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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Eleventh North Carolina Regiment. (search)
n Lieutenant-Colonel Owens was elected Colonel of the Fifty-third. At the same time, May 6th, Captain E. A. Ross, of Company A, was promoted to the majority. The regiment, therefore, went into service early in May among the troops for the defence of Wilmington with the following organization: Colonel Collett Leventhorpe, Lieutenant-Colonel W. J. Martin, Major Egbert A. Ross, Surgeon John Wilson, Assistant-Surgeon J. Parks McCombs, Assistant-Quartermaster John N. Tate, Assistant-Commissary of Subsistence Pat J. Lowrie, Adjutant H. C. Lucas, Chaplain A. S. Smith, Captain W. L. Hand, Company A, Mecklenburg; Captain M. D. Armfield, Company B, Burke; Captain F. W. Bird, Company C, Bertie; Captain C. S. Brown, Company D, Burke; Captain J. S. A. Nichols, Company E, Mecklenburg; Captain E. A. Small, Company F, Chowan; Captain J. A. Jennings, Company G, Orange; Captain W. L. Grier, Company H, Mecklenburg; Captain A. S. Haynes, Company I, Lincoln; Captain J. M. Young, Company K, Buncombe.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of New Market, Va., again, (search)
so feasible that a picked body of men was formed, the volunteers being ignorant of their destination and being only forwarned that they were composing a forlorn hope. As my memory serves me, these volunteers were taken from the following commands, at the rate of six or eight from each: Edgecombe Guards, Charlotte Grays, Hornet's Nest Riflemen, Orange Light Infantry, Lafayette Light Infantry, Burke Rifles, Independent Light Infantry,. Enfield Rifles, Southern Stars, Bertie Light Infantry, Chowan Light Infantry, Stuart's and Montague's Virginia Light Infantry, twelve dismounted men of Douthat's Virginia Cavalry. After this lapse of time my recollection is indistinct, and I can recall by name of these volunteers only J. B. Smith, R. M. Orrell, James T. Rose, Theodore Wardell and J. W. Hurlst, of my own company, the Lafayette; Charles Haigh, W. E. Kyle, Jarvis Lutterloh and John B. McKellar, of the Independent Company. All were killed during the war or have died since except Haigh,
gland, the plantations of Virginia extended along the sea. The country on Nansemund River had been settled as early as 1609; in 1622, the adventurous Porey, then secre- 1622. Feb. tary of the Old Dominion, travelled over land to the South River, Chowan, and, on his return, celebrated the kindness of the native people, the fertility of the country, and the happy climate, that yielded two harvests in each year. Smith's Virginia, II. 64. If no immediate colonization ensued, if the plans formed he attention of the proprietaries, and Berkeley was commissioned to institute a government over the region, which, in honor of Monk, received the name that time has transferred to the bay. The plantations were chiefly on the northeast bank of the Chowan; and, as the mouth of that river is north of the thirty-sixth parallel of latitude, they were not included in the first patent of Carolina. Yet Berkeley, who was but governor of Virginia, and was a joint proprietary of Carolina, obeyed his inter
vessel can can reach it, the water not being sufficiently deep. On the north Pamlico connects with Albemarle Sound, which is sixty miles long from east to west, and from four to fifteen miles wide. It receives the waters of Roanoke and Chowan rivers, and communicates with the Chesapeake bay by the Dismal Swamp canal. Edenton is situated near the mouth of Chowan river, on Edenton bay, which sets up from the Albemarle Sound. It is sixty-six mile from Norfolk. The Orleans river iChowan river, on Edenton bay, which sets up from the Albemarle Sound. It is sixty-six mile from Norfolk. The Orleans river is formed by the union of the Northway and Meherrin rivers, which rise in Virginia and unite above Winton, N. C. and flowing S. S. E., it enters Albemarle Sound by a wide estuary a little south of the mouth of the Roanoke. It is navigable for small sail vessels to Murfreesborough, on the Meherrin branch, about 75 miles from the ocean. Elizabeth City, North Carolina, is on the Pasquotank river, twenty miles from its entrance into Albemarle Sound, forty miles S. S. W. of Norfolk. Vessels dra
The Daily Dispatch: February 10, 1862., [Electronic resource], The North Carolina coast and its points of interest and defence. (search)
ssibility of the main land bordering it, is of little consequence to the enemy, except in a rear attack upon Beaufort with light steamers. Batteries are erected, we understand, to cut off such an attempt.--But the possession of Hatteras by the enemy, in the absence of the most complete defence upon Neuse and Pamlico rivers and at Roanoke Island, might give him entire control of the granary of the South. Craven, Beaufort, Hyde, Tyrrell, Washington, Currituck; Camden, Pasquotank, Perquimans, Chowan, Gates, Hertford, Bertie, Martin, and even Northampton and Halifax counties, without these defences, are all laid open to his ravages. These counties have heretofore furnished Norfolk, Wilmington, Charleston, and Savannah a larger amount of corn than they obtained from all other sources, besides the large shipments they made to Baltimore, New York, and Providence. The product of surplus corn from these counties is immense. Add to this the entire loss of the whole fishing interest of these
