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General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 2: from New Mexico to Manassas. (search)
of incandescent charm until the sound of the first notes of The Bonny Blue flag reached her ear. Then her feet rose in gleeful springs, her limbs danced, her hands patted, her eyes glowed, her lips moved, though she did not care to speak, or listen to any one. She seemed lifted in the air, thrilled and afloat, holding to the Single Star in joyful hope of Southern rights. Friends at El Paso persuaded me to leave my family with them to go by a train that was to start in a few days for San Antonio, and to take the faster route by stage for myself. Our travelling companions were two young men, returning to their Northern homes. The ride of our party of four (including the driver) through the Indian country was attended with some risk, and required vigilance, to be assured against surprise. The constant watchfulness and possible danger over a five-hundred-miles travel drew us near together, and in closer communion as to our identity and future movements, and suggested to the yo
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant, Chapter 11 (search)
een convinced that they could not have captured the city by making a dash upon it which might have saved them many months of arduous labor, sickness, and fatigue. The matter was seldom referred to again in conversation, for General Grant, with his usual habit of mind, bent all his energies toward consummating his plans for the future. There has been brought out recently a remarkable vindication of Grant's judgment in ordering the assault at Cold Harbor. In a lecture delivered at San Antonio, Texas, April 20, 1896, by ex-United States Senator John H. Reagan, who was postmaster-general in Jefferson Davis's cabinet, he states that he and several of the judges of the courts in Richmond rode out to General Lee's headquarters, and were with him during this attack. In describing the interview he says: He [Lee] then said to me that General Grant was at that time assaulting his lines at three different places, with columns of from six to eight deep. Upon this, I asked him if his
in a short time it was established. Up to this time I had been on detached duty, but soon my own company was ordered into the field to occupy a position on Turkey Creek, about ten or twelve miles west of the Nueces River, on the road from San Antonio to Fort Duncan, and I was required to join the company. Here constant work and scouting were necessary, as our camp was specially located with reference to protecting from Indian raids the road running from San Antonio to Fort Duncan, and on San Antonio to Fort Duncan, and on to the interior of Mexico. In those days this road was the great line of travel, and Mexican caravans were frequently passing over it, to and from, in such a disorganized condition as often to invite attack from marauding Comanches and Lipans. Our time, therefore, was incessantly occupied in scouting, but our labors were much lightened because they were directed with intelligence and justice by Captain McLean, whose agreeable manners and upright methods are still so impressed on my memory th
decided to traverse the State with two columns of cavalry, directing one to San Antonio under Merritt, the other to Houston under Custer. Both commands were to d with rheumatism. By the time the two columns were ready to set out for San Antonio and Houston, General Frank Herron, with and division of the Thirteenth Corpsordered to report to me accordingly, I sent the Fourth Corps to Victoria and San Antonio, and the bulk of the Twenty-fifth to Brownsville. Then came the feeding and caring for all these troops — a difficult matter-for those at Victoria and San Antonio had to be provisioned overland from Indianola across the hog-wallow prairie, scene of my attempt. Merritt's cavalry and the Fourth Corps still being at San Antonio, I went to that place and reviewed these troops, and having prepared them wI was only awaiting the arrival of the troops, then under marching orders at San Antonio, to cross the Rio Grande in behalf of the Liberal cause. Ample corrobora
outhern child be educated outside the limits of the Confederate States. We have excellent schools and colleges at Richmond and Norfolk in Virginia; at Charleston and Columbia in South Carolina; at Savannah and Augusta in Georgia; at St. Augustine in Florida; at Mobile in Alabama; at Bay St. Louis, Pass Christian, Sulphur Springs, Vicksburg, and Natchez in Mississippi; at Fort Smith, Helena, and Little Rock in Arkansas; at Marksville, and Memphis in Tennessee; at Galveston, New Braunfels, San Antonio, Brownsville, and Liberty in Texas; and at St. Michael's Grand Coteau, Vermillionville, Thibodeaux, Donaldsonville, Natchitoches, Avoyelles, Alexandria, Shreveport, Iberville, Algiers, and New Orleans in Louisiana. The social bonds between us and the Catholics at the North have been severed by them. We acknowledge them no longer as our countrymen. They and their institutions have no claims upon us. The Burlington (Vt.) Times, of this date, contains an extended narrative of the mov
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The Confederate invasion of New Mexico and Arizona. (search)
