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Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, XIV: return to Cambridge (search)
orious valley view was before us . . . . The poor town looked shabby and ruined by day; [but there were Turkey rugs and the rustle of silk gowns in the crumbling old house]. During the war they were here when only five families staid in the town. After eight all windows had to be darkened, otherwise the Union pickets fired on them from the Maryland heights and the rebels from the other side. There were bullet marks on the table. . .. We had a beautiful drive up the Shenandoah hills with Blue Ridge always in sight, amid large farms looking like Pennsylvania and very fertile. We went to Charlestown, eight miles, a flourishing village with nice houses and buildings. Here we saw the jail yard where John Brown was confined, the field where he was executed, the new court house on the site where he was tried, and most interesting of all, the very records of the trial of him and his men—the successive entries alternating with the commonest things. The road we came was that over which the
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac, Index. (search)
pture of garrison, 125. Gaines' Mill, map of battle of, 149; Magruder occupies McClellan's attention on south bank of Chickahominy, 151; Porter overwhelmed, and the retreat commenced, 152; French and Meagher cover Porter's retreat, 153; Porter's corps crosses to McClellan at night, 153; estimate of casualties, 153. Garnett, General, Confederate commander in West Virginia, 35. Gettysburg campaign, the, 308; theory of the Confederate invasion, 308; Berryville captured by Rodes, 317; Blue Ridge, passes occupied by Longstreet, 318; concentration of the army upon, 324; Lee's army countermarches towards, 326; approach of the two armies towards, 326; topography of the field, 329; the first day—Buford engaged with Hill's van, 328; error of covering too much ground, 333; Howard, General, faulty dispositions at Get. tysburg, 333; the Union centre pierced by Rodes—the troops fall back through Gettysburg, 334; Gettysburg Ridge, the position at, 335; Hancock arrests flight of First and Ele
in altitude it rises from an average of nearly 400 feet along its Midland border to one of nearly 1,000 feet along its Blue ridge border, while its included mountain ranges and Blue ridge spurs vary in altitude from 1,000 to 4,000 feet. It is a genuBlue ridge spurs vary in altitude from 1,000 to 4,000 feet. It is a genuine piedmont, or foot-of-mountain country, that extends for a distance of over 300 miles along the eastern side of the Blue ridge from the Potomac to the North Carolina line, with an average breadth of nearly 25 miles. Its greatly varying forms of reation from about 1,000 feet near the Potomac to over 4,000 feet in the plateau in the southwest, on which are the three Blue ridge counties of the State. This is not only a striking feature in the landscape, from both its eastern and its western sida-lachia, where are broad areas over 4,000 feet above the sea level, and to the still higher ridges of the southwestern Blue ridge and of western Appalachia, where flourish the pines, the balsams and the larches of the cool-tem perate regions of the
but one. The distribution of slaveholders, slaves and free negroes among the seven natural grand divisions of Virginia in 1860, is suggestively presented in the following table, showing numbers of slaveholders and of negroes (slave and free) in Virginia in 1860, by grand divisions of the State, and number of counties in each grand division: Counties.Slaveholders.Slaves.Free Negroes. 1.Tidewater,30114,862149,01828,646 2.Midland,2517,841190,48915,746 3.Piedmont,149,18288,6905,206 4.Blue Ridge,33311,28499 5.The Valley,176,23541,3765,803 6.Appalachia,182,44413,2111,465 7.Trans-Appal'a,411,5226,7971,081 ————————— Totals, 148152,128490,86557,374 The following table presents the same facts for the portions of the State in 1860 that were organized into the State of West Virginia, December 3, 1862, and admitted into the Union as a State, June 19, 1863: Counties.Slaveholders.Slaves.Free Negroes. 1.The Valley,29675,610797 2. Appalachia,91,1326,060922 3. Trans-A
be necessary to successfully invest and secure possession of it. Therefore, with good reason, Lee had taken Jackson into his councils and provided to put in his hands the execution of the plan of campaign decided on. Harper's Ferry, located in the fork at the junction of the Shenandoah and the Potomac, just above where the united rivers break through the Blue ridge, cannot be held and defended unless Loudoun heights on the south, across the Shenandoah, the northeastern end of the double Blue ridge, and Maryland heights, across the Potomac, the southwestern end of the Blue ridge in Maryland, are both occupied and defended at the same time; for each of these positions overlooks and thoroughly commands the fronts and flanks of the defenses of Harper's Ferry proper. The Federals had not occupied Loudoun heights, but they had Maryland heights, with formidable batteries placed to command the approaches to Harper's Ferry from Virginia, and with defensive works to protect in the rear from
