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r a short trip, lay to on the Kentucky shore, near the head of Island No.1, where we remained through the night in company with other transports from Cairo and Bird's Point, aboard of which were troops, comprising the Seventh Iowa, commanded by Col. Lauman, Twenty-seventh Illinois, Col. Buford, Thirtieth Illinois, Col. Fouke, Thirished by each day's report. The official report in regard to missing is no doubt incorrect, as General Grant informs me that squads are returning every day to Bird's Point. Yesterday twenty more returned, and they reported that eighteen others, who had taken a different road, would shortly arrive in camp. It has been assertedthe party burying the dead and a company of cavalry, searching the woods for the dead and wounded. Private letter from a member of Taylor's battery. Bird's Point, Mo., Nov. 8. We returned last night from the hardest fought battle our troops have had since Wilson's Creek. It is the old story. We were over-powered by su
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, Chapter 8: from the battle of Bull Run to Paducah--Kentucky and Missouri. 1861-1862. (search)
f, talking of things generally, and the subject then was of the much-talked — of advance, as soon as the season would permit. Most people urged the movement down the Mississippi River; but Generals Polk and Pillow had a large rebel force, with heavy guns in a very strong position, at Columbus, Kentucky, about eighteen miles below Cairo. Commodore Foote had his gunboat fleet at Cairo; and General U. S. Grant, who commanded the district, was collecting a large force at Paducah, Cairo, and Bird's Point. General Halleck had a map on his table, with a large pencil in his hand, and asked, Where is the rebel line? Cullum drew the pencil through Bowling Green, Forts Donelson and Henry, and Columbus, Kentucky. That is their line, said Halleck. Now, where is the proper place to break it? And either Cullum or I said, Naturally the centre. Halleck drew a line perpendicular to the other, near its middle, and it coincided nearly with the general course of the Tennessee River; and he said, That
ety: old flint-lock muskets, rifles and shot-guns of almost every known style. Great quantities of cartridges were found made up; for use in their smooth-bore guns, containing three buck-shot and a bullet each. In the magazine of the Fort were stored a large quantity of powder and ammunition of all kinds. Everything was prepared for a vigorous resistance, and had it been attempted, I have no doubt that it would have proved more difficult of capture than all the fortifications of Cairo, Bird's Point, and Fort Holt combined. Perhaps the point which struck us most forcibly with surprise, after entering the works, was the enormous extent of the plan which had been proposed and partially carried out in the fortifications. As I before stated, the exterior line of breastworks, with their ditches and abattis, enclose at least a square mile. One single line of rifle-pits extends nearly a mile and a half. And this is only one of three lines of defence which were to be overcome before th
Doc. 75.-engagement near New-Madrid, Mo. General Halleck's despatch. St. Louis, March 3. it is officially reported that Jeff. Thompson, with a large force of cavalry and artillery, came North from New-Madrid. Our forces advanced from Bird's Point, and met his force at Sykestown. He was pursued into the swamps by the cavalry of Gen. Hamilton and Col. Morgan's brigade, and three pieces of artillery captured. Gen. Pope pursued another detachment south, capturing three more pieces of artillery, one captain, one lieutenant, and a number of privates. H. W. Halleck, Major-General Commanding. Cincinnati Commercial account. army of the Mississippi in the field, near New-Madrid, Mo., Tuesday, March 4, 1862. Marching orders were issued on Thursday night, and on Friday morning, February twenty-eighth, the division was on its way for New-Madrid. The roads were in fine order for the infantry, and there was no great difficulty in moving the baggage-train. We encamped t
educing the place by siege than to sacrifice the lives of the men under his command, in an attempt to carry it by assault. Col. Bissell procured three thirty-two pound siege-guns and an eight-inch mortar. These were taken across the river to Bird's Point, thence by railroad to Sykestown, and then overland to their place of destination. Immediately on their arrival there, a force was sent out to drive in the enemy's pickets, and under cover of the darkness two parapets, eighteen feet in thicknion, and ere daylight they were in readiness to commence their work. It is an instructive illustration of what the efforts of one energetic man can accomplish, that in thirty-five hours from the time when the guns were loaded upon the cars at Bird's Point, they opened upon the enemy. During this time they had been carried twenty miles by railroad, unloaded from the cars and placed upon carriages, drawn twenty miles more over a rough road, through mud in some places almost impassable for team
