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J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 1 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 1 1 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
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e Colonel and B. had just gone. Shall we ever meet again? Many ladies were now upon the streets. The lower part of the city was burning. About seven o'clock I set off to go to the central depot to see if the cars would go out. As I went from Franklin to Broad Street, and on Broad, the pavements were covered with broken glass; women, both white and coloured, were walking in multitudes from the Commissary offices and burning stores with bags of flour, meal, coffee, sugar, rolls of cotton clothThe Commissary Department, with our desks and papers, was consumed already. Warwick & Barksdale's mill was sending its flames to the sky. Cary and Main Streets seemed doomed throughout; Bank Street was beginning to burn, and now it had reached Franklin. At any other moment it would have distracted me, but I had ceased to feel any thing. We brought our guard to Colonel P., who posted him; about three o'clock he came to tell me that the guard was drunk, and threatening to shoot the servants in
May 8. Nine Union regiments, under Generals Milroy and Schenck, fought fourteen thousand rebels, under General Jackson, at McDowell, in Virginia, from six till nine P. M., when they fell back to the town of Franklin in good order. (Doc. 10.) The bombardment of the rebel batteries on Sewell's Point and Craney Island was actively carried forward by the Monitor, the Naugatuck, and other vessels of the fleet. The Merrimac finally appeared, but as she evinced a disinclination to come out into the roadstead, and the National vessels were equally disinclined to go up to her, the combat ceased. The scene was an exciting one for some time, and was witnessed by President Lincoln and Secretary Stanton.--(Doc. 26.) Messrs. Richardson, Knapp, and Robinson, of Illinois; Law and Voorhees, of Indiana; Allen, White, Noble, Pendleton, Morris, and Vallandigham, of Ohio; Johnson and Ancona, of Pennsylvania, and Shields of Oregon, issued an address to the Democracy of the United States,
in that State or its borders to the lawless and fiendish proclamation of President Lincoln to liberate the slaves.--Richmond Dispatch, October 4. This morning a fight took place along the banks of the Blackwater River, in the vicinity of Franklin, Va., between three Union gunboats, Commodore Perry, Hunchback, and Whitehead, under the command of Capt. Flusser, and a force of rebel troops nearly nine thousand strong, resulting, after an engagement of six hours duration, in the killing and wourned. A reconnoitring expedition, consisting of three regiments of infantry, a regiment of cavalry, and a battery of artillery, under the command of Acting Brig.-Gen. Spear, left Suffolk, Va., and proceeded to the Blackwater River opposite Franklin, where the rebels were discovered in considerable force. An artillery fight ensued, resulting in the retreat of the rebels with a loss of about thirty killed and sixty wounded. The Nationals then returned to camp.--National Intelligencer, Octob
October 31. The town of Franklin, on the Blackwater River,Virginia, was this day shelled by three batteries of Union artillery, and partially destroyed, the rebel forces being driven off with great loss.--An enthusiastic meeting was held at Key West, Florida, to raise funds for the relief of the families of volunteers in the Union army. One thousand dollars were collected. James R. Lackland, charged with encouragement of the rebellion, by publicly opposing the national government, was arrested at St. Louis, Mo.--Between three and four hundred East-Tennesseans arrived at Lexington, Ky., with the intention of joining the Union army.--A rebel force of cavalry under General Stuart, attacked a small force of Union calvary stationed at Maysville, Va., and drove them toward Aldie. The rebels under General Hindman having committed depredation upon Union citizens residing in the vicinity of Helena, Ark., the national troops retaliated on rebel sympathizers, and destroyed a n
al Mercer one fifth of their negroes, in order to complete the for-tifications around Savannah. If they were not sent in, General Mercer was authorized to impress whatever number he required for that purpose.--(Doc. 22.) The rebel schooner Adventurer, laden with salt, leather, etc., was captured by the United States steamer Kensington, in the vicinity of Mermanteau Pass, La.--Major-General Peck, from his headquarters at Suffolk, Va., issued a general order denouncing pillage, and calling upon his forces to cooperate with him in bringing the guilty to a speedy trial.--The Richmond Whig of this date opposes the rebel conscription law as unpopular, if not odious, among a large class of the people. A National force composed of the First Mounted Riflemen, N. Y. S. V., Follett's battery, the Eleventh cavalry of Pennsylvania volunteers, and General Wessell's brigade, visited Franklin, Va., to-day, and succeeded in driving the rebels from the town with some loss.--New York Tribune.
