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Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 2 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 20, 1865., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas C. DeLeon, Four years in Rebel capitals: an inside view of life in the southern confederacy, from birth to death. 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 2 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 2 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
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and thirty-two pound shot and twenty-seven pound cartridges, to be used in firing one gun against the trunnion of another, left this ship at half-past 7 o'clock, the launch commanded by Lieut. Eastman and the expedition under command of Lieut. Maxwell, the executive officer of this ship. I despatched the tug Tempest to Capt. Chauncy, she drawing too much water to enter the sound. At ten o'clock the Susquehanna and tug started for the inlet. On the evening of the same day the tug and Susquehanna returned and anchored off Fort Clark. The tug came in next morning, and the pilot informed me that the force from the Susquehanna did not enter Ocracoke in consequence of the surf. On the afternoon of the 17th instant I felt much anxiety for our expedition. The Susquehanna remained at anchor in the offing, and our force was left to take care of itself. Early this morning the lookout at the mast-head gave us the gratifying intelligence that our expedition was in sight, and it reached
ly unprotected, an attack in this direction would have a most destructive effect upon the two garrisons. The second circuit was only performed by the Wabash, Susquehanna, and Bienville. The Bienville occupying the head of the starboard column, was necessarily nearer each of the forts than either of the other ships. Capt. Smicontrary, poured in upon the south battery a perfect shower of iron hail. The gunboats rendered excellent service, every shot almost telling, while the Wabash, Susquehanna, Pawnee, and Vandalia poured in most effective broadsides. About 1 o'clock P. M. a white flag was visible on shore. The firing then ceased, and the commodorhe sounding line, arranged in two columns, of which the first was led by the flag-ship, and the second by the Bienville. The first column comprised the Wabash, Susquehanna, Mohican, Seminole, Pawnee, Unadilla, Ottawa, Pembina, and Vandalia, in tow of the Isaac Smith. The gunboats Penguin, Augusta, Curlew, Seneca, and R. B. Forbes
nced the red fires, fast sped the hissing ball; Thick smokes, volcanic, hover'd like a pall, A dim, sulphurous vail; The Bay Point batteries, like a furnace, cast Their iron tempest in incessant blast; How might survive the crews, the spar, the mast, Before that fearful hail! XI. Yet all in vain! The star-flag still arose, Nailed to each mast, a target for its foes; The rough tars cheer, and on each frigate goes In undismay'd career; Stern Dupont leads his Wabash to the goal, And Pawnee, Susquehanna, Seminole, And stout Bienville their dread thunders roll, 'Mid shout and battle-cheer. XII. Stern Dupont, in that tempest's very midst, Through lurid flames, and the artillery's mist, Where crash'd the ball, and hurtling bullets hiss'd, The noble frigate led. For three long, bloody hours, he stubborn sto Environed by that fierce and fiery flood; While blush'd his decks with bubbling, loyal blood, With scuppers chok'd and red. XIII. Three times that triple dance he fearless led; Three ti
nding that it would not be prudent to attack the city of Savannah with the small force which Gen. Sherman had under his command, he determined to attack Fernandina, Florida, and Brunswick, Georgia. In conjunction with Commodore Du Pont he arranged the expedition, which left Hilton Head on the afternoon of February twenty-seventh and the morning of February twenty-eighth, and arrived at Warsaw Sound at twelve o'clock M. At evening they left Warsaw Sound in the following order: Wabash, Susquehanna, Florida, Flag, Ottawa, Seneca, Huron, Pembina, Isaac Smith, Penguin, Pawnee, James Adger, Potumska, Pocahontas, pilot-boat Hope, Seminole, Ellen, Alabama, Henrietta, Mohican, sailing ship Onward. Transports — Empire City, containing General Wright and staff, and the Fourth New-Hampshire regiment; Star of the South, Ninth Maine and towing schooner Sarah Cullen, having stores on board; Marion, towing schooner J. G. Steele, with army stores; Belvidere, having on board Hamilton's battery and tow
d the channel, and taken possession of Sewell's Point, and the Dacotah fired a shot towards Craney Island, which fell short. A second shot from the Dacotah struck on the beach at Sewell's Point. A third also fell short. 12.20 o'clock.--The Susquehanna moves up, and takes the lead of the San Jacinto and Seminole. There was no return from either of the rebel forts, and the Dacotah and Monitor are steaming up the Elizabeth River, the Naugatuck laying off towards the mouth of James River. 1he rebel out again. 5.45 o'clock.--For the past hour, the fleet has been moving back and forward, but the Merrimac still lies under the guns of Craney Island. The Monitor is lying about a mile and a half from the Merrimac, and the Dacotah, Susquehanna and Seminole are still in her rear. The Naugatuck is also running up towards the Monitor. The Minnesota, Arago and Vanderbilt have gone back to their anchorage, and there is no prospect of any fight to-night. 5 o'clock.--The war-vessels,
