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The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Engagements of the Civil War with losses on both sides December, 1860-August, 1862 (search)
. Floyd. Losses: Union 2 killed, 15 wounded. Confed. 20 killed, 15 wounded, 50 captured. October 26, 1861: Saratoga, Ky. Union, 9th Ill. Confed., Capt. Wilcox's Cavalry. Losses: Union 4 wounded. Confed. 8 killed, 17 wounded. November, 1861. November 7, 1861: Belmont, Mo. Union, 22d, 27th, 30th, and 31st Ill., 7th Ia., Battery B 1st Ill. Artil., 2 companies 15th Ill. Cav. Confed., 13th Ark., 11th La., 2d, 12th, 13th, 15th, 21st, 22d, 154th (Senior) Tenn. Watson's, Stewart's La. Art., Smith's Miss. Battery, Hamilton's siege Battery. Losses: Union 90 killed, 173 wounded, 235 missing. Confed. 261 killed, 427 wounded, 278 missing. November 7, 1861: Galveston Harbor, Tex. U. S. Frigate Santee burned the Royal Yacht. Losses: Union I killed, 8 wounded. Confed. 3 wounded. November 7, 1861: Port Royal, S. C. Capture of Fort Beauregard and Fort Walker (Confederate). Union, Du Pont's fleet, 17 vessels, and 3 brigades of land forc
a field surgeon with the 21st Louisiana and 10th South Carolina regiments, and afterwards as a hospital surgeon. Dr. Foard was medical director of the Army of Tennessee. Dr. Graham was surgeon of the Sixty-seventh North Carolina Infantry. Dr. Kellar was medical director of the Trans-Mississippi Department. Christopher Hamilton Tebault, M. D. Medical director A. J. Foard Surgeon Joseph Graham Medical director J. M. Kellar Druitt's Surgery, Bartlett On Fevers, Wood's Practice, Watson's Practice, Tanner's Practice, and a copy of the United States Dispensatory, by Wood & Bache. Occasional copies of The Confederate States medical and surgical Journal, reached field and hospital surgeons. It was published in Richmond by Ayres & Wade, with the approval and under the supervision of the Surgeon-General, monthly from January, 1864, until February, 1865. A complete file from which much important historical data can possibly be obtained, is now in the Library of the Surgeon-G
a field surgeon with the 21st Louisiana and 10th South Carolina regiments, and afterwards as a hospital surgeon. Dr. Foard was medical director of the Army of Tennessee. Dr. Graham was surgeon of the Sixty-seventh North Carolina Infantry. Dr. Kellar was medical director of the Trans-Mississippi Department. Christopher Hamilton Tebault, M. D. Medical director A. J. Foard Surgeon Joseph Graham Medical director J. M. Kellar Druitt's Surgery, Bartlett On Fevers, Wood's Practice, Watson's Practice, Tanner's Practice, and a copy of the United States Dispensatory, by Wood & Bache. Occasional copies of The Confederate States medical and surgical Journal, reached field and hospital surgeons. It was published in Richmond by Ayres & Wade, with the approval and under the supervision of the Surgeon-General, monthly from January, 1864, until February, 1865. A complete file from which much important historical data can possibly be obtained, is now in the Library of the Surgeon-G
kneel, Maryland! For life and death, for woe and weal, Thy peerless chivalry reveal, And gird thy beauteous limbs with steel, Maryland, my Maryland! Thou wilt not cower in the dust, Maryland! Thy beaming sword shall never rust, Maryland! Remember Carroll's sacred trust, Remember Howard's warlike thrust, And all thy slumberers with the just, Maryland, my Maryland! Come! 'tis the red dawn of the day, Maryland! Come with thy panoplied array, Maryland! With Ringgold's spirit for the fray, With Watson's blood at Monterey, With fearless Lowe and dashing May, Maryland, my Maryland! ‘Burst the tyrant's chain’: Northern officers at a Maryland home in pleasant valley, after the battle of Antietam The young Maryland girl with the charming ruffles has evidently discovered at least one Northerner not a ‘tyrant’ or otherwise disagreeable. The scene is at the Lee homestead near the battlefield of Antietam; the time, October, 1862. Two members of General Burnside's staff and one of General
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General R. E. Bodes' report of the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
extreme left of the line of battle. Nothing of importance occurred here except a brisk attack of the enemy's skirmishers (after being reinforced), and his cavalry, upon Ramseur's sharpshooters. This attack was made late on the afternoon of the 14th of July, after the withdrawal of nearly all the artillery, and of all the main line of infantry. The enemy had unquestionably discovered this movement. His advance was so firmly and gallantly met by Ramseur's men, and the Second Howitzers, Captain Watson, that he fell back with the loss of many killed and wounded, and about twenty of the cavalry captured. On the memorable night of the 14th of July, the Second corps fell back to Williamsport, and forded the river. The artillery, under Lieutenant-Colonel Carter, I had sent off early in the afternoon, with orders to cross at Falling Waters, four miles below Williamsport, on the pontoon bridge which had been placed there. My division waded the river just above the aqueduct over the mout
