all the countrey over. Here is an Indian which is counted a Prophet, which hath prophesied that there will a Dragon arise in a strange countrey, which will do great hurt to Spaine. How it will fall out, onely God doth know. And thus
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A voyage with three tall ships, the Penelope Admirall, the Marchant royall Viceadmirall, and the Edward Bonaventure Rereadmirall, to the East Indies, by the Cape of Buona Speransa, to Quitangone neere Mosambique, to the Iles of Comoro and Zanzibar on the backeside of Africa , and beyond Cape Comori in India, to the lies of Nicubar and of Gomes Polo within two leagues of Sumatra, to the Ilands of Pulo Pinaom, and thence to the maine land of Malacca, begunne by M. George Raymond, in the yeere 1591, and performed by M. James Lancaster, and written from the mouth of Edmund Barker of Ipswich, his lieutenant in the sayd voyage, by M. Richard Hakluyt. (search)
f and on for such ships as should have passed from Zeilan, Sant Tome, Bengala, Pegu , Malacca, the Moluccos, the coast of China , and the Ile of Japan, which ships are of exceeding wealth and riches. But in our course we were very much deceived by ths Northward of the citie of Malacca, to which Ilands the Portugals must needs come from Goa or S. Thome, for the Malucos, China , and Japan . And when wee were there arrived, we lay too and agayne for such shipping as should come that way. Thus havals they finde by diving for them in the Sea, which were lost not long before in two Portugall ships which were bound for China and were cast away there. They call in their language the Coco Calambe, the Plantane Pison, a Hen Jam, a Fish Iccan, a We understood in the East Indies by certaine Portugales which we tooke, that they have lately discovered the coast of China to the latitude of nine and fiftie degrees, finding the sea still open to the Northward: giving great hope of the Northea
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voiage of the right honorable George Erle of Cumberland to the Azores , &c. Written by the excellent Mathematician and Enginier master Edward Wright. (search)
great pieces of our Ordinance at her, she stroke sayle, and approching neerer, we asking of whence they were, they answered from the West-Indies, from Mexico, and Saint John de Lowe (truely called Ulhua.) This ship was of some three or foure hundred tunnes, and had in her seven hundred hides worth tenne shillings a peece: sixe chests of Cochinell, every chest houlding one hundred pound weight, and every pound worth sixe and twentie shillings and eight pence, and certaine chests of Sugar and China dishes, with some plate and silver. The Captaine of her was an Italian, and by his behaviour seemed to be a grave, wise, and civill man: he had put an adventure in this shippe five and twentie thousand Duckats. Wee tooke him with certaine other of her chiefest men (which were Spaniards) into the Victorie: and Captaine Lister with so manie other of the chiefest of our Mariners, souldiers, and saylers as were thought sufficient, to the number of 20. or there abouts, were sent into her. In
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A true report of the honourable service at Sea perfourmed by Sir John Burrough Knight, Lieutenant generall of the fleet prepared by the honor. Sir Walter Ralegh Knight, Lord warden of the Stanneries of Cornwall and Devon . Wherin chiefly the Santa Clara of Biscay, a ship of 600 tunnes was taken, and the two East Indian caraks, the Santa Cruz and the Madre de Dios were forced, the one burnt, and the other taken and brought into Dartmouth the seventh of September, 1592. (search)
re pepper, cloves, maces, nutmegs, cinamom, greene ginger: the drugs were benjamim, frankincense, galingale, mirabolans, aloes zocotrina, camphire: the silks, damasks, taffatas, sarcenets, altobassos, that is, counterfeit cloth of gold, unwrought China silke, sleaved silke, white twisted sike, curled cypresse. The calicos were book-calicos, calico launes, broad white calicos, fine starched calicos, course white calicos, browne broad calicos, browne course calicos. There were also canopies, andls, quilts of course sarcenet and of calico, carpets like those of Turky; wherunto are to be added the pearle, muske, civet, and amber-griece. The rest of the wares were many in number, but lesse in value; as elephants teeth, porcellan vessels of China , coco-nuts, hides, ebenwood as blacke as jet, bedsteds of the same, cloth of the rindes of trees very strange for the matter, and artificiall in workemanship. All which piles of commodities being by men of approved judgement rated but in reasonab
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The English Voyages, Navigations, and Discoveries (intended for the finding of a North-west passage) to the North parts of America, to Meta incognita, and the backeside of Gronland , as farre as 72 degrees and 12 minuts: performed first by Sebastian Cabota, and since by Sir Martin Frobisher, and M. John Davis, with the Patents, Discourses, and Advertisements thereto belonging. (search)
the North side of America , to goe to Cataia, China , and to the East India. Mar del Sur, and so trending by the Moluccae, China , and C. de buona Speranca, maintaineth it selfeas. Of a law denying all Aliens to enter into China , and forbidding all the inhabiters under a greof pepper to be brought into Canton, a port in China . The great and dangerous piracie used in thoseinually up and downe that reach from Japan to China , from China to Malacca, from Malacca to the MChina to Malacca, from Malacca to the Moluccaes: and shall an Englishman, better appointed then any of them all (that I say no more of our , for the search of the straight or passage to China , written by Christopher Hall, Master in the Ga for the discovery of a new passage to Cataya, China and the East India, by the Northwest. Ann. Domvoureth and laboureth, that the Passage unto China and the Iles of the Moluccas, by the Northwest to the Isles of the Moluccas, or the coast of China , in the yeere 1587. Written by M. John Janes. [4 more...]