y, bereft of thee, So easy a prey, in an ill-starred hour, To some hostile giant ruling the sea? “We are here!” the Monitor's Children cry, And the voices are looming athwart the gloom: “Ne'er mother went down, to be raised so high-- Left such an example — so honored a tomb. “We are many. In us she lives, and more, As mother in stalwart and filial band; In her faith we have sworn, on sea and shore To fulfil her counsel — her loyal command. We are one--as our country must ever be-- In our heavenly trust and our glorious cause, Dealing death upon treason and tyranny, For Union, Liberty, Virtue, and Laws. “We are ready! All clad in our heaviest mail, Yet buoyant to breast the” heaviest “gale. We are ready! To pour our iron hail, Till inimical bulwarks tremble and fail-- Till Rebellion has uttered its dying wail, And tyrants,” admonished, “no more shall assail-- ’And the star-spangled banner in triumph shall wave O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave.‘”
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), First expeditions of the Federal Navy (search)
l F. Du Pont and Captain Charles H. Davis, of the navy; Alexander D. Bache, of the coast survey, and Major John G. Barnard, of the army. From their report, the Navy Department had organized and fitted out a squadron under the command of Flag-Officer Silas H. Stringham, which sailed under sealed orders on the 26th of August, 1861. It was composed of the Minnesota (flagship) under command of Captain G. J. Van Brunt; the Wabash, under command of Captain Samuel Mercer; the Monticello, the Susquehanna, the Pawnee, the Harriet Lane, and the Cumberland. In addition there were the chartered transport steamers Adelaide and George Peabody, and the ocean-going tug Fanny. These vessels had in tow a number of schooners and surf-boats to be used in landing a small body of troops, less than a thousand in number, that accompanied the expedition. The land force was under command of Major-General Benjamin F. Butler. It was soon known that the destination of the fleet was Hatteras Island, where F
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The blockade (search)
it briefly, although this intrepid exploit came as a thunderclap to the North, the great Federal armada had Commodore Gershom J. Van Brunt, U. S. N. The gallant commander of the Minnesota. He and his ship were early in the thick of things and served under Rear-Admiral Goldsborough at Hatteras Inlet. Made commodore July 16, 1862, Van Brunt was actively engaged in blockade duty during the rest of the war. Rear-Admiral James L. Lardner, U. S. N. In command of the steam frigate Susquehanna, he formed an active part of Admiral Du Pont's circle of fire at Port Royal, November 7, 1861. In 1862-3 he was in command of the East Gulf blockading squadron and in 1864 of the West Indian squadron. Rear-Admiral Charles Wilkes, U. S. N. A nephew of the celebrated John Wilkes of London, this officer in 1838-42 led the exploring expedition that discovered the Antarctic continent. In 1861 he obtained fame of another kind by seizing Mason and Slidell aboard the British steamer Trent
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Naval actions along the shore (search)
H. Stringham (afterwards rear-admiral) sailed from Hampton Roads in the first naval expedition of the war. It achieved the first victory for the Federal cause, capturing Forts Hatteras and Clark at Hatteras Inlet on August 29th. Commodore Stringham, a veteran of the old navy, had with him four of the old ships of live oak in which American officers and men had been wont to sail the seas; and the forts at Hatteras Inlet were no match for the 135 guns which the Minnesota (flagship), Wabash, Susquehanna, and Cumberland brought to bear upon them, to say nothing of the minor armament of the Pawnee, Harriet Lane, and Monticello. But before another naval expedition could be undertaken, many of the gallant officers had to come down from their staunch old ships to command nondescript vessels purchased for the emergency, whose seaworthiness was a grave question. Yet these brave men never inquired whether their vessels would sink or swim, caring only to reach the post of danger and serve as be
creeks forms a group of numerous islands. The parish of which these are the greater part constituted the richest agricultural district in the state, its staples being sea-island cotton and rice. The principal defenses were Fort Walker, a strong earthwork on Hilton Head, and Fort Beauregard on Philip's Island. The attack was made by the enemy on the 7th, by a fleet consisting of eight steamers and a sloop-of-war in tow. Some of the steamers were of the first class, as the Wabash and the Susquehanna. The conflict continued for four hours, when the forts, because untenable, were abandoned. In the early part of 1862 several reconnaissances were sent out from Port Royal, and subsequently an expedition visited Darien and Brunswick in Georgia, and Fernandina, Jacksonville, and St. Augustine in Florida. Its design was to take and keep under control this line of seacoast, especially in Georgia. Some small steamers and other vessels were captured, and some ports were occupied. The sy
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