strive to grow in grace ourselves, to use all means in our power to promote the growth of grace in each other, and to be instrumental in bringing others to a saving knowledge of the truth as it is in Jesus; in short, to realize and act out in our lives the truth that we are not our own, but are bought with a price, and are therefore bound to glorify God in our bodies and in our spirits, which are God's. Of this Association Lieutenant-Colonel Joseph N. Brown was President; Lieutenant R. 13. Watson and Adjutant W. P. Ready, Vice-Presidents; and Captain H. P. Griffith, Secretary and Treasurer. The soldiers in the West were as fully blessed with the spirit of revival as their comrades in the East. Vicksburg and other points on the Mississippi were sorely pressed by the Federals, and there was much marching, counter-marching, and fighting on the field and in trenches, but still the work of God went on with unusual power. In response to the urgent demand for more laborers in this gr
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Chapter 9: battle of Cedar Mountain (continued). (search)
, Hazelton, Livingston, and Sergeant Whitten, of Company A; Gilson and Corporal Oakes, of Company B; Brown, F. H. Cochrane, Francis, Corporal Gray, Hines, Jewell, Stonehall, and Williston, of Company C; Bickford, Corporal Fay, and Corporal Wilcox, of Company D; Ide and Sparrow, of Company E; Sergeant Andrews, Hatch, Howard, and Hoxsey, of Company G; Corporal Cahill, Corporal DeWeale, and Duffy, of Company H; Sergeant Willis, of Company I; and Conlan, Daly, Livingstone, Montague, Roberts, and Watson, of Company K,--were killed. Corporal Buxton, Gilman, and Spalding, of Company A; Stephens (J.), of Company B; Donovan, of Company C; Daniels, of Company E; Moore, of Company F; Dillingham, Greene (M.), Smith, and First Sergeant Williston, of Company G; Sylvester, of Company I; and Hauboldt, of Company K,were mortally wounded. Ninety-nine others were wounded ; and fourteen men, besides four of the wounded, were prisoners. Of the twenty-three officers who went on the field, seven only cam
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Chapter 17: campaign of Chattanooga (search)
and the next day received a gratifying reply in which Stanton rejoiced at his safety, assured him of the great anxiety he had felt about him for several days, directed him not only to make his arrangements to remain in the field during the winter, but to continue his reports as frequently as possible, always noting the hour. Nothing could show better than these words the value attached by the President and the Secretary of War to Dana's despatches, unless it be one a few days later from Watson, who in the absence of Stanton was acting Secretary of War. After notifying him that the President was sick and the secretary absent, he added: But both receive your despatches regularly, and esteem them highly, not merely because they are reliable, but for their clearness of narrative and their graphic pictures of the stirring events they describe. The patient endurance and spirited valor exhibited by commanders and men in the last great feat of arms, which has crowned our cause with such
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Chapter 18: Dana in the War Department (search)
d have been most useful in the higher position. Stanton was undoubtedly a true patriot and a great worker as well as a man of imperious will. The burden of administering the affairs of the army fell mainly upon his shoulders, and necessarily tried his temper as well as his strength. At times he was on the verge of collapse, and when it is considered that he had only two civil assistants, it can be well understood that he must have been frequently almost distracted. It was the duty of Watson and Dana to supervise the contracts for horses, mules, wagons, harness, tents, clothing, camp equipage, arms, ammunition, drums, fifes, flags, and every other article used by the army. Fraud was everywhere rampant, and everywhere those engaged in it had their friends among the governors of the States, the members of the Senate and of the House of Representatives. Many of these gentlemen were almost as impatient and overbearing as the secretary himself, but fortunately most of them stood in
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Chapter 21: administration of War Department (search)
he front assassination of Lincoln arrest and trial of conspirators capture and confinement of Jefferson Davis visits Fort Monroe events and great review at Washington returns to civil life Immediately after Early had withdrawn to the south side of the Potomac, and left Washington to comparative quiet and safety, Dana resumed his routine duties as Assistant Secretary of War, and soon became as completely absorbed in them as he had been in those of the army in the field. While he and Watson divided the work between them according to their own convenience, Dana gave special attention and much of his time to the investigation of frauds against the government on the part of contractors, and in the supervision of the operations of the Secret Service agents, who were employed in learning what was going on within the enemy's lines. But with all his cares he still found time for correspondence with his friends. On August 4, 1864, he wrote me from the War Department as follows:
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