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A discourse written by Sir Humphrey Gilbert Knight, to prove a passage by the Northwest to Cathaia, and the East Indies. (search)
the Northwest to Cathaia, and the East Indies. The Table of the matters in every Chapter of this discourse. Capitulo 1. To prove by authoritie a passage to be on the North side of America , to goe to Cataia, China , and to the East India. Capitulo 2. To prove by reason a passage to be on the North side of America , to goe to Cataia, Moluccae, &c. Capitulo 3. To prove by experience ofnd, Lappia, &c. and found by Bernard de la Torre in Mar del Sur, on the backeside of America : therefore this current (having none other passage) must of necessity, fall out thorow this our fret into Mar del Sur, and so trending by the Moluccae, China , and C. de buona Speranca, maintaineth it selfe by circular motion, which is all one in nature, with Motus ab Oriente in Occidentem. So that it seemeth, we have now more occasion to doubt of our returne, then whether there be a passage that wa
he fret of Magellan, and wanting sufficient entrance there, by narrownes of the straite, is by the necessitie of natures force, brought to Terra de Labrador, where Jaques Cartier met the same, and thence certainly knowen, not to strike over upon Island, Lappia, &c. and found by Bernard de la Torre in Mar del Sur, on the backeside of America : therefore this current (having none other passage) must of necessity, fall out thorow this our fret into Mar del Sur, and so trending by the Moluccae, China , and C. de buona Speranca, maintaineth it selfe by circular motion, which is all one in nature, with Motus ab Oriente in Occidentem. So that it seemeth, we have now more occasion to doubt of our returne, then whether there be a passage that way, yea or no: which doubt, hereafter shall be sufficiently remooved. Wherefore, in mine opinion, reason it self, grounded upon experience, assureth us of this passage, if there were nothing els to put us in hope thereof. But least these might not
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Certaine other reasons, or arguments to proove a passage by the Northwest, learnedly written by M. Richard Willes Gentleman. (search)
e Molucca spices and pearle for piracie in those Seas. Of a law denying all Aliens to enter into China , and forbidding all the inhabiters under a great penaltie to let in any stranger into those counained with a Barbarian Merchant for a great summe of pepper to be brought into Canton, a port in China . The great and dangerous piracie used in those Seas no man can be ignorant of, that listeth to r some of them were put to the sword, the rest were scattered abroad: at Fuquien a great citie in China , certaine of them are yet this day to be seene. As for the Japans they be most desirous to be acortingals, the Saracenes, and Moores travaile continually up and downe that reach from Japan to China , from China to Malacca, from Malacca to the Moluccaes: and shall an Englishman, better appointeChina to Malacca, from Malacca to the Moluccaes: and shall an Englishman, better appointed then any of them all (that I say no more of our Navie) feare to saile in that Ocean? What seas at all doe want piracie? what Navigation is there voyde of perill? To the last argument. Our travail
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The first Voyage of M. Martine Frobisher, to the Northwest, for the search of the straight or passage to China , written by Christopher Hall, Master in the Gabriel, and made in the yeere of our Lord 1576. (search)
The first Voyage of M. Martine Frobisher, to the Northwest, for the search of the straight or passage to China , written by Christopher Hall, Master in the Gabriel, and made in the yeere of our Lord 1576. THE 7. of June being Thursday, the two Barks, viz. the Gabriel, and the Michael & our Pinnesse set saile at Ratcliffe, and bare down to Detford, and there we ancred: the cause was, that our Pinnesse burst her boultsprit, and foremast aboard of a ship that rode at Detford, else wee meant to have past that day by the Court then at Grenewich. The 8. day being Friday, about 12 of the clocke we wayed at Detford, and set saile all three of us, and bare downe by the Court, where we shotte off our ordinance and made the best shew we could: Her Majestie beholding the same, commended it, and bade us farewell, with shaking her hand at us out of the window. Afterward shee sent a Gentleman aboord of us, who declared that her Majestie had good liking of our doings, and thanked us for it, and al
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