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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 2 0 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 2 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, A book of American explorers 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 7, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 1 1 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Montreal, massacre at (search)
forward subsistence for the march. Colonel Schuyler with a party of Mohawks, the van of the expedition, pushed forward towards the St. Lawrence, but was repulsed by Frontenac (August). The remainder of the troops did not proceed farther than Lake George, where they were stopped by a deficiency of provisions and the prevalence of the smallpox. Mutual recriminations followed, and Leisler actually caused Winthrop's arrest. The latter charged the failure to Milborne, who, it was alleged, had faors of the Five Nations and 1,000 palatines, chiefly from the Mohawk Valley, making the whole force about 4,000 strong. Nicholson was assisted by Colonels Schuyler, Whiting, and Ingoldsby, and on Aug. 28 they began their march for Canada. At Lake George, Nicholson heard of the miscarriage of the naval expedition, and returned to Albany, abandoning the enterprise. In 1775, when the republicans invaded Canada, General Carleton was in command of a few troops at Montreal. With about 800 men
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Putnam, Israel 1718- (search)
Putnam, Israel 1718- Military officer; born in Salem (the part now Danvers), Mass., Jan. 7, 1718; he settled in Pomfret, Conn., in 1739, where he acquired a good estate; raised a company, and served in the French and Indian War with so much efficiency that in 1757 he was promoted to the rank of major. While Abercrombie was resting Israel Putnam in 1776. securely in his intrenchments at Lake George after his repulse at Ticonderoga, two or three of his convoys had been cut off by French scouting-parties, and he sent out Majors Rogers and Putnam to intercept them. Apprised of this movement, Montcalm sent Molang, an active partisan, to waylay the English detachment. While marching through the forest (August, 1758), in three divisions, within a mile of Fort Anne, the left, led by Putnam, fell into an ambuscade of Indians, who attacked the English furiously, uttering horrid yells. Putnam and his men fought bravely. His fusee at length missed fire with the muzzle at the breast
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), St. Sacrament Lake, (search)
St. Sacrament Lake, A former name of Lake George; a beautiful sheet of water lying west of the upper end of Lake Champlain; originally named by Father Jogues, a Jesuit missionary who visited it about the middle of the seventeenth century. This lake was the theatre of important military events in the French and Indian War (q. v.) and the Revolutionary War. At the head of the lake Gen. Sir William Johnson was encamped early in September, 1755, with a body of provincial troops and a party ofand skill of Gen. Phineas Lyman. The assailants were repulsed, and their leader (Dieskau) was badly wounded, made prisoner, sent to New York, and paroled. He died of his wounds not long afterwards. Johnson was knighted, and gave the name of Lake George to the sheet of water, in honor of his sovereign, by which name it is still known. At its head Fort William Henry was built, and suffered siege and capture by the French and Indians in 1757. The next year it was the scene of a vast armament
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Schuyler, Philip (John) 1733-1857 (search)
Schuyler, Philip (John) 1733-1857 Military officer; born in Albany, N. Y., Nov. 22, 1733; inherited the whole of his father's estate, which he divided with his brothers and sisters, and also inherited from Col. Philip Schuyler the Saratoga estate, which he afterwards occupied. He was a captain of provincial troops at Fort Edward and Lake George in 1755, became a Philip (John) Schuyler. commissary in the army the same year, and held the office until 1763. In 1756 Col. John Bradstreet was sent by Shirley to provision the garrison at Oswego. With 200 provincial troops and forty companies of boatmen, he crossed the country from Albany, by way of the Mohawk River, Wood Creek, Oneida Lake, and the Oswego River, and placed in the fort provision for 5,000 troops for six months. He was accompanied by Schuyler, as chief commissary. His descent of the Oswego River had been observed by the French scouts, and when he had ascended that stream about 9 miles he was attacked by a strong p
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Seelye, Elizabeth Eggleston 1858- (search)