to form themselves into new Confederacies, probably four. All the lines of demarcation between the new Unions cannot be accurately drawn in advance, but many of them approximately may. Thus, looking to natural boundaries and commercial affinities, some of the following frontiers, after many waverings and conflicts, might perhaps become acknowledged and fixed: 1. The Potomac River and the Chesapeake Bay to the Atlantic. 2. From Maryland, along the crest of the Alleghany (perhaps the Blue Ridge) range of mountains, to some point on the coast of Florida. 3. The line from say the head of the Potomac to the west or northwest, which it will be most difficult to settle. 4. The crest of the Rocky Mountains. The Southeast Confederacy would, in all human probability, in less than five years after the rupture, find itself bounded by the first and second lines indicated above, the Atlantic, and the Gulf of Mexico, with its capital at say Columbia, South Carolina. The country between
had the wonderful impetus of flight, with the chance of safety and something like success before him as his prize. He, besides, was moving towards supplies, while Grant must leave his base, and rebuild a railroad in order to provision his army. There was every military chance, when Lee fled from Petersburg, that he would succeed in eluding his pursuer. The intention was to take the direction of Danville, and turn to our advantage the good line for resistance offered by the Dan and Staunton rivers. The activity of the Federal cavalry and the want of supplies compelled a different course.—Four Years with General Lee. Accordingly he ordered supplies from Danville to meet him, and by daylight on the 3rd of April his advance was sixteen miles on the road to Amelia. And now came a contest between the wits and genius of the two commanders. For the first time they were pitted against each other, absolutely out. side of works, and in the open field. Lee no longer had elaborate fort
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
that he made this song at Oakland, Alleghany Co. Md., to the tune of the guns of Antietam, which he could hear as he wrote. Dr. Palmer is a native of Baltimore, and a writer of no mean repute, and his letter seems to settle the authorship. He gives the following as the original and correct version of the song.] Come, stack arms, men; pile on the rails; Stir up the camp fire bright! No growling if the canteen fails; We'll make a roaring night. Here Shenandoah brawls along, There burly Blue Ridge echoes strong- To swell the brigade's rousing song Of Stonewall Jackson's way. We see him now; that queer slouched hat Cocked o'er his eye askew; The shrewd, dry smile, the speech so pat, So calm, so blunt, so true! The Blue-light Elder knows them well; Says he: “That's Banks: he's fond of shell. Lord save his soul! we'll give him” —Well! That's Stonewall Jackson's way. Silence! Ground arms! Kneel all! Caps off! Ole massa's goina to pray. Strangle the fool! that dares to scoff; Atte<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Stonewall Jackson's way. (search)
that he made this song at Oakland, Alleghany Co. Md., to the tune of the guns of Antietam, which he could hear as he wrote. Dr. Palmer is a native of Baltimore, and a writer of no mean repute, and his letter seems to settle the authorship. He gives the following as the original and correct version of the song.] Come, stack arms, men; pile on the rails; Stir up the camp fire bright! No growling if the canteen fails; We'll make a roaring night. Here Shenandoah brawls along, There burly Blue Ridge echoes strong- To swell the brigade's rousing song Of Stonewall Jackson's way. We see him now; that queer slouched hat Cocked o'er his eye askew; The shrewd, dry smile, the speech so pat, So calm, so blunt, so true! The Blue-light Elder knows them well; Says he: “That's Banks: he's fond of shell. Lord save his soul! we'll give him” —Well! That's Stonewall Jackson's way. Silence! Ground arms! Kneel all! Caps off! Ole massa's goina to pray. Strangle the fool! that dares to scoff; Atte<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reunion of the Virginia division army of Northern Virginia Association (search)
he Shenandoah empties into the Potomac. At the confluence of the two rivers is Harpers Ferry. It is dominated on the Maryland side by the southern terminus of Elk Ridge, called Maryland Heights, and on the Virginia side by the northern end of Blue Ridge, known as Loudoun Heights. Harpers Ferry is, of itself, a cul de sac, indefensible against the dominating heights on either side. Both Loudoun Heights and Maryland Heights are accessible from the rear by roads, and can be carried by a determinlovely view. Middletown Valley, rich in orchards, farm houses, barns, and flocks and herds spread before you, down to the Potomac and Virginia on the left, and up to Mason and Dixon's line and Pennsylvania on the right. The South Mountain, or Blue Ridge, stretches out, a wall of green on the western side of this Elysian scene, while Catoctin forms its eastern bounds. From Hagans the gap at Harpers Ferry is plainly visible. With a good glass you can see through it to the line and hills beyond
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