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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Vermont Volunteers. (search)
tony Creek June 28-29. Ream's Station June 29. Siege of Petersburg till August. Sheridan's Shenandoah Valley Campaign August 7-November 28. Winchester August 17. Kearneysville August 25. Near Brucetown and Winchester September 7. Battle of Opequan September 20. Near Cedarville September 20. Front Royal September 21. Milford September 22. Fisher's Hill September 22. Waynesboro September 29. Columbia Furnace and Back Road, near Strasburg, October 7. Tom's Brook, Woodstock Races, October 8-9. Mount Olive October 9. Battle of Cedar Creek October 19. Near Kernstown November 10. Newtown and Cedar Creek November 12. Rude's Hill, near Mount Jackson, November 22. Expedition to Lacy Springs December 19-22. Lacy Springs December 21. Sheridan's Raid February 27-March 25, 1865. Waynesboro March 2. Occupation of Staunton March 2. Occupation of Charlottesville March 3. Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9. Dinwiddie Cou
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, West Virginia Volunteers. (search)
Corps, to May, 1864. 2nd Brigade, De Russy's Division, 22nd Army Corps, to July, 1864. 4th Brigade, De Russy's Division, 22nd Army Corps, to October, 1864. 3rd Brigade, De Russy's Division, 22nd Army Corps, to December, 1864. 1st Brigade, De Russy's Division, 22nd Army Corps, to June, 1865. Service. Duty at Franklin, Va., till May 25, 1862. Pursuit of Jackson up the Shenandoah Valley May 25-June 14. Mount Carmel Road, near Strasburg, June 1. Strasburg June 2. Tom's Brook June 3. Mount Jackson June 6. Battle of Cross Keys June 8. Port Republic June 9. At Sperryville till August. Pope's Campaign in Northern Virginia August 8-September 2. Battle of Cedar Mountain August 9 (Reserve). Rappahannock Station August 20-21. Freeman's Ford August 22. Sulphur Springs August 24. Waterloo Bridge August 24-25. Plains of Manassas August 27. Gainesville August 28. Groveton August 29. Bull Run August 30. Duty in the Defenses of
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, United States--Regular Army. (search)
7. Rockfish Gap September 28. Mount Crawford October 2. Tom's Brook, Woodstock Races, October 8-9. Expedition into Surrey County 7. Rockfish Gap September 28. Mount Crawford October 2. Tom's Brook, Woodstock Races, October 8-9. Battle of Cedar Creek October 7. Rockfish Gap September 28. Mount Crawford October 2. Tom's Brook, Woodstock Races, October 8-9. Expedition into Surrey County mber 21. Milford September 22. Waynesboro September 29. Tom's Brook October 8-9. Battle of Cedar Creek October 19. Expedition r 19. Fisher's Hill September 21. Milford September 22. Tom's Brook October 8-9. Duty at Winchester and in the Shenandoah Valley mber 21. Milford September 22. Waynesboro September 29. Tom's Brook October 8-9. Battle of Cedar Creek October 19. Expedition mber 21. Milford September 22. Waynesboro September 29. Tom's Brook October 8-9. Expedition to Lacey's Springs December 19-22.
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Chapter 3: through Harper's Ferry to Winchester—The Valley of the Shenandoah. (search)
burg, Ashby made a display of his artillery, fired a few shots, and retreated; and in this manner we had chased him about four miles beyond the town. When we halted, Jackson halted. Our pickets were about a mile beyond our camp: they were on Tom's Brook, as it was called. About a mile beyond the brook I could see the Rebel cavalry. Sometimes the enemy amused himself by throwing shells at our pickets, when they were a little too venturesome; but beyond a feeble show of strength and ugliness,, laws and religions, property and possessions, all give way before this mysterious power. In view of such scenes I have often felt the sternness of this reality. Here indeed is the inevitable. It is born of destiny. Hardly had we passed Tom's Brook, where our advance guard had been stationed, when we came in sight of the enemy's cavalry pickets. Saluting them with a shot or two from my battery (Cothran's Parrotts), I moved rapidly towards Woodstock. As we were descending the hill which
t had seemed madness to attack, while Sheridan and his admirable staff were on every part of the line, shouting Forward, forward everything! and to all inquiries for instruction the reply was still Go on; don't stop; go on! Formations were little heeded in the rush, but the whole Confederate line broke from its trenches. Pond's Shenandoah, p. 177. General Early justly sums it up, My whole force retired in considerable confusion. In this sudden attack and victory few men fell. At Tom's Brook (October 8, 9), a purely cavalry fight, where Sheridan directed Torbert to set off at daylight and whip the rebel cavalry or get whipped himself, Lowell's brigade, including his own regiment (the 2d Mass. Cavalry), were engaged; and Torbert wrote afterwards that the cavalry totally covered themselves with glory, and added to their list victories ... the most decisive the country has ever witnessed. They captured prisoners, guns, ambulances, headquarters, wagons, everything on wheels, it
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments., Second regiment Massachusetts Cavalry. (search)
Winchester, Va.; and at this time, though the regiment numbered 1,100 men, only 15 officers and 500 men were present, 200 were in Southern prisons, over 200 absent, wounded or sick, and over 100 absent on detached service; in January, 175 recruits were added. In February, 1865, as part of the 1st Division, Reserve Brigade, the regiment advanced to Petersburg; after the evacuation of Richmond it engaged in the pursuit of the Confederates until the surrender of General Lee at Appomattox. Having encamped for a time near Petersburg, it took part under General Sheridan against Johnston's army; participated afterward in the grand review at Washington, and, after remaining in camp in Fairfax County until July 20, 1865, was mustered out at Fair. fax Court House, being finally paid off and discharged Aug. 3, 1865, at Readville, Mass. Present also at Fort Reno, Poolesville, Summit Point, Luray, Tom's Brook, South Anna, White Oak Road, Dinwiddie Court House, Sailor's Creek and Appomattox.