December 2. Abbeville, Miss., was evacuated by the rebels, and occupied by the National cavalry alry belonging to the army of General Grant.--A fight took place near Franklin, Va., between a force of Union troops, under the command of Colonel Spear, Eleventh Pennsylvania cavalry, and a body of rebel cavalry, supported by artillery, resulting in a complete rout of the rebels, with considerable loss.--(Doc. 57.) Lieutenant Hoffman of the First New Jersey cavalry, and six of his men, were surprised while on picket-duty, at a point three miles from Dumfries, Va. In their unsuccessful resistance, private Thomas Buffin was seriously wounded.--General Averill sent a reconnoisance from Brooks's Station, up the Rappahannock River, which succeeded in capturing a number of rebel pickets, and obtaining valuable information.--At three o'clock this morning parts of two companies of the Eighth Pennsylvania cavalry, numbering sixty men, under the command of Captain Wilson, were attacked a
ville, Ky., between a detachment of the Second Michigan cavalry, under the command of Lieutenant Darrow, and the advance-guard of the rebel forces, under General J. H. Morgan, resulting in a retreat of the latter with some loss.--(Doc. 88.) The obsequies of Rev. A. B. Fuller, late Chaplain of the Sixteenth regiment of Massachusetts volunteers, killed at Fredericksburgh, Va., took place at Boston, Mass.--A portion of Colonel Spears's Eleventh Pennsylvania cavalry, had a spirited engagement at Joiner's Bridge, four miles above Franklin, on the Blackwater River, Va., with a squadron of rebel cavalry and a body of infantry, whom he dispersed, capturing one man and horse, and three infantry soldiers and their arms.--Philadelphia Inquirer. A detachment of General Sherman's expeditionary army, under the command of General M. L. Smith, destroyed a section of the Vicksburgh and Texas Railway, about ten miles west of Vicksburgh, and burned the stations at Delhi and Dallas.--(Doc. 91.)
ere adopted, and speeches were made by Governor Wright, Governor Andrew Johnson, of Tennessee, General S. F. Carey, of Ohio, T. Buchanan Read, of Pennsylvania, Charles W. Cathcart, Charles Case, and others. A freight train on the Louisville and Nashville Railroad, laden with merchandise belonging to private individuals, and a quantity of Government stores, and two hundred and forty mules, were this day captured near Woodburn, Tenn., by a party of rebel guerrillas. After driving off the mules and rifling the cars of their contents, they set fire to and totally destroyed them; they then raised steam upon the locomotive to its fullest height, and started it along the road at the top of its speed, hoping that it would encounter the passenger train coming from Nashville. The locomotive drove along the track through Franklin, and passed other stations at a fearful rate of speed, but the supply of steam was finally exhausted, and the machine came to a full stop, without doing any harm.
March 17. A detachment of National troops under the command of Colonel Spear, attacked the rebel breastworks on the Black Water, near Franklin, Va., but without being able to carry them. The fight lasted for more than an hour, in which Colonel Spear had one man killed, and sixteen men wounded.--Baltimore American. A spirited cavalry engagement occurred at Kelly's Ford, on the Rappahannock River, Va., between a strong reconnoitring force of Union troops under the command of Gen. Averill, and a body of rebel cavalry under Gen. Fitz-Hugh Lee, in which the latter, after a most desperate struggle, of four hours duration, were repulsed, and finally routed and pursued for a distance of six miles.--(Doc. 139.) By order of the War Department, Colonel James B. Fry was detailed as Provost-Marshal General of the United States, in pursuance of section five of the act approved March 3, 1863, for enrolling and calling out the National forces, and for other purposes.--The British st
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The Peninsular campaign. (search)
ve run the batteries at the earliest possible moment; but during the night of the 3d and 4th of May the enemy evacuated his positions, regarding them as untenable under the impending storm of heavy projectiles. Meanwhile, on the 22d of April, Franklin's division of McDowell's corps had joined me by water, in consequence of my urgent calls for reenforcements. The moment the evacuation of Yorktown was known, the order was given for the advance of all the disposable cavalry and horse batterie The heavy storms which had prevailed recommenced on the afternoon of the 4th, and not only impeded the advance of troops by land, but delayed the movement by water so much that it was not until the morning of the 7th that the leading division — Franklin's — disembarked near West Point and took up a suitable position to hold its own and cover the landing of reenforcements. This division was attacked not long after it landed, but easily repulsed the enemy. Meanwhile the enemy's rear-guard hel
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