ops for the conquest of New Mexico. On the 18th of November Sibley was ready to move from San Antonio, Texas. His brigade consisted of Colonel John R. Baylor's regiment of Texas Mounted Rifles (thenort Craig on that day the Confederates would have commenced their retreat at that time for San Antonio, Texas. After remaining two days at Valverde, to bury the dead and give needed rest to his menew rounds, when Canby retired and passed through Carnuel Cañon to the little adobe village of San Antonio on the east side of the Sandia Mountain, where he soon was joined by Colonel G. R. Paul and hmore expedient to allow them to retreat out of the territory and through the wilderness to San Antonio, Texas, than to capture the entire party and be forced to subsist them. This action of Canby cauon, was rapidly approaching from Southern California, he commenced his farther retreat for San Antonio, Texas. His force was entirely demoralized, and moved on its way without discipline or command,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Canby's services in the New Mexican campaign. (search)
oped that this discussion may elicit from some of the survivors of Sibley's column a detailed account of that retreat. Soon after Canby assumed command of the department, and before he had time to get it fairly in hand, he was confronted with the appalling disaster of San Augustine Springs. This was quickly followed by the intelligence that two expeditions were forming to attack him,--one in Northern Texas under Van Dorn, to enter by the Canadian route against Fort Union; the other at San Antonio, under Sibley, intended to reinforce Baylor at El Paso. He was therefore compelled to keep a strong force at Fort Union, another at Fort Craig, and to hold a third at an intermediate point whence he could succor the division first attacked. This prevented him from acting aggressively against Baylor early in the campaign. After Sibley had passed Fort Craig, Canby called a meeting of his senior officers and outlined to them his plan of campaign, which was to follow the enemy closely in h
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Iuka and Corinth. (search)
to have heard any order from him above the rifle's rattle and the cannon's roar at such a distance. I cannot say what General Rosecrans may have said to these regiments about using the bayonet when visiting my lines that morning before the occurrence mentioned, but I do know that I posted them myself, and that Colonel J. W. Fuller, 27th Ohio, commander of the brigade during the heat of the battle, gave the order for his own and the 1th Missouri regiments to charge with the bayonet. San Antonio, Texas, January 19th, 1888. The opposing forces at Corinth, Miss., October 3d and 4th, 1862. The composition, losses, and strength of each army as here stated give the gist of all the data obtainable in the Official Records. K stands for killed; w for wounded; m w for mortally wounded; m for captured or missing; c for captured. The Union forces. Army of the Mississippi.--Major-General William S. Rosecrans. Second division, Brig.-Gen. David S. Stanley. Staff loss: v, 1. Firs
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., An order to charge at Corinth. (search)
so as to get out of the range of the enemy's lire, and the moment he had exhausted himself to charge with the bayonet. The lapse of a quarter of a century has certainly made the memory of the worthy general treacherous, for at the time that his memory causes him to say that he gave this order, I saw him a quarter of a mile away trying to rally Davies's troops to resist the advancing forces of the Confederates, and I consider it impossible for the two regiments to have heard any order from him above the rifle's rattle and the cannon's roar at such a distance. I cannot say what General Rosecrans may have said to these regiments about using the bayonet when visiting my lines that morning before the occurrence mentioned, but I do know that I posted them myself, and that Colonel J. W. Fuller, 27th Ohio, commander of the brigade during the heat of the battle, gave the order for his own and the 1th Missouri regiments to charge with the bayonet. San Antonio, Texas, January 19th, 1888.
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 11: the Montgomery Convention.--treason of General Twiggs.--Lincoln and Buchanan at the Capital. (search)
Headquarters, at the Alamo, in the city of San Antonio, they took measures to prevent its reaching One of them was captured and taken back to San Antonio, and the other reached Waite, with the ordeh. Other troops had been ordered away from San Antonio by Twiggs when the danger of revolution becary force to capture the National troops in San Antonio. He received directions to that effect on 1861. the little band of National troops in San Antonio marched sullenly out of the city, to the tu days. Secession Times in Texas, page 11 San Antonio was full of loyal men, and so was the Statenfidence. Colonel Waite, who started for San Antonio, with an escort of fifteen cavalry, immedias Fort Lancaster, on the mail-route between San Antonio to San Diego, in the midst of the remarkabl San Lucas Springs, twenty miles west from San Antonio, on the Castroville Road, he was confrontedxas, and these were held close prisoners at San Antonio, whilst Colonel Waite and his fellow-captiv[2 more...]
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