ceunts. The city was full of rumors yesterday, and the excited imaginations of the people were kept in constant activity. It was currently reported, and extensively believed, that the enemy had penetrated the State of North Carolian as far as Murfreesboro', a little town in Hertford county, bordering on Southampton, Va. and not far from the line of the Seaboard and Roancke Railroad.--Another report had it that the Federals were within thirty miles of Murfreesboro', having gone up the Chowan river in small boats to do which it would be necessary to pass the town of Edenton. There is, however, no confirmation of these statements, official or otherwise, and we have every reason to believe that the enemy has not penetrated to any point beyond Elizabeth City. Mr. F. W. Tichenor, Sergeant Major of Cavalry in the Wise Legion, arrived in the city last evening, from Currituck Bridge, on the Albamarle and Chesapeake Canal, which place he left on Monday night. We learn from him that Ge
letter from Suffolk, dated to-day, which says that Edenton and Heriford have both been captured. Five gunboats moved slowly to the wharf at Edenton on yesterday, at nine o'clock, and landed their troops. Very soon afterwards fifteen more gunboats arrived. The citizens raised a white flag. Between three and four thousand Federal troops have landed at Edenton. The population of Edenton is about 2,000, and distant from Suffolk about fifty miles. In the afternoon two gunboats went up the Chowan river towards Winton, and several others towards the mouth of the Roanoke. A gentleman who has just arrived from Gatesville, says that 700 horses were landed at Edenton last night, and also that a large number had been landed at Elizabeth City. Hertford, the capital of Perquimans county, was taken by the Federals on yesterday. It has a population of about 1,500. Capt. Goodwin, of the Robson (N. C.) Rip Van Winkles, with fifty-two of his men and seven of the Wise Legion, have rea
The Daily Dispatch: February 15, 1862., [Electronic resource], The enemy in North Carolina--his movements and Designs. (search)
The enemy in North Carolina--his movements and Designs. The Wilmington Journal, of Wednesday, contains the following interesting facts in relation to the enemy in North Carolina, and of the Roanoke fight: The Federal gunboats have passed up to Winton, the county seat of Hertford county, on the Chowan river. The Chowan is formed by the confluence of the Meherrin and Nottaway rivers. The main branch of Nottaway is the Black Water, which is crossed by the Seaboard and Roanoke Railroad about half way between. Weldon and Portsmouth, though rather nearer to the latter place. The Black Water is navigable up to the railroad, as a steamer has been running regularly in connection with the railroad trains, although necessarily a small one, owing to the narrowness and crookedness of the stream. The movements of the Lincolnite gunboats would seem to indicate a desire to force their way up as far as the Portsmouth road, so as either to obtain possession of it, or at least cut off co
one to some other point. The number of horses landed was over-estimated. The Federals assured the citizens of Edenton that they had not come to rob or harass them; but while the officers were giving those assurances to the people, the soldiers were filling their gunboats with cotton found on the wharf. Elizabeth City is partially deserted by the Federals. The latest information from Winton reports that nothing had been seen there of the Federal gunboats which started up the Chowan river from Edenton. They were, perhaps, only reconnoitering. Dr. Cohoon, a wealthy citizen of Elizabeth City, is now at Suffolk, a refuges. He remained there until the enemy had possession of Elizabeth City, and, although invited back and assured that he would not be harmed, he was not disposed to trust them. The Rev Shadrach Warrell, of Gatesville, had a cargo of corn captured in Albemarle Sound. Mr. Elliott saved 79,000 pounds of Government pork, which was at Hertford. A
Latest from Edenton, N. C. the Yankees up the Chowan river — the militia of Chowan — refugees, &c., &c. Patersburg, Feb. 16. --The latest information from Edenton, via Suffolk, is to Thursday, at which time the Yankees were in quiet possession, and their pickets extended six miles in this direction. On WedChowan — refugees, &c., &c. Patersburg, Feb. 16. --The latest information from Edenton, via Suffolk, is to Thursday, at which time the Yankees were in quiet possession, and their pickets extended six miles in this direction. On Wednesday afternoon the Yankees ascended the Chowan river to Hally's Whart, eight miles from the month of the river. Finding nobody but a few negroes, they raised white flag and passed over to Coleraine, on the opposite side of the river. What they did at Coleraine is unknown. Col. Mitchell, militia commander of Chowan county,Chowan river to Hally's Whart, eight miles from the month of the river. Finding nobody but a few negroes, they raised white flag and passed over to Coleraine, on the opposite side of the river. What they did at Coleraine is unknown. Col. Mitchell, militia commander of Chowan county, was at Edenton when the Yankees arrived, and conversed with a Yankee captain, and was assured that they did not intend to interfere with private property or disturb citizens not in arms. When Colonel Mitchell left Edenton, a few old cannon had been destroyed and some cotton removed to gunboats, but no other depredations had been<
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