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments., Thirty-fourth regiment Massachusetts Infantry. (search)
eral Hunter having succeeded General Sigel in command of the department. Returning from the campaign to Lynchburg, the regiment reached Martinsburg July 11, 1864, met the enemy at Snicker's Gap July 18 and at Winchester on the 24th. In August it moved into Maryland, and, the department being re-enforced by the 6th and 19th Army Corps, the regiment, in command of Major Pratt, shared in General Sheridan's campaign and took part in the battles of Opequon and Fisher's Hill, engaging also at Tom's Brook near Strasburg October 13, where Colonel Wells was mortally wounded, and at Cedar Creek October 19, engaging afterward in provost duty at Newtown, and moving in November to Opequon Crossing for outpost duty. After Colonel Wells' death Col. W. S. Lincoln was promoted to fill his place. As part of the 1st Division, Army of West Virginia, the regiment was ordered, December 17, to join the Army of the James before Petersburg, and, passing through Washington December 20, spent the autumn a
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died., Index of Battles, etc., Mentioned in Preliminary Narrative. (search)
Snicker's Ferry, Va. (July 18, 1864), 109. South Edisto River, S. C., 90. South Mountain, Md. (Sept. 14, 1862), 71. Southside Railroad, Va. (April 2, 1865), 129. Spotsylvania, Va. (May 8-18, 1864), 118. Strawberry Plains, Va. (Aug. 14-18, 1864), 126. Swift Creek, S. C. (April 19, 1865), 90. Swift Creek, Va., see Arrowfield Church. Summit Point, Va. (Aug. 21, 1864), 127. Three Creeks, Va. (see Weldon Railroad), 128. Todds' Tavern, Va. (May 4-7, 1864), 118. Tom's Brook, Va. (Oct. 8-9, 1864), 111. Totopotomoy, Va. (May 29-31, 1864), 122. Tranter's Creek, N. C. (June 5, 1862), 47. Trenton Bridge, N. C. (May 15, 1862), 47. Vicksburg, Miss. (June 26-29, 1862), 56. Washington, N. C. (Sept. 6, 1862), 47; (March 30-April 16, 1863), 49. Wassaw Sound, S. C. (June 17, 1863), 44. Wauhatchie, Tenn. (Oct. 27, 1863), 105. Waynesboroa, Va. (March 2, 1865), 112; (Sept. 28, 1864), 114. Weldon Railroad or Six Mile House, Va. (June 22, 1864), 124;
, Oct. 23, 1837. Captain, 20th Mass. Infantry, July 10, 1861. Transferred as Captain to 1st Mass. Cavalry, Nov. 28, 1861. Major, 2d Mass. Cavalry, Jan. 30, 1863. Lieut. Colonel, Mar. 1, 1864. Colonel, Oct. 21, 1864. In the actions of Ball's Bluff, Va., South Anna Bridge, Fort Stevens and Snicker's Gap; Rockville, Md., Poolesville, South Mountain, Antietam and Pocotaligo, S. C ; served under Sheridan, at Summit Point, Va., Berryville, Halltown, Opequon, Winchester, Luray, Waynesboroa, Tom's Brook, Cedar Creek, White Oak Road, Dinwiddie Court House, Five Forks, Sailors' Creek and Appomattox Court House. Brevet Brig. General, U. S. Volunteers, Mar. 13, 1865. Resigned, June 16, 1865. Cunningham, James Adams. Born at Boston, Mass., Nov. 27, 1830. First Lieutenant, 32d Mass. Infantry, Nov. 15, 1861. Stationed at Fort Warren until May, 1862. Captain, Mar. 6, 1862. Joined the Army of the Potomac, with his regiment, July 3, 1862. Major, June 29, 1864. Lieut. Colonel, June 30, 1
alaxy, vol. 4, p. 700. — – Sept. 26, 29. Gen. Sheridan's despatches. Army and Navy Journal, vol. 2, p. 109. — – Sept. 26–Oct. 9. Including engagement at Tom's Brook. Army and Navy Journal, vol. 2, pp. 99, 114. — – Oct. 9. Engagement at Tom's Brook. Army and Navy Journal, vol. 2, p. 130. — – – – Gen. Sheridan's despatTom's Brook. Army and Navy Journal, vol. 2, p. 130. — – – – Gen. Sheridan's despatches. Army and Navy Journal, vol. 2, p. 125. — – Oct. 19. Engagement at Cedar Creek. Gen. Sheridan's despatches. Army and Navy Journal, vol. 2, p. 157. — – – – Sheridan's ride. Army and Navy Journal, vol. 2, pp. 136, 145, 152, 217. — – – – Gen. Early's address to his army, accounting for defeat at Cedar Creek; from Ric U. S. N. Buried at Charlestown, Mass., Nov. 24, 1864. Army and Navy Journal, vol. 2, p. 237. Tobin, Richard F. Services of. Bivouac, vol. 2, p. 54. Tom's Brook, Va. Engagement Oct. 9, 1864. Army and Navy Journal, vol. 2, p. 130. — – – Gen. Sheridan's despatches. Arm
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