Seelye, Elizabeth Eggleston 1858- Author; born in St. Paul, Minn., Dec. 15, 1858; daughter of Edward Eggleston (q. v. ); received a private school education; was married to Elwyn Seelye in 1877, and settled near Lake George. She is the author of Tecumseh, Montezuma, Pocahontas (with Edward Eggleston) ; The story of Columbus; The story of Washington; Lake George in history; Saratoga and Lake Champlain in history, etc. Seelye, Elizabeth Eggleston 1858- Author; born in St. Paul, Minn., Dec. 15, 1858; daughter of Edward Eggleston (q. v. ); received a private school education; was married to Elwyn Seelye in 1877, and settled near Lake George. She is the author of Tecumseh, Montezuma, Pocahontas (with Edward Eggleston) ; The story of Columbus; The story of Washington; Lake George in history; Saratoga and Lake Champlain in history, etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Sumner, John 1735-1787 (search)
Sumner, John 1735-1787 Military officer; born in Middletown, Conn., May 1, 1735; commissioned captain in a regiment of foot in 1760, and fought in the battles of Lake George and Ticonderoga; was at the capture of Crown Point and the surrender of Montreal; served in the Revolutionary War till Jan. 1, 1781, taking part in the battles of Long Island, Harlem, White Plains, Germantown, Trenton, and Monmouth. He was one of the founders of the Society of the Cincinnati. He died in February, 1787.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Sylvester, Nathaniel Bartlett 1825- (search)
Sylvester, Nathaniel Bartlett 1825- Author; born in Denmark, N. Y., Feb. 22, 1825; was admitted to the bar in Oswego, N. Y., in 1852; engaged in journalism for several years. His publications include Historical sketches of Northern New York, and the Adirondack wilderness; History of Saratoga county, N. Y.; History of Rensselaer county, N. Y.; History of the Connecticut Valley in Massachusetts; History of Ulster county, N. Y.; Indian legends of Saratoga and the Upper Hudson Valley; and Historical narratives of the Upper Hudson, Lake George, and Lake Champlain.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Thompson, Zodoc 1796-1856 (search)
Thompson, Zodoc 1796-1856 Geologist; born in Bridgewater, Vt., May 23, 1796; graduated at the University of Vermont in 1823; removed to Canada in 1833; studied theology and was ordained in the Protestant Episcopal Church; became a professor in the Vermont Episcopal Seminary in 1837; was State geologist of Vermont in 1845-48; accepted the chair of Chemistry and Natural History in the University of Vermont in 1851. He was the author of Gazetteer of the State of Vermont; History of the State of Vermont to 1832; History of Vermont, natural, Civil, and statistical; Guide to Lake George, Lake Champlain, Montreal, and Quebec; Geography and Geology of Vermont, etc. He died in Burlington, Vt., Jan. 19, 1856.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ticonderoga, operations at (search)
ndians. General Abercrombie personally commanded the expedition designed to capture this fortress, and at the beginning of July he had assembled at the head of Lake George about 7,000 regulars, nearly 9,000 provincials, and a heavy train of artillery. Viscount George Augustus Howe, colonel of the 60th (Royal American) Regiment, aof the enemy's fire (July 8), when they were met by insuperable obstacles. After a bloody conflict of four hours, the assailants were compelled to fall back to Lake George, leaving about 2,000 men dead or wounded in the forest. Abercrombie then hastened to his camp at the head of the lake. The loss of the French was inconsiderabonderoga and other posts in the rear of the invaders. On Sept. 13, 1777, he detailed Col. John Brown with 500 men for the purpose. Brown landed at the foot of Lake George, and by quick movements surprised all the posts between that point and Fort Ticonderoga, 4 miles distant. He took possession of Mount Defiance and Mount Hope,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), William Henry, Fort, capture of (search)
William Henry, Fort, capture of Montcalm left Ticonderoga towards the close of July, 1757, with nearly 9,000 men, of whom about 2,000 were Indians, and moved against Fort William Henry, built by Sir William Johnson, at the head of Lake George. It was garrisoned by about 3,000 troops, under Colonel Munro, a brave English officer, who felt strong in his position because of the close proximity of 4,000 English troops, under General Webb, at Fort Edward, only 15 miles distant. Webb was Munro's commanding general. When Montcalm demanded (Aug. 1) the surrender of the post and garrison, the colonel refused, and sent an express to General Webb for aid. For six days Montcalm continued the siege, and daily expresses were sent to Webb asking aid, but none was furnished. One day General Johnson, with a corps of provincials and Putnam's Rangers, had marched a few miles in that direction, when they were recalled, and Webb sent a letter to Munro advising him to surrender. This letter was i
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