began the building of barracks, cleared parade grounds, mounted guns, and threw up fortifications against the attack which never came. In the upper pictures the men are at work rushing to completion the unfinished Fort Darling, which was situated to the left of the drill grounds seen in the lower panorama. In the latter we see one of the innumerable drills with which the troops were kept occupied and tuned up for the active service before them. Across the Mississippi was the battery at Bird's Point, on the Missouri shore. This and Fort Darling were occupied by the First and Second Illinois Light Artillery, but their labors were chiefly confined to the prevention of contraband traffic on the river. The troops at Cairo did not see any campaigning till Grant led them to Paducah, Ky., September 5-6, 1861. Uncompleted earthworks, Camp defiance Drill grounds of the defenders of Cairo, Ill. By this brilliant and important victory Grant's fame sprang suddenly into full
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Engagements of the Civil War with losses on both sides December, 1860-August, 1862 (search)
Potosi, Mo. Union, Mo. Home Guards. Losses: Union 1 killed. Confed. 2 killed, 3 wounded. August 17, 1861: Brunswick, Mo. Union, 5th Mo. Reserves. Losses: Union 1 killed, 7 wounded. August 19, 1861: Charleston or Bird's Point, Mo. Losses: Union 1 killed, 6 wounded. Confed. 40 killed. August 20, 1861: Hawk's Nest, W. Va. Losses: Union 3 wounded. Confed. 1 killed, 3 wounded. August 26, 1861: Cross Lanes or Summerville, W. Va. Losses: Uniotober 13, 1861: wet Glaze, or Monday's Hollow, Mo. Union, 13th Ill., 1st Mo. Battalion, Fremont Battalion, Mo. Cav. Confed. No record found. Losses: Confed. 67 killed (estimate). October 14, 1861: Underwood's Farm (12 miles from Bird's Point), Mo. Union, 1st Ill. Cav. Confed., 1st Miss. Cav. Losses: Union 2 killed, 5 wounded. Confed. 1 killed, 2 wounded. October 15, 1861: Big River Bridge, near Potosi, Mo. Union, 40 men of the 38th Ill. Confed., 2d, 3d Mis
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Diary of Rev. J. G. Law. (search)
he word of God on the Sabbath, our brave boys in Virginia were facing death on the field of battle. General Beauregard, it is said, defeated McDowell at Manassas Gap on the 21st of the month. The loss is said to be heavy on both sides. Received marching orders to day. A dispatch from General Pillow, orders us to be ready to march to-morrow with two days rations. Our destination is not known, but we will probably go either to Virginia or Missouri. Some think that we are to attack Bird's Point, Missouri. If so, we will have some very hard fighting, and many of the brave and gallant Tennessee volunteers will bite the dust. July 26th.--In pursuance with the orders of General Pillow we have been busy to day making preparations for our march. It is now reduced to almost a certainty that we are going to Missouri. The last scene at Randolph is a sublime one. I am writing by the brilliant light of a bonfire made from dry boxes and barrels, the remnants of the camp of the Hickory Rif
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid, Chapter 2: (search)
of staff, talking of things generally, and the subject then was of the much-talked — of advance, as soon as the season would permit. Most people urged the movement down the Mississippi River; but Generals Polk and Pillow had a large rebel force with heavy guns in a very strong position at Columbus, Ky., about eighteen miles below Cairo; Commodore Foote had his gun-boat fleet at Cairo; and General U. S. Grant, who commanded the district, was collecting a large force at Paducah, Cairo, and Bird's Point. General Halleck had a map on his table, with a large pencil in his hand, and asked, Where is the rebel line? Cullum drew the pencil through Bowling Green, Forts Donelson and Henry, and Columbus, Ky. That is their line, said Halleck; now where is the proper place to break it? And either Cullum or I said, Naturally the center. Halleck drew a line perpendicular to the other, near its middle, and it coincided nearly with the general course of the Tennessee River, and he said, That's the t
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bird's Point, (search)
Bird's Point, Opposite Cairo, was fortified early in 1861 by the National troops. It was on the west. side of the Mississippi River, a few feet higher than Cairo, so that a battery upon it would completely command that place. The Confederates were anxious to secure this point, and to that end General Pillow, who was collecting Confederate troops in western Tennessee. worked with great energy. When Governor Jackson, of Missouri. raised the standard of revolt at Jefferson City, with Sterling Price as military commander, General Lyon, in command of the department, moved more vigorously in the work already begun in the fortification of Bird's Point. His attention had been called to the importance of the spot by Captain Benham, of the engineers, who constructed the works. They were made so strong that they could defy any force the Confederates might bring against them. With these opposite points so fortified, the Nationals controlled a great portion of the navigation